December 14th, 2007
01:32 PM ET
7 years ago

Poll: Clinton's lead vanishes in New Hampshire

Obama has a 1 point lead over Clint in New Hampshire, according to a new poll.

WASHINGTON (CNN) - Democrat Hillary Clinton has lost her once-comfortable lead over rival Barack Obama in the crucial primary state of New Hampshire, according to a poll released Friday.

In the new poll conducted by the Concord Monitor, Obama surpasses the New York senator by 1 percentage point: 32 percent to 31 percent. Meanwhile, John Edwards comes in a distant third with 15 percent support among likely Democratic voters, while Bill Richardson is fourth with 7 percent.

Speaking to reporters in Iowa Friday, Clinton commented on several recent polls both in Iowa and New Hampshire that show she is tied with Obama.

"I guess I've been in enough campaigns over a lot of years to know that there is no predictability and there certainly is no inevitability," she said. "You have to get out and work for every single vote. That's what I have always done. I don't know any other way to do it."

Meanwhile, at a separate event in Iowa, Obama commented on his rise in the polls, saying, "people are receptive to this message of change."

"I am confident in my ability to lead this country," he said. "And increasingly we are doing well. Not just here in Iowa but across the country."

Obama's chances of success in the Granite State will likely hinge on how many independents show up at the polls. Unlike many states, New Hampshire allows unaffiliated voters to vote in either the Republican primary or the Democratic primary - an allowance that often can give a boost to candidates who are viewed as outside their party establishment.

Of independent voters who are likely to vote in the Democratic primary, the poll shows Obama has a wide lead over Clinton, 40 percent to 23 percent. Meanwhile Clinton holds the lead over Obama when it comes to registered Democrats in the state, 36 percent to 27 percent.

The poll also shows Obama is making inroads with women in the Granite State. The Illinois senator now edges out Clinton in that demographic, 34 percent to 32 percent.

The poll carries a margin of error of plus or minus 4 percentage points.

– CNN Ticker Producer Alexander Mooney

soundoff (126 Responses)
  1. Robb, New York

    I hope and pray that this is a sign of things to come. The heir apparent to the White House is looking pretty vulnerable now. The truth is finally coming out. And all the queen's horse and all the queen's men couldn't put Hillary's lead back together again. Let's hope that the people, not the politicians, win out in Iowa, New Hampshire and elsewhere.

    December 14, 2007 12:44 pm at 12:44 pm |
  2. Patrick,NH

    If the democrats were smart, they would line up behind Obama now. He is the candidate who represents some kind of change from the failing establishent - and their failing party. This is their only chance to really bring some momentum into the white house. If they don't do it now, it's over for them.

    December 14, 2007 12:44 pm at 12:44 pm |
  3. Rob,va

    4 years of Bill in the White House with no official responsibilities and unlimited free time ... I don't think DC is ready for that.

    December 14, 2007 12:44 pm at 12:44 pm |
  4. Zack,MI

    I hope that all the"yellow dog Dems"" will demand the most electable ticket of Al Gore and Barack Obama. I do not care how much money Hillary can raise, she can not be elected. The "swift boaters" have too many accepted lies to use against her. Al Gore won once and can win again, so is Obama!

    December 14, 2007 12:45 pm at 12:45 pm |
  5. Robert, Vivian, La

    I'm so sick of polls! Why not just do a constantly running poll where we can check the up to the milisecond results?

    The only poll that counts is the elections.

    Obama is this year's Howard Dean.

    The democrats will vote for the safe establishment candidate like they always do. GOP will vote for the safe, pro-life candidate they always choose.

    December 14, 2007 12:47 pm at 12:47 pm |
  6. Ron, NJ

    YAY!!
    Obama will win Iowa, New Hampshire and SC.
    It'll be like dominoes. Right now they are about tied. He will win Iowa, that boost along with Independant support will carry New Hampshire.
    With two significant wins Baracks boost will grow thus turning tied polls into break out leads.

    Note about the "comeback kid" scenerio. That was unique to that election. Tom Harkin...who is Iowas senatorial god made Iowa completely unviable and didn't count for anything. No one ran there because of Harkins dominance. Clinton campaigned hard in NH and then won, which gave him the boost to win.
    It'll be that way for Barack, winning Iowa and propelling him through the bulk of the rest of the states.

    December 14, 2007 12:49 pm at 12:49 pm |
  7. Tom, San Francisco

    Hillary is the person we need as president at this point. Obama can work as a trainee in her adminstration and then run for office in 2016.

    December 14, 2007 12:57 pm at 12:57 pm |
  8. dan

    The more people pay attention to the elections the less people will be impressed with Hilary Clinton. She is a nepotist candidate who doesn't stand for anything except getting elected

    December 14, 2007 12:58 pm at 12:58 pm |
  9. Bob,nyc,ny

    Obama has an army of under the radar supporters who are growing by the day, as they pay attention and he makes them understand change is within their power and their decisions.

    Black folks are listening when he talks of real issues of education, family values and responsibility. Yet all we hear is "they love Clinton" an empty, patronizing, degrading rhetoric.

    or

    could it be the reason they are so badly off foolishly being taken for a ride by the Clintons who would rather babysit them than put a mirror infront of their faces for some self reflection?

    December 14, 2007 01:06 pm at 1:06 pm |
  10. Rob

    Hahahahahahahahaha! Is this the fun part Hillary? Obama 08!

    December 14, 2007 01:08 pm at 1:08 pm |
  11. Salita, SC

    At this point Hillary should be slippin in the polls...70-80% bad/jealous/spiteful press will do that to you. Question still remains: Can Obama win the general election in the real country of America in 2008? Answer for me....NO! if he could then Tennessee would have a Senator with the last name FORD!

    Dems dont be stupid Republicans already admit they wont beat Hillary....Obama they know they can because using race in america works for their memebers.

    December 14, 2007 01:08 pm at 1:08 pm |
  12. joan,boston,ma

    In this discussion, "experience," whether not so good or lack thereof, seems to be the key to how electable each Dem candidate is. What about Richardson and his incredible resumé? Governor, Energy Secretary, UN Ambassador, Congressman. I think once the country gets to know him, he probably will look good. Is he vulnerable on anything?

    I think Resume don't work this time around,change in washington is the key!

    December 14, 2007 01:08 pm at 1:08 pm |
  13. vw,cat

    I think this shows that Hillary has a certain percent of soft supporters. People who say they back her because they are told on the cable news that she is inevitable and she is loved by all democrats.
    But, the democrats who are waking up and seeing that they do indeed have a choice and that there are excellent candidates who are superior to Hillary to pick.
    I am an Obama supporter and see how deep his support is. but, if someone who sees that Hillary is not the only candidate and does not want to pick Obama, I hope they look hard at the other ones. I can live very easily with any of our candidates as president as long as it is not Hillary.
    I will not vote for her at all. So, yes, this is good news. finally!

    December 14, 2007 01:11 pm at 1:11 pm |
  14. Shawn, Cincinnati OH

    I don't really like either of their positions, but in a gun to my head situation, I'll take the self-made friendly socialist(Obama, for you slow thinkers and Clintonistas out there), over the coat-tail-riding shrew socialist who's never probably never even run a lemonade stand, much less anything important(Sen D – NY? How is that a accoplishment? O.J. Simpson could run as a democrat in NY and win).

    December 14, 2007 01:11 pm at 1:11 pm |
  15. mark,boston,ma

    I would like Hillary to be the first female president. Obama will be the first black President in 2012 if hillary doesn't rerun.

    December 14, 2007 01:12 pm at 1:12 pm |
  16. Timothy,nyc,ny

    I think this shows that Hillary has a certain percent of soft supporters. People who say they back her because they are told on the cable news that she is inevitable and she is loved by all democrats.
    But, the democrats who are waking up and seeing that they do indeed have a choice and that there are excellent candidates who are superior to Hillary to pick.
    I am an Obama supporter and see how deep his support is. but, if someone who sees that Hillary is not the only candidate and does not want to pick Obama, I hope they look hard at the other ones. I can live very easily with any of our candidates as president as long as it is not Hillary.
    I will not vote for her at all. So, yes, this is good news. finally!

    December 14, 2007 01:13 pm at 1:13 pm |
  17. terrified in, fairfax, va

    Oh god, time for the rise of all the bad candidates- Huckabee... Obama, omg.

    December 14, 2007 01:18 pm at 1:18 pm |
  18. Ken,boston,ma

    It's intriguing that despite Hillary's campaign's negative diatribes and her desperation, people are listening to Obama more than ever.

    I really think her campaign is failing and will be over if she loses in IA and NH.

    People are simply too curios as to whethere Obama can do what he wants to do.

    They won't give up on him.

    December 14, 2007 01:22 pm at 1:22 pm |
  19. William, Atlanta

    I watched the debate and was thoroughly disappointed with ALL the candidates. The format, of course, was a joke, but it wasn't just the format. It was painfully apparent why the trailing candidates are so low in the polls. They had nothing watsoever to say and mostly stumbled. The big disappointments were Clinton and yes, even Obama. Clinton was polished, rehersed and completely on script. For all I knew, I could have been watching a Republican deliver empty sound-bytes. Obama was the real disappointment. While he did better than the others, he, too, was scripted and polished and it was plain that he is now being handled by political strategists. Gone was the Barack Obama, who made me sit up and take notice a few months back. The Democratic tradition of debate and discussion seems to have been killed. My only consolation is that the Republican field is in even worse shape than the Democrats. The problem is that I don't see anyone I want to be my President. All I see are candidates who have been bought and paid for.

    December 14, 2007 01:27 pm at 1:27 pm |
  20. Jessica M., El Paso, TX

    I can tell you this for a fact, Democrats in Congress are scared that Obama might be the nominee. They know that he CAN'T win the general. There is only one guy that can save the day now...Senator Edward Kennedy.
    I suspect he'll be coming out soon and endorsing Clinton.
    I agree with the poster above about all the things Republicans will be tossing at Obama if he is the nominee. Not only that, but he has shifted positions on so many issues. He's a political opportunist, and Repubs will exploit this.

    December 14, 2007 01:28 pm at 1:28 pm |
  21. Ryan, New Jersey

    The Democratic party needs to, as a whole, shift their support at least to a non-biased position now. If Obama gets the nomination they want to have been behind him from the start. I could think of a dozen VPs for Obama that could give the Dems a win in a landslide come next November, but they need to start getting behind him now!

    December 14, 2007 01:35 pm at 1:35 pm |
  22. Doug, Boston, MA

    I find myself somewhat torn – on one hand Obama is the embodiment of what politics should be and where we should go as a country. On the other hand, we are a very primitive civilization and I can't help but be amazed at Hillary's ability to work the system in a way that Obama never could. There's something to be said for that.

    There's also a lot of racists in this country. Even though Obama is a melting pot, I worry – then again, there's a lot of sexists to so maybe it's a wash.

    Boy, Edwards has certainly disappeared.

    December 14, 2007 01:37 pm at 1:37 pm |
  23. Brooke, Philadelphia, PA

    I can't believe people are saying Hillary has less experience than Obama. GIVE ME A BREAK!! Hillary will bounce back from this and win NH and Iowa. No doubt.

    GO HILLARY GO!!!!!

    December 14, 2007 01:37 pm at 1:37 pm |
  24. jean,boston,ma

    I don't post here often, and I admit that I am not pleased Clinton has managed not to consolidate her support over the past few months. However, wouldn't it benefit a supporter of another candidate to appreciate the significance of the WaPo poll, and work against it accordingly, rather than declaim or discount its results?

    December 14, 2007 01:38 pm at 1:38 pm |
  25. V.Novosad, Sugar Land, Texas

    Obama's cute little retort toward Hillary should remind us what it would be like if she is the nominee. Would she want him to advise her? I think not. Case made.

    It is so hard to imagine our electing someone whose education and experience (or lack thereof) in all things statesmanship is just about equal with the person we elected seven years ago. The only difference is that Obama can pronounce more than one syllable words, and GWB is still stumbling. One more thing. I think it would be a good move for Hillary, in order to counter the personal clout Oprah brought to the table, to ask her constituents in New York to tell the country what an excellent job she's done for them over the past seven years.

    December 14, 2007 01:39 pm at 1:39 pm |
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