August 14th, 2006
09:53 AM ET
3 years ago

Trivia: Think Some More!

WASHINGTON (CNN) – Last week, we told you the tale of one Kenneth McKellar, the 35-year U.S. Senate veteran from Tennessee who, despite his clever "Thinking Feller? Vote McKellar" campaign slogan, lost his state's 1952 Democratic primary to a candidate with an even more clever slogan. We asked Grind readers the world over to name that winning slogan in exchange for a fabulous, that is to say, "available," prize.

As many of you pointed out, some with the help of the good folks at Wikipedia, the winning candidate in that primary was Rep. Albert Gore, Sr., whose slogan "Think Some More – Vote for Gore," helped propel him to the Senate, and probably indirectly boosted the political fortunes of his son, future vice president Al Gore, Jr.

In journalist Bill Turque's 2000 book "Inventing Al Gore," the elder Gore credited his wife, Pauline LaFon Gore, for penning the slogan. "Mrs. Gore and I came home one Saturday night after a hard day of campaigning, and she cleaned off the kitchen table and made a pot of coffee and said, 'Well, Albert, sit down here....' So we wrote doggerels and rhymes and riddles and finally came to one that we thought would work."

More than 150 of you came up with the correct answer, but as our rules stated, in the event of a 150-way tie, the winner of the "CNN Mardi Gras 2006" bead necklace and pendant would be selected at random by our now-former intern Josh Lipsky. Josh has chosen, and the lucky winner is (dramatic pause) Scott "No relation to Bill" Schneider of New Orleans, Louisiana. We realize it seems a little odd, perhaps even unfair, that the winner of a commemorative Mardi Gras bead necklace would go to someone whose access to beaded Mardi Gras paraphernalia would be greater than that of the average world citizen, but former intern Josh has already packed his bags.

Although we only have one beaded necklace to spare this time, we would like to recognize a few honorable mentions for their contributions:

FIRST RESPONDER: Brad Coker of Mason-Dixon Polling clocked in with the very first correct answer a mere eight minutes after the question was posted.

STRAIGHT FROM THE GORES' MOUTH(S): "Pastor Don" Clifford of Brandon, Minnesota, says he first heard the story from the senior Gore himself during a 1968 speech at Concordian Senior College in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Chris Clarke of Hendersonville, Tennessee, heard the tale from Karenna Gore Schiff at a book signing.

LONG-DISTANCE GRINDERS: The correct answer that traveled the furthest was from Ben Gray of Perth, Western Australia. A distant but still respectable second place goes to Tom Dart of Belfast, Northern Ireland.

MOST DISAPPOINTED: Some of you really, really wanted to win. Fred Weber of Chicago, Illinois, casually mentioned in his response that Friday was his birthday. Dustin McCracken of McLean, Virginia, wrote "Like Josh, my last day of interning is [Friday], so I think we both need some CNN beads to take back to school for the inevitable Mardi Gras party." And Dennis Barrett of Syracuse, New York, said simply, "I really need that necklace." (We won't ask why.) But none wanted it more than Misha Leybovich of Irvine, California, who wrote, "Can't wait for my 'CNN Mardis Gras 2006' bead necklace and pendant. I think I might even wear it to my buddy's wedding."

WRONGEST ANSWER: Ed McClanahan of Lexington, Kentucky, was farthest off the mark, but deserves a prize for originality. He wrote: "Senator McKellar was defeated by Estes Kefauver, who ran on a birth-control platform. His slogan: 'Bestest Keepoffher. Vote Estes Kefauver."


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