October 21st, 2007
08:38 AM ET
7 years ago

Clinton: I'm no frontrunner in Iowa

Sen. Hillary Clinton, D-New York, campaigned in Iowa Saturday.

DES MOINES, Iowa (CNN) – Democratic White House hopeful Sen. Hillary Clinton, D-New York, said Saturday that she looks at her campaign as if she were "ten or twenty points behind."

Clinton–ahead in the latest national polls by as much as 30 points–made the comments to reporters when asked if she considers herself the frontrunner in Iowa, a state where she holds a much smaller lead.

"No," Clinton said. "I consider myself someone who's working as hard as I can everyday to earn the support of Iowans, and that's what I'm going to keep doing."

"I'm well aware that no one has voted. No one has caucused. We have a long way to go before that happens and I don't take anything for granted."

In the latest Des Moines Register poll among 399 likely Democratic caucusgoers Clinton was in the lead in the Hawkeye State with 29 points. Former Sen. John Edwards, D-North Carolina, sat at 23 points, and Sen. Barack Obama, D-Illinois followed closely with 22. The margin of error was plus or minus 4.9 percentage points.

-CNN Iowa Producer Chris Welch

soundoff (161 Responses)
  1. Forsure Boston MA

    real Presidents don't Cackle.

    October 20, 2007 07:45 pm at 7:45 pm |
  2. Dave, Cheverly, MD

    This is not comparing any Candidate with Dean. But one must ask WHOM are they polling to be this far off the results?
    NO Campaign should be celebrating yet..

    SEPT – DEC 2003 IOWA Poll:

    Dean polls 38%
    Kerry 17%.
    Edwards 12%

    Kerry WINS IOWA 38%
    Dean Iowa 18%

    SEPT – DEC 2003 NEW HAMPSHIRE poll:

    Dean Poll 45%
    Kerry 20%.
    Edwards 2%

    Kerry WINS NH 39%
    Howard Dean 12%
    Edwards 32%

    October 20, 2007 07:59 pm at 7:59 pm |
  3. pam Eugene Or

    CNN
    Why to you put so much faith in these polls of 307 and 399 people?
    Come on!
    She is correct for once saying she is no front runner. She slimed in thru the back with her illegal money.
    Obama 08

    October 20, 2007 08:27 pm at 8:27 pm |
  4. Jesse, Burnsville, MN

    If Clinton wins the nomination, it will be Republican vs. Republican Light. I'm hopeful, however, that once people start to realize that Clinton would be a continuation of Washington as usual, they will seek a change. To be honest, Obama, Edwards, Richardson, and Biden would all create positive change. We don't need to be run anymore by the Bush/Clinton dynasty.

    October 20, 2007 08:34 pm at 8:34 pm |
  5. my911call, Wilmington, NC

    Hillary Clinton bashing is NOT going to change the people's minds. She has been under constant bashing since she started to run for president. She makes her speeches and gives her view on the various subjects. The people are listening and their instincts are telling them that she is the one.
    After Bush (twice), the people are smarter now. They are not falling for the bashing trick any more. This is why Hillary is still ahead in the polls even after all the bashing. She will try to put into motion what the people desire and need.

    October 20, 2007 08:35 pm at 8:35 pm |
  6. Jesse, Burnsville, MN

    For 25 out of my 29 years on this planet, a Bush or a Clinton has been President or Vice President of the United States. That is pretty scary and doesn't sound healthy for our country. Come on people..let's see what can come of some positive change for this country.

    October 20, 2007 08:39 pm at 8:39 pm |
  7. Marko Dezdri, Portland, OR

    Hillary Clinton is a smart woman. Her status as a front runner will not stop the hard work she's doing. She has been proven thru the fire many times and has come on top. She has the experience, the passion, the knowledge and the temper to be President and stand strong in the world arena. She has something no other candidate has: credibility in the international arena. People around the world respect her and listens to her. That;s what we need now.

    October 20, 2007 08:41 pm at 8:41 pm |
  8. Carol, California

    Who are these pollsters talking to? I haven't spoken to one person that would vote for her. She is not the next president (thank God). The Democrats made all kinds of promises when they got the majority in Congress, but they have not delivered one thing. They wimp out, and whine, then write letters to radio talk show hosts to show how tough they are. This is going to come back to haunt her. The Dems had it all handed to them and they screwed it up again. If they nominate her, that will be their next mistake. Anybody but Hillary.....

    October 20, 2007 08:44 pm at 8:44 pm |
  9. james,nyc,ny

    Ya, keep lying! She is a front runner of CNN headlines till people proof the media wrong. I hope she won't scream like dean!

    October 20, 2007 08:44 pm at 8:44 pm |
  10. brenda,ks,mo

    Go Obama!

    October 20, 2007 08:45 pm at 8:45 pm |
  11. SB

    Once again, Hillary Clinton holds her finger up in the wind and responds accordingly.

    October 20, 2007 08:47 pm at 8:47 pm |
  12. jim,holden,ma

    Clinton: I'm no frontrunner in Iowa
    Sen. Hillary Clinton, D-New York, campaigned in Iowa Saturday.
    DES MOINES, Iowa (CNN) – Democratic White House hopeful Sen. Hillary Clinton, D-New York, said Saturday that she looks at her campaign as if she were "ten or twenty points behind."

    Clinton–ahead in the latest national polls by as much as 30 points–made the comments to reporters when asked if she considers herself the frontrunner in Iowa, a state where she holds a much smaller lead.

    "No," Clinton said. "I consider myself someone who's working as hard as I can everyday to earn the support of Iowans, and that's what I'm going to keep doing."

    "I'm well aware that no one has voted. No one has caucused. We have a long way to go before that happens and I don't take anything for granted."

    In the latest Des Moines Register poll among 399 likely Democratic caucusgoers Clinton was in the lead in the Hawkeye State with 29 points. Former Sen. John Edwards, D-North Carolina, sat at 23 points, and Sen. Barack Obama, D-Illinois followed closely with 22. The margin of error was plus or minus 4.9 percentage points.

    -CNN Iowa Producer Chris Welch

    October 20, 2007 08:48 pm at 8:48 pm |
  13. Kelly Mesa AZ

    I am a 23yr old lesbian from Ny who now lives in Arizona with my girlfriend of 6 years. I've never been much into politics but as I find myself getting a little older I'm worried that because of people like our presidential candidates that I will never be able to get married. Which really disturbs me. So I went looking around today on a few websites to see where I would HAVE to get married, and since I can't get married in my own country I now will have to go to Canada and then what's the point? I thought this was a free country. Wasn't that very fact instilled into my head since the day I was born? That America was great because you could be who you were without having to worry about anyone chastizing you for it. Apparently I was told wrong. Other than that, I don't care. I don't care about immigration laws because we're all immigrants anyway so who cares. I don't care about taxes because by the time I get them back, I'll probably already be dead. I don't care about abortion since no one will let lesbian couples adopt. It all boils down to this and I know I'm not the only one.. If you don't care why should I?

    October 20, 2007 08:48 pm at 8:48 pm |
  14. Peter,nyc,ny

    Democratic White House hopeful Sen. Hillary Clinton, D-New York, said Saturday that she looks at her campaign as if she were "ten or twenty points behind."

    October 20, 2007 08:54 pm at 8:54 pm |
  15. richard,nyc,ny

    LAS VEGAS (AP) — Democrat John Edwards blamed Bill Clinton's administration Saturday for trade agreements unpopular with labor unions and warned against electing "corporate Democrats."

    The Democratic presidential hopeful, speaking to union carpenters, tied rival Hillary Rodham Clinton to the business interests that unions claim were served by her husband's trade
    liberalization, to the detriment of workers.

    Edwards described the North American Free Trade Agreement as a blow to the middle class that President Clinton put in place while the first lady was failing in her mission to reform health care.

    "In the 1990s, we didn't get universal health care, which we needed," he said. "We got NAFTA, which we didn't need.

    "I think we've been asking the wrong questions about these proposed trade deals," he added. "The question seems to have been, 'Is this trade deal good for the profits of big multinational corporations?"

    Edwards said his administration would ask, "Is this trade deal good for jobs and for working, middle-class America?"

    The former North Carolina senator says he would renegotiate the 1993 deal that lowered trade barriers among the U.S., Canada and Mexico.

    New York Sen. Clinton said recently that trade agreements, including NAFTA, should be reviewed every five years to make sure "they're meeting their goals or to make adjustments if they are not."

    Edwards described the stakes of the presidential race in stark terms, asking the crowd if they want to live in a country made up of "a few rich people and everybody else." He suggested his Democratic rivals would not serve the interests of workers.

    "Do you want to trade a crowd of corporate Republicans that are running this country now for a crowd of corporate Democrats?" he asked. "That's not us."

    Edwards is depending on the carpenters union in Nevada to help drive turnout in the Jan. 19 caucuses.

    The local union and its international endorsed him in August. The union has 12,000 members in Nevada, although many are Republicans or nonpartisans.

    Edwards met privately with members of another large Nevada union during his campaign stop in the state, his 14th since launching his presidential campaign. The Service Employees International Union, with about 17,000 members in Nevada, says it is considering endorsing Edwards, Clinton or Illinois Sen. Barack Obama.

    October 20, 2007 08:58 pm at 8:58 pm |
  16. david,manchester,NH

    WASHINGTON (CNN) — Former Mayor Rudy Giuliani, R-New York, spoke before the Family Research Council's Values Voter Summit Saturday telling the Christian based crowed "you have nothing to fear from me."

    The White House hopeful came to the event facing opposition for his stance on abortion rights. He addressed the issue head on saying that he would continue the model he used while mayor of New York to "increase adoptions and decrease abortions."

    Giuliani, who supports abortion rights, said he would continue to support the ban on partial birth abortions, support parental notification laws, and support the Hyde amendment, which denies federal funding for abortions. He would also make the $10,000 tax credit for adoptions permanent and "cut the red tape" involved in the adoption process. He continued by saying he would make judicial appointments in the mold of Chief Justice John Roberts, Justice Anthony Scalia, Justice Clarence Thomas, and Justice Samuel Alito, who are the most conservative members of the Supreme Court.

    The former mayor told the audience that he came before them "with an open mind and an open heart, and all I ask is that you so the same."

    But he also made it clear the he would not "pretend that I can be all things to all people."

    He emphasized that he would not change his beliefs in order to tell them what they wanted to hear and at the same time made a veiled attack on his Republican rival Mitt Romney.

    "For me to twist myself all up, to try to figure out exactly what you want to hear, and today say one thing and tomoorow say another thing, and a year from now, if you do that too long, you lose the sense of what leadership is all about," said Giuliani.

    "Isn't it better that I tell you what I really believe," Giuliani asked the audience, "instead of pretending to change all of my positions to fit the prevailing winds?"

    Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney at one time supported abortion rights but has since reversed his position on the issue.

    Giuliani later reinforced his belief in God saying, "my belief in God and reliance on His guidance is at the core of who I am."

    October 20, 2007 09:01 pm at 9:01 pm |
  17. Canadian Observer

    Marco...Where did you find figures that prove that people around the world respect Hillary Clinton? Most people I know think it is bizarre that two families in power for over 20 tearsis the best 300 000 people can do...not to mention the nuts, and dangerous men, running for the Republicans...Bill Clinton is respected for his humanitarian aid after being president..I doubt if that translates into views about his wife.

    October 20, 2007 09:02 pm at 9:02 pm |
  18. Cindy from Ohio

    I am a little confused too. I have never been polled either. Although I am a supporter of Hillary Clinton. I never trust polls because they interview like 400 people and based on that project what the rest of the population thinks. I think all the polls saying Clinton is the frontrunner by far is going to hurt her in the end because a lot of people will not even bother voting (for her or anyone else) because they think she has it locked up already so they would consider it a waste of time. I do not care what polls say, I am going to vote in the primary and hopefully in the general election for Hillary Clinton.

    P.S. All these people who keep saying "I have never met anyone who is for Clinton", you obviousily do not know anybody or you are in a social group that does not allow people with different opinions in. I know a lot of people who are for Clinton, a lot for Obama, and quite a few for Ron Paul. Maybe you people need to open your eyes and your life to differing opinions.

    Clinton 08'

    October 20, 2007 09:10 pm at 9:10 pm |
  19. Sam, Lutz, FL

    This is ridiculous. Hillary is so popular because the MEDIA is making her popular. No other candidate gets as much air time as her. Why? Because Hillary is exactly like Bush. When she becomes president, she will rake in the bucks by going to war with Iran. As long as that happens, huge corporations like Turner and NewsCorp will also be raking in the bucks.

    The whole system in this country makes me sick. And oftentimes (lately) CNN has been making me sick. The only genuine candidates whom I see are Kucinich and Gravel, but neither of them will get the attention that they truly deserve, since they don't want war and they consider the U.S. a nation AMONG other nations (as opposed to ABOVE other nations).

    October 20, 2007 09:10 pm at 9:10 pm |
  20. Dave, Cheverly, MD

    To Kelly Mesa, AZ:

    Sweetie.. This is NOT the time to make such an issues as your whole "except me cause I'm gay thing". It just aint the time for that. Sometimes it is ok to just sit in the back of the room and keep quiet! That Gay issue cost the Democrats the 2004 election. I know you don't care about that. But we are talking about saving the Entire country and the free world this year. Ok!!??

    October 20, 2007 09:17 pm at 9:17 pm |
  21. Anonymous

    Hillary is saying this as she knows Obama truly has more support than she does. she's nervous.

    October 20, 2007 09:26 pm at 9:26 pm |
  22. A.Thomas, new york, NY

    Once again, she dispels Obama's and Edawrds'repeated allegation that she considers herself as a front runner. As a true leader, she is "working as hard as I can everyday to earn the support of Iowans, and that's what I'm going to keep doing."

    Dave of Chevely once agin put out some 2004 poll numbers with the intentsion showing that Hillary is like Howard Dean of 2004. Well, as I pointed out weeks ago about his error, Dave has failed to know the following advantages that Hillary has, and Howard Dean didnt have:

    a) She has the most effective (high poll number) and efficient (least spent on $ raised)campaign machine of all candidates.

    b) She has most money raised, and on hand, of all candidates to get her messages to voters.

    c) This is the clintons' 3rd bid for president, and they won the first two.

    d) Hillary is leading in national and state polls over other dem candidates by a big margin, and her lead surges recently.

    e) Hillary will win all blue states, most purple states, and may grap a few red states (at least arizona). This cannot be said by obama or edwards (or howard dean of 2004). She does not to have paint the whole america blue to become the next president; all she needs is one more state than John Kerry.

    f) She has the most support from womenen than any candidates, when half of the voters are women.

    g) She also has more supports from the blacks than the black candidate, Obama.

    I see that the supporters of obama and edwards, like their candidates, do not believe in polls, and disagree the above facts, but their constant state of denial is bad for their mental health.

    October 20, 2007 09:41 pm at 9:41 pm |
  23. Donna

    You can bet that the Clinton campaign has done some polling and has figured out that the voters don't appreciate Hillary acting like the election has already been decided. So - poof - humble Hillary. Every word, action, inaction and laugh is a calculation. Has she spoken out about the FISA telecom amnesty bill yet? Working hard for us huh?

    October 20, 2007 09:47 pm at 9:47 pm |
  24. Corbett, Seattle WA

    God this happened to both parties in the '04 season. I hated it then and I hate it now. Its the part when the frontrunners who are up 20 to 30 points and $5 to $10 million try to convince everybody that they have somehow slipped into underdog status and will only have a fighting chance if the troops rally.

    Its embarassing, insulting and stupid.

    October 20, 2007 09:56 pm at 9:56 pm |
  25. mountain man Longmont, CO

    Dave I don't know where you got that 03 Poll but it is completly wrong! I was in IA in 03 and Dean and Gephardt were neck and neck in IA all the way up until Husien was captured then things started to break for Kerry. If you have a point to make about this campaign say it without misrepresenting the facts.

    October 20, 2007 09:59 pm at 9:59 pm |
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