December 7th, 2007
03:22 PM ET
7 years ago

Huckabee: I didn't watch Romney speech

Huckabee said he would put his own Christian twist on a "God speech."

BLUFFTON, South Carolina (CNN) – Speech? What speech?

Mike Huckabee said Friday he did not watch the speech on faith given by former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, but offered lukewarm praise for what he had heard about Romney's comments.

The former Arkansas governor said from what he had heard, Romney "seemed to have done an excellent job."

But the Baptist minister argued that he has been confronted with questions about his faith more than Romney has, and that he would make a "God speech" too if given the airtime.

"I get all of the God questions at the debates, so you know when people say, 'Oh, he had to make a speech,' I'm thinking, 'Hey you know what? If you'll give me national television time, I'll make you a God speech, and I'll tell you what I'll do, I'll throw in an offering and an altar call to throw in with it.'"

Huckabee was speaking with reporters after attending a fundraiser here.

– CNN South Carolina Producer Peter Hamby


Filed under: Mike Huckabee • Mitt Romney • South Carolina
soundoff (43 Responses)
  1. Bill , Covington,LA

    Governor Huckabee, slick willie clinton, Hillary, Arkansas, need I say More? be careful what you vote for, you may get it, then what?

    December 7, 2007 09:00 pm at 9:00 pm |
  2. Tom Dedham, Mass

    And which debates are those, Huckabee?? From what I saw, Romney by far got asked the most. Sure, Huckabee tried hard to jump in and take whatever ones he could, but that was by his own choice. Likewise, Romney gave this speech because he needed to. He has never tried to use religion as a tool to propel his success. Huckabee? Well, that's a given.

    Posted By Mac Reynolds, Los Angeles, CA : December 7, 2007 4:16 pm

    Very well put Mac, and unlike you NPR watching tools, I know what Mac says is the truth, as Romney was my Governor and he NEVER, EVER used his religoun to make a point or buy favor.

    You can't say the same about the MSM media flavor of the month Huckabee.

    As a Conservative leaning Christian, but A NON BIBLE THUMPER, if Huckabee gets the nomination, my party deserves to lose and I will gladly vote for Biden or Obama.

    December 7, 2007 09:19 pm at 9:19 pm |
  3. Apollo, Seattle, WA

    The huckster doesn't have to watch it because he has his hatchet workers out attacking Romney for him (push poll phone calls, bigotted propoganda, etc. etc.)

    I know that the media likes to play up the issue of needing the religious right, well, like it or not, Mormons (up until now) have formed a portion of this broad-based coalition.

    What happens if now, after months of hearing non-stop biggoted slurs hurled at them Mormons simply don't vote in the next election, or vote for a democrat?

    You say it couldn't happen? Well, Sen. Reid is Mormon and a Democrat.

    You say that it won't affect the presidential race? Huckster, if nominated (God Forbid!) will not win in New Mexico, Nevada (Vegas was founded by Mormons, you know), Colorado because the hundreds of thousands of Mormons in those three states will not vote for an anti-Mormon bigot. Throughout Mormon history, they have stood up to bigots like him, and will not tolerate his intolerance and his supporters' open hostility.

    NV, NM, CO. If those go purple or blue...it's over. What about the 750,000 Mormons in California? Could there be a few more congressional seats lost? Even Id. could vote for a third party libertarian.

    AZ.? Might lose some more congressional seats. WA. (250,000) same...Oregon (where Bush lost in 2000 by a couple thousand votes?) the 140,000 Mormons will turn away.

    Members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints will put up with a lot, but the lies and continued bigotry has gone too far. The Huckster has pushed them out of the 'tent'

    December 7, 2007 10:47 pm at 10:47 pm |
  4. Angela Wpb, Fl

    Wow, Huck sounds like he's auditioning to become a host of a God game show.

    December 8, 2007 12:34 am at 12:34 am |
  5. John Allen

    What? Huck tuned out Governor Romney's speech on faith in America? For a former pastor who literally brands himself "The Christian Candidate," it is difficult to comprehend that Huck did not watch Romney's speech. It's shocking actually. I mean what kind of a pastor would purposely miss what turned out to be perhaps the most inspiring speech on American religion in recent memory? I can only assume that Huck was jealous of all the attention Romney was getting and couldn't stand any more of it, or else he secretly did watch The Speech and doesn't want to admit it. In either case, it's yet another disappointing performance by a candidate who's got a lot more bark than bite.

    December 8, 2007 01:55 am at 1:55 am |
  6. Jerimiah, South Carolina

    Amen! to all of these comments

    December 8, 2007 02:42 am at 2:42 am |
  7. Alice Newman Center Harbor NH

    "i didn't watch it either huck.
    Posted By anonymous" ....

    Which means that you can't form an intelligent opinion on what you saw ... just like Mike. Ignorance is not bliss anymore ... for either of you...

    BTW, why not post your comments under your name? uniformed and no name? Who are you voting for?

    December 8, 2007 06:29 am at 6:29 am |
  8. That Guy

    Alice

    Anon never tried to form an opinion on what he didn't see.

    I didn't watch it either.

    Why do you care what his name is? or who he's voting for?

    December 8, 2007 10:05 am at 10:05 am |
  9. Tannim

    While Slick Willard pontificates maure on religion, and while Huckabee is exposed as a hypcritical fraud, one man doesn't alk much about his religion and chooses to live it instead: Dr. Paul. No speeches or apologies needed for this man, a devout Christian married 50 years and a great-grandfather, pro-life, baby doctor, anti-death penalty, anti-war, and pro-peace.

    Romney was trying to be JFK. Unfortunately Lloyd Bensten is no longer alive to put the MittWit in his proper place.

    December 8, 2007 11:44 am at 11:44 am |
  10. Steve S., Louisville KY

    I'm not sure if cocky is the word for Huckabee but rather bold. I think he's the best thing in the last 20 years. I'm not sure everybody caught his humorous spin with the reference to an altar call and offering. He's great and has got solid character too. You probably cannot put moral and other candidates names in the same sentence.

    As far as the seperation of church and state, for anyone who believes strongly in God, trying to seperate the two would be like trying to seperate your heart from decision making. Often, you just cannot do it. I think the physical church and state ought to be different but how people personally use it in their moral decision making is up to them. If a person professes to believe in God but does not consider God while making decisions (ultimately because they are accountable to God) then they really do not believe in anything at all and are a liar.

    December 8, 2007 11:51 am at 11:51 am |
  11. Ashley, Foxworth, MS

    Why would anyone want Huck to give a speech on religion? It is the evangelicals like him that demanded Romney give his speech. It is sad that Romney is under fire for his personal religion. His speech was great but should not have been needed much less demanded. We should judge these candidates based on their character, experience, political stances, etc.
    By the way: that collection plate remark was way out of line. Shame on you sucky Huck!

    December 8, 2007 01:13 pm at 1:13 pm |
  12. Independent in IA

    To those of you who would vote for this religious nut, I would suggest you read Margaret Atwood's novel "The Handmaid's Tale", surmising events following the establishment of a Christian Theocracy, which is what Huckabee advocates. Makes the Taliban look like children compared to his vision.

    December 8, 2007 03:00 pm at 3:00 pm |
  13. Chris, Bethesda, Maryland

    When have not made a "God speech?" When have you not had airtime?

    December 8, 2007 03:39 pm at 3:39 pm |
  14. David, Encinitas, CA

    Brad,

    After enduring all the name calling from folks like you for the last decade, it's hardly surprising that people like Frank have alot of bottled up frustration. I was raised to believe that being "liberal" was a good thing, that helping people who needed it was a good thing, that keeping religion away from government and at the same time keeping individual rights and freedoms intact and protected from government – was also a good thing. So get off your high horse. People in this country have a constitutional right to be conservative, liberal, religious or atheist, and can be any of the above or none and still be patriotic and love their country. Show a little respect to others and then maybe you can expect the same back.

    Oh, and BTW, I've read your posts, and you might want to remember the saying that people living in glass houses should not throw stones.

    December 9, 2007 01:44 pm at 1:44 pm |
  15. Charles in Salt Lake City, UT

    Didn't watch Romney's speech? Well, tell him he didn't miss much.

    Having had time to finally digest Mr. Romney's much anticipated "faith" speech myself, I have to state the obvious: This will not be remembered as one of the great speeches of history.

    I realize he probably meant well, but when he said words to the effect that "religion requires freedom and freedom requires religion," Romney in one fell swoop managed to disenfranchise the liberty of every American who chooses to live their life without a religious faith system — and whether that condition applies to one lone individual or a considerable host, the very essence of being an American is that a person is free to make that choice and still be an American.

    But worse, Romney's remarks are but a hair's bredth from the view that "only the TRUE religion" can provide us with TRUE freedom. And if that is to be the case, whose faith or religion must we define as the "true" one? Romney's? JFK's? Pat Robertson's? Joseph Lieberman's?

    All Romney's speech has managed to do is virtually guarantee that he will not receive his party's nomination by assuring us all that he cannot possibly win in the general election.

    December 9, 2007 02:19 pm at 2:19 pm |
  16. Harold, NY, NY

    umm, please don't Mike. you're pathetic, really.

    December 10, 2007 11:19 am at 11:19 am |
  17. Steve in SC

    Independent in IA,

    First, that book is fiction! Secondly, who is asking for a theocracy? Name names please! I would consider voting for him and I don't won't a theocracy. Stop making stuff up to incite fear!

    December 10, 2007 11:59 am at 11:59 am |
  18. Ian, Elkhart Lake WI

    "I hope we answer the alarm clock and take this nation back for Christ."
    – Mike Huckabee

    Hmm, sounds like theocracy to me. How do you spin it?

    December 10, 2007 02:30 pm at 2:30 pm |
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