January 20th, 2008
09:55 AM ET
6 years ago

Giuliani breaks '11th Commandment'

Giuliani is getting tough on his rivals.
Giuliani is getting tough on his rivals.

(CNN) – As the Republican race was focused on South Carolina and Nevada Saturday, Rudy Giuliani ended his longstanding observance of the famous "11th Commandment"– attacking his main rivals as he prepares for the make-or-break Florida primary in just 10 days.

He has often referred to the 11th commandment, first coined by Ronald Reagan: “Thou shalt not speak ill of any fellow Republican.”

The former New York City mayor, who has long said he would only strike at other Republicans in defense of his own record, hit Nevada victor Mitt Romney and South Carolina winner John McCain over taxes.

“I’m running against good men, some very fine, all of whom have very good motivation. But there’s a big difference,” said Giuliani at a Florida campaign event Saturday.

“I supported the Bush tax cuts. John McCain voted with the Democrats against the Bush tax cuts - twice. And Mitt Romney did not, clearly, support the Bush tax cuts.”

Giuliani has avoided the race’s early contests, and is counting on a strong showing in Florida’s January 29 primary to revive his flagging campaign. On Sunday, he will begin a two-day bus tour across the state.

The former mayor is currently locked in a four-way battle for first place in the state with Romney, McCain and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee.

– CNN Associate Political Editor Rebecca Sinderbrand


Filed under: Rudy Giuliani
January 20th, 2008
09:45 AM ET
2 years ago

Who won more delegates in Nevada? It's complicated.

 There is some confusion on who won more delegates in Nevada.
There is some confusion on who won more delegates in Nevada.

(CNN) - There are several possible answers: Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, and no one, and each answer is correct to some degree.

The purpose of Saturday’s caucuses was to elect delegates to next month’s county conventions, where delegates to the state convention in April will be chosen. It isn’t until this April meeting where the state’s 25 delegates to the national convention in Denver will actually be selected.

Hillary Clinton indisputably won the battle for county convention delegates, nabbing at least 5,300 compared to about 4,800 for Obama.

However, one could argue that Barack Obama won the battle for national convention delegates – even though no national delegates were actually awarded tonight – if you assume that the national convention delegates would be allocated in proportion to Saturday’s caucus results. CNN, the Associated Press, and other news organizations adopted this approach and estimated that Obama would go on to win 13 national convention delegates to 12 for Clinton if both candidates remained in the race by the time of the state convention in April.

But how is it possible that Clinton could win a majority of county convention delegates and not go on to win a majority of national convention delegates?

Under state party rules, Nevada’s 25 national convention delegates were divided up across Nevada’s three congressional districts. Then, the party took the additional step of dividing the Second Congressional District into three parts: Washoe county in northwestern Nevada which includes Reno; parts of Clark county in the southeast near Las Vegas; and then the rural and sparsely populated but geographically vast counties that make up the rest of the state.

Of those three subdivisions, Clinton's best showing was concentrated in the Las Vegas area in Clark county, while Obama beat her in Washoe and in the rural counties. Obama’s win in these two key areas, which were worth more national delegates than the area Clinton won, enabled him to overcome Clinton’s estimated lead in national delegates in the rest of the state.

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Filed under: Candidate Barack Obama • Hillary Clinton • Nevada
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