January 20th, 2008
08:30 PM ET
6 years ago

Norris: McCain may be too old for the White House

Norris is hosting a fundraiser for Huckabee at his Texas ranch.
Norris is hosting a fundraiser for Huckabee at his Texas ranch.

WASHINGTON (CNN) - Chuck Norris brought his tough-guy approach to the campaign trail Sunday, taking aim at John McCain's age and suggesting the Arizona senator might not last even a single term.

Norris, an ardent supporter of Mike Huckabee, told reporters he believes serving as president accelerates the aging process 3-to-1.

"If John takes over the presidency at 72 and he ages 3-to-1, how old will he be in four years? Eighty-four years old - and can he handle that kind of pressure in that job?" Norris said, as Huckabee looked on.

"That's why I didn't pick John to support, because I'm just afraid the vice president will wind up taking over his job within that four-year presidency," added the action star.

Huckabee himself avoided offering his own opinion on whether McCain is fit for the presidency, saying "Only John McCain and his hair dresser know for sure."

Norris, who has been at Huckabee's side for weeks as the former Arkansas governor campaigns for the presidency, is hosting a fundraiser for the Republican White House hopeful at his Texas ranch Sunday.

– CNN's Eric Fiegel and Alexander Mooney


Filed under: Mike Huckabee
January 20th, 2008
08:20 PM ET
6 years ago

Obama: I feel like I'm running against both Clintons

Obama is striking back at Bill Clinton
Obama is striking back at Bill Clinton

MYRTLE BEACH, South Carolina (CNN) - More tit-for-tat on the campaign trail – only this time, it’s between Barack Obama and Bill Clinton.

After losing the caucus tally in Nevada, the Obama campaign took aim at Bill Clinton and the comments he made during his many campaign stops in that state on behalf of his wife, Hillary Clinton.

Now the Illinois senator himself is taking on the former president, telling Good Morning America that he feels as if he’s running against both Clintons.

In the interview, Obama reportedly says that the former president has been misrepresenting both “my record of opposition to the war in Iraq” and “our approach to organizing in Las Vegas,” as the controversy over Saturday’s Nevada caucus vote continues to grow.

Obama campaign senior adviser David Axelrod did not back away from the remarks after they became public Sunday night, telling CNN the Clintons “have a good cop, bad cop thing going” in which “he comes with a negative message she stays positive.”

Axelrod accuses the former President of “doing slash and burn stuff,” and slams the Clinton campaign, saying “there’s a philosophy of saying and doing anything it takes.”

“It’s very clear that Bill Clinton is playing fast and loose with the facts,” says Axelrod, and unbecoming of a former president: “It’s been a little crass, as someone who supported him and respects him, I think it’s disappointing.”

And Axelrod vows Obama will continue to hit back. “As long as he’s out there, we aren’t going to let him distort the record,” he says. “We’ll aggressively challenge him when he misrepresents the facts.”
FULL POST

January 20th, 2008
06:15 PM ET
6 years ago

Edwards: 'I got my butt kicked'

 Edwards said Sunday he's in it for the long haul.
Edwards said Sunday he's in it for the long haul.

(CNN) - After a crushing loss in Nevada's Democratic caucuses Saturday, presidential candidate John Edwards said Sunday that he hopes "what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas."

Edwards placed a distant third in the vote, with just 4 percent of the vote, behind Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama.

“I got my butt kicked. That is what happened in Nevada,” the former North Carolina senator told Wolf Blitzer on CNN’s Late Edition. “And the job for me now is - I have learned this from my whole life experience, is when you get knocked down, you have got to get up. You have got to get up and start fighting again…

“I would kind of like to go back to the old Las Vegas saying, though. You know, ‘what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas’? I hope that turns out to be true in this case.”

Instead of campaigning in Nevada in the days before Saturday’s vote, Edwards focused instead on stumping in his birth state of South Carolina, where he won the 2004 primary.

Edwards is running a distant third in the state in most recent surveys, behind Obama and Clinton.

Saturday night, after his disappointing Nevada finish, his campaign tried to downplay the importance of results in any one state. "The race to the nomination is a marathon and not a sprint,” said Edwards’ campaign manager, former Rep. David Bonior. “The nomination won't be decided by win-loss records, but by delegates, and we're ready to fight for every delegate.”

On Sunday, Edwards continued to sound a cautious theme, saying South Carolina was “important,” but just one “part of the long process. …We will see how it goes.”

Related video: Watch Edwards' Late Edition interview with Wolf Blitzer

– CNN Associate Political Editor Rebecca Sinderbrand


Filed under: John Edwards • Nevada
January 20th, 2008
06:10 PM ET
3 years ago

Ballot Bowl Highlights

ALT TEXT

(CNN) - The presidential race remains unsettled despite voting in Iowa, New Hampshire, Wyoming, Michigan, Nevada, and the GOP primary in South Carolina.

As the 2008 White House race moves to Florida for the primaries there on January 29 and the Democratic primary on January 26 in South Carolina, CNN continues to bring you in-depth political coverage. 

If you missed any of CNN's Sunday Ballot Bowl programming, you can catch the highlights here:

Video: Watch Chuck Norris and Mike Huckabee

Video: Watch Giuliani on what he'd fix 

Video: Watch Edwards on Dr. King's legacy

Video: Watch Sen. McCain's S.C. victory speech

Video: Watch Sen. Clinton on Dr. King's legacy 

Video: Watch Fred Thompson's S.C. concession speech

Video: Watch Edwards: 'Enough is enough'

Video: Watch Romney: 'We can fix Washington'

Video: Watch Mike Huckabee S.C. concession speech

Video: Watch Sen. Obama on unity

Video: Watch Sen. McCain discuss his S.C. win with Dana Bash

–CNN Associate Producer Martina Stewart

January 20th, 2008
02:10 PM ET
6 years ago

Pop star Usher to appear at Obama rally

COLUMBIA, South Carolina (CNN) - Few people can say they've graced more magazine covers than Barack Obama - but Usher is certainly one of them. Now they'll share the same photo-op.

CNN has learned that the R&B superstar and heart-throb will appear on the same stage with Obama at a rally in Orangeburg on Tuesday evening.

An Obama spokesman said Usher won't perform at the event, but will speak about why he is supporting the Illinois senator.

It's not the first time the singer has stumped for Obama. Usher first appeared at a rally for the senator in Atlanta back in September of last year.

"I stand here representing our youth," he said at the time, reading from index cards. "If you want change you have to get involved."

In light of the Obama campaign's efforts to court young African-American voters here, the event's location at South Carolina State University is not insignificant: it's the state's largest and oldest historically black university.

Actress Kerry Washington, who starred in films like "Ray" and "The Last King of Scotland," will also be at the event.

– CNN South Carolina Producer Peter Hamby

January 20th, 2008
01:45 PM ET
6 years ago

Obama urges unity from MLK's pulpit

Obama spoke at King’s old church a day before the holiday celebrating his birth.
Obama spoke at King’s old church a day before the holiday celebrating his birth.

ATLANTA (CNN) - After a bitter few weeks on the trail, Barack Obama spent Sunday morning talking unity at Ebenezer Baptist Church, where Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. once presided.

He recalled the legacy of discrimination against African-Americans - but challenged the audience at the historic black church to take a look at a few lingering prejudices among some within the community itself.

"And yet, if we are honest with ourselves, we must admit that none of our hands are entirely clean. If we’re honest with ourselves, we’ll acknowledge that our own community has not always been true to King’s vision of a beloved community," he said, citing homophobia, anti-Semitism and anti-immigrant sentiment.

Obama told the congregation Sunday morning that if King could forgive his jailers, "surely we can look past what divides us in our time."

Obama's visit to the city coincided with his Sunday endorsement by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, which cited his "appeal across many of the lines that have divided America, adding that "both Clinton and Obama would make very good presidents, [but] Obama is the person; this is his time."

Georgia voters head to the polls February 5.

FULL POST

January 20th, 2008
01:30 PM ET
5 years ago

McCain brushes aside suggestion of weak Republican support

(CNN) – John McCain Sunday brushed aside suggestions exit polls from the South Carolina Republican primary suggest he still is failing to garner widespread support from his party's base.

"I got more votes than anybody else, and it says that I got it from across the spectrum from all over the state," McCain told CNN's Dana Bash. "We expected this to be a very highly contested race, and for the 28 years the candidate who has won South Carolina has been the nominee of the party."

The Arizona senator edged out Mike Huckabee Saturday night in the first Southern primary of the race, 33 percent to 30 percent. But according to exit polling, McCain narrowly trailed Huckabee in support from the 80 percent of primary voters who identified themselves as Republicans. Huckabee won 32 percent of their support compared to McCain's 31 percent. (McCain overwhelmingly won among the remaining 20 percent of primary voters who identified themselves as independents.)

McCain has long had difficulty currying favor from his party's conservative wing. Despite his solid voting record in the senate, many ardent Republicans have been unhappy with his past willingness to team up with liberal Sens. Russ Feingold on campaign finance reform and Ted Kennedy on immigration. McCain drew only 26 percent of the conservative vote in South Carolina Saturday.

Support from the base will be crucial in upcoming contests: McCain now faces a bevy of state primaries where independents are not allowed to participate, beginning with Florida’s vote on January 29. But the Arizona senator is predicting that his support among veterans, his economic proposals, and his record on environmental issues important to many Floridians will carry him to victory there.

Related video: Watch Dana Bash's interview with Sen. McCain

– CNN Ticker Producer Alexander Mooney


Filed under: John McCain • South Carolina primary
January 20th, 2008
12:45 PM ET
6 years ago

Clinton surrogates go to church in South Carolina

COLUMBIA, South Carolina (CNN) - Chelsea Clinton and Vernon Jordan, a longtime adviser to President Bill Clinton, quietly attended two African-American church services in South Carolina on Sunday, six days before the state's Democratic primary.

The appearances are part of the Hillary Clinton campaign's outreach toward the state's black voters, who are expected to be a crucial constituency in the primary vote. Barack Obama holds an edge over Clinton among African-Americans according to recent polls.

Chelsea Clinton attended the 11 a.m. service at Bible Way church in Columbia, whose pastor, state senator Darrell Jackson, is a member of Hillary Clinton's South Carolina steering committee.

Jordan and his wife Ann attended services at Brookland Baptist Church in West Columbia.

Hillary Clinton will make her first post-Nevada appearance in South Carolina tomorrow morning in Columbia, while Obama will hold a rally at the Columbia Convention Center tonight.

UPDATE: The Obama campaign points out that Michelle Obama also attended 11 a.m. worship services at Bible Way Church on Sunday.

– CNN South Carolina Producer Peter Hamby


Filed under: Hillary Clinton • South Carolina
January 20th, 2008
11:30 AM ET
6 years ago

Frances Lewine, trailblazing journalist, dies

 Jacqueline Kennedy, right, pours tea for AP correspondent Frances Lewine, left, in 1960.
Jacqueline Kennedy, right, pours tea for AP correspondent Frances Lewine, left, in 1960.

WASHINGTON (CNN) - Frances Lewine, who covered the White House for the Associated Press during the administrations of six presidents and spent nearly three decades as a CNN assignment editor and field producer, died Saturday of an apparent stroke. She was 86.

Lewine was regarded as a trailblazer who battled for women's rights in journalism, fighting to open the National Press Club and the Gridiron Club - a Washington journalists' organization - to women.

"It's amazing that at her age, Fran was still staking out administration and elected officials after weekend talk shows," CNN Washington Bureau Chief David Bohrman said. "All of journalism has lost a true pioneer."

Full story


Filed under: Political
January 20th, 2008
10:00 AM ET
6 years ago

McCain gets big win, but questions remain

ALT TEXT
Watch McCain's victory speech in South Carolina (Photo Credit: AP)

COLUMBIA, South Carolina (CNN) – Arizona Sen. John McCain gained an important victory Saturday in the South Carolina Republican primary, but exit polls indicate he made few inroads into the conservative heart of the Republican Party.

The results leave the race for the party's presidential nomination wide open going into the January 29 primary in Florida and the "Super Tuesday" contests beyond.

"I just would have to regard this as a good night for McCain, with some significant concerns when you get into the weeds," political analyst Stuart Rothenberg told CNN.

Full story


Filed under: John McCain
« older posts