January 3rd, 2008
11:12 PM ET
7 years ago

Hunter stays in GOP presidential race

(CNN) – Rep. Duncan Hunter will continue his bid for the Republican presidential nomination despite his last place finish Thursday in the Iowa caucuses, his campaign manager tells CNN.

“Absolutely, he is staying in,” Roy Tyler, the California Republican’s top aide, said in an interview late Thursday night. “We actually predicted we would not do well in Iowa. We were not expecting a lot. That is why we did not put a lot of resources into there.”

Hunter only received 1 percent support in the caucuses. The California Republican has already announced he will retire from Congress at the end of the year.

– CNN Political Editor Mark Preston

Filed under: Duncan Hunter
January 3rd, 2008
11:08 PM ET
3 years ago

Schneider: Edwards and Clinton battle for second

Who will get second place in Iowa's Democratic caucuses?

(CNN) - John Edwards is neck-and-neck with Clinton for second place, because 19 percent of Democrats said in entrance polling that it is most important to them to choose a candidate who "cares about people" – 45 percent of that demographic went to the former North Carolina senator, while 23 percent went to both Obama and Clinton

Just over half of Democratic caucus goers said change was the number one factor they were looking for in a candidate, and 51 percent of those voters chose Barack Obama. That compares to only 19 percent of "change" caucus goers who preferred Clinton.

Meanwhile, only 20 percent of Democrats said Clinton's campaign mantra - experience - was the most important attribute of a presidential candidate. Clinton won 49 percent of those voters, while Richards came in second with 20 percent.

–CNN Senior Political Analyst Bill Schneider


Filed under: Iowa
January 3rd, 2008
11:00 PM ET
7 years ago

For Clinton in Iowa - The party is over

ALT TEXT
CNN's Mike Roselli captured the mood at camp Clinton Thursday night.

DES MOINES, Iowa (CNN) – Long after the local and national TV outlets had turned away from her headquarters, Hillary Clinton was still going.

She worked the stage full of supporters that had assembled behind her. She hugged and shook hands with prominent backers such as Madeleine Albright and Terry McAuliffe and stopped to talk with Iowa surrogates who had become constants on her travels across the state. One woman decked out in full AFSCME regalia commanded the senator's attention until they were practically alone on the stage.

Sen. Clinton descended from the stage and worked the remaining fans pressed against the bunting clad ropeline, posing for pictures and signing autographs. She outlasted President Clinton, not one ever to leave a ropeline early.

Once the candidate had exited the ballroom, the campaign soundtrack looped for the umpteenth time as supporters milled about picking up signs, swilling beer, and posing for pictures at the podium where their candidate had just spoken.

–CNN Senior Political Producer Sasha Johnson


Filed under: Hillary Clinton • Iowa
January 3rd, 2008
10:52 PM ET
7 years ago

Three-way split of Iowa's Democratic delegates

CNN is projecting this split of Iowa's 45 Democratic delegates, based on tonight's results:

Barack Obama: 16, Hillary Clinton: 15, John Edwards: 14


Filed under: Iowa
January 3rd, 2008
10:52 PM ET
7 years ago

Huckabee, Romney lead GOP delegate count

CNN is projecting this split of Iowa's 37 Republican delegates, based on tonight's results:

Mike Huckabee: 17, Mitt Romney: 12, Fred Thompson: 3, John McCain: 3, Ron Paul: 2


Filed under: Iowa
January 3rd, 2008
10:51 PM ET
7 years ago

Schneider: What Obama's Iowa win could mean in South Carolina

Almost half of Democratic primary voters in South Carolina are African-American.

Almost half of Democratic primary voters in South Carolina are African-American.

(CNN) - Barack Obama just won a state whose population is less than 4 percent African-American. On January 26, he will be on the ballot in a state with a considerably higher percentage of African-Americans: South Carolina, where that demographic makes up nearly 50 percent of Democratic primary voters there.

African-Americans have been intensely loyal to the Clintons, and continue to support Hillary Clinton over Obama in the Palmetto State. But that gap has significantly narrowed in recent weeks - and with this key win tonight, it's unlikely they will stand in his way there.

– CNN Senior Political Analyst Bill Schneider


Filed under: Candidate Barack Obama
January 3rd, 2008
10:32 PM ET
7 years ago

Schneider: Obama wins the woman vote

Oprah Winfrey, who has a loyal following among women, campaigned with Sen. Obama.

Oprah Winfrey, who has a loyal following among women, campaigned with Sen. Obama.

Hillary Clinton has largely courted female voters as she battles to become the first woman president. But in what is bad news for Clinton, exit polling shows Obama beat the New York senator 35 percent to 30 percent among women caucus goers.

Clinton only won among women in the 60 years-old and over demographic. 43 percent of those women voters went for Clinton, compared to 26 percent for Edwards and 19 percent for Obama.

But the Illinois Democrat won among women in every other age demographic.

– CNN Senior Political Analyst Bill Schneider


Filed under: Candidate Barack Obama
January 3rd, 2008
10:29 PM ET
7 years ago

Source: Dodd to end presidential run

Dodd will reportedly drop out of the race.

Dodd will reportedly drop out of the race.

A senior campaign aide tells CNN that Sen. Chris Dodd is abandoning his campaign for president - an official announcement is expected shortly.


Filed under: Chris Dodd • Iowa
January 3rd, 2008
10:28 PM ET
7 years ago

Schneider: Generational revolt vs. Religious revolt

(CNN) - When it comes to the winners of both party's caucuses tonight, it's an age revolt for Democrats versus a religious revolt for Republicans.

The exit polling shows an enormous generational divide between supporters of Obama and Clinton. Fifty-seven percent of those under the age of 30 went for the Illinois Democrat. But Obama won significantly smaller proportions of each successive age group. Forty-two percent of 30-44 year-olds went for Obama. That number drops to 21 percent among 41-64 year olds, and only 18 percent among voters 65 and over.

On the Republican side, exit polling shows a great divide between those voters who highly valued a candidate's religious values and those who did not. Huckabee won 56 percent of those who said religious values matter a great deal. That number drops to 30 percent who say religion somewhat matters, 15 percent who say religion doesn't matter much, and only 5 percent among those who say religion does not matter at all.

– CNN Senior Political Analyst Bill Schneider


Filed under: Uncategorized
January 3rd, 2008
10:25 PM ET
3 years ago

Iowa caucus turnout shatters record

Caucus goers enter the Lovejoy Elementary School in Des Moines.

The Iowa Democratic Party said that with 96 percent of the precincts reporting, they were seeing record turnout, with 227,000 caucus attendees. In 2004, their turnout was about 125,000 caucus goers.

The Iowa Republican Party is also projecting record turnout, with 120,000 people taking part in the Republican caucuses. About 87,000 people took part in the 2000 Republican caucuses.


Filed under: Iowa
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