January 26th, 2008
07:57 PM ET
2 years ago

Exit polls: Bill Clinton's effect

 Bill Clinton has campaigned heavily for his wife.
Bill Clinton has campaigned heavily for his wife.

(CNN) - Bill Clinton's aggressive campaigning in South Carolina in the days leading up to the state's primary may have had a net negative effect among South Carolina’s Democratic primary voters, CNN exit polls indicate.

Roughly 6 in 10 South Carolina Democratic primary voters said Bill Clinton's campaigning was important in how they ultimately decided to vote, and of those voters, 48 percent went for Barack Obama while only 37 percent went for Hillary Clinton. Fourteen percent of those voters voted for John Edwards

Meanwhile, the exit polls also indicate Obama easily beat Clinton among those voters who decided in the last three days - when news reports heavily covered the former president's heightened criticisms of Obama. Twenty percent of South Carolina Democrats made their decision in the last three days and 51 percent of them chose Obama, while only 21 percent picked Clinton.

Bill Clinton's presence on the trail was "very important" to roughly a quarter of those surveyed. Among those voters, Hillary Clinton edged out Barack Obama, 46 to 42 percent.

On Monday, Obama said he felt as if he is running against both Clintons, a charge the New York senator’s campaign said was borne out of frustration. The former president himself later dismissed Obama's comments, saying “I thought he was running against me.”

Campaigning in South Carolina Friday, Obama noted that the Clinton campaign had stepped up its attacks since his Iowa win, and joked that it's good practice for him, so "when I take on those Republicans, I'll be accustomed to it."

– CNN Ticker Producer Alexander Mooney


Filed under: Exit Polls
January 26th, 2008
07:56 PM ET
7 years ago

Bill Clinton moves on to another campaign battleground

(CNN) - Bill Clinton’s impact on his wife’s presidential campaign is still being hotly debated, with exit polls out of South Carolina suggesting that his presence on the trail may have been a net negative for Hillary Clinton at the polls.

But as votes are still being counted in South Carolina, the former president is already stumping for his wife in a Super Tuesday state.

This evening, he appeared at an event in Independence, Missouri. The state, which neighbors Barack Obama's home state of Illinois, is expected to be a major battleground on February 5.

Barack Obama has already been endorsed by two of Missouri’s most high-profile Democratic women – Sen. Claire McCaskill and former Sen. Jean Carnahan, the widow of highly popular Missouri Gov. Mel Carnahan.

The state's largest paper, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, has also endorsed Obama. In a Sunday editorial posted to the paper's Web site Saturday night, it pointed to what it called "Clinton fatigue."

The paper's editorial board also backed John McCain in Missouri's Republican primary vote.

 –CNN's Candy Crowley and Rebecca Sinderbrand


Filed under: Bill Clinton • Hillary Clinton
January 26th, 2008
07:53 PM ET
7 years ago

Exit polls: Barack Obama wins among voters under age 65

(CNN) – Hillary Clinton only beat Barack Obama among elderly voters, according to CNN exit polls.

Among those voters, Clinton beat Obama by 8 points, 40 percent to 32 percent. But the Illinois Democrat easily defeated Clinton in every other bracket, and overall garnered 58 percent of the vote among 18-64 year olds. Twenty-three percent of those voters went for Clinton.

– CNN Ticker Producer Alexander Mooney


Filed under: Exit Polls
January 26th, 2008
07:51 PM ET
7 years ago

McCain gets Florida governor's endorsement

(CNN) – Florida Gov. Charlie Crist endorsed Sen. John McCain Saturday in his bid for the GOP presidential nomination.

"We have a lot of great people who are running for president this year who would all do well," Crist said at a dinner in Saint Petersburg, Florida with McCain.

"I don't think anybody would do better than the man who stands next to me, Sen. John McCain; that's an endorsement."

Later, he told reporters that "I just felt compelled to do it.  It’s just a gut call.  I think he’s the right guy."

Florida voters go to the polls to cast their ballots for the Republican nomination on Tuesday.


Filed under: Florida
January 26th, 2008
07:43 PM ET
7 years ago

CNN projects: Clinton to finish 2nd, Edwards 3rd

(CNN) - Hillary Clinton will finish second and John Edwards will finish third in the South Carolina Democratic primary, CNN projects.


Filed under: South Carolina
January 26th, 2008
07:32 PM ET
7 years ago

Florida's governor to endorse John McCain

Sources tell CNN that Florida's Republican governor, Charlie Crist, will endorse John McCain tonight.


Filed under: Florida • John McCain
January 26th, 2008
07:24 PM ET
7 years ago

Exit polls: The role of race and gender

(CNN) - At first glance, South Carolina’s Democratic electorate seems to be polarized in exit polls Saturday. The candidate with the greatest white male support was the white man on the ballot. The candidate with the greatest support from white women was the white woman in the race. And black voters overwhelmingly voted for the African-American presidential contender.

But that doesn’t mean a person’s gender or race was a reliable predictor of how they would cast their vote. John Edwards didn’t capture a majority of the white male vote, winning the support of 43 percent of that demographic. And Hillary Clinton didn’t capture a majority of the support from white women, winning 44 percent of their votes.

Barack Obama, however, captured an absolute majority of the black male vote, 82 percent. And despite speculation that black women might be torn between Obama and Hillary Clinton, 79 percent of them voted for the Illinois senator.

–CNN Associate Political Editor Rebecca Sinderbrand


Filed under: Exit Polls
January 26th, 2008
07:15 PM ET
7 years ago

Exit polls: Voters spread blame for campaign trail conflict

(CNN) - Who’s to blame for the campaign trail battles of the past few days between Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama? Half of South Carolina’s Democrats say both candidates are equally to blame, according to CNN exit polls. Of those who said one of the contenders was more to blame than the other, 21 percent blamed Hillary Clinton, and 6 percent said Barack Obama was at fault.

Among those who said both candidates were equally in the wrong, 43 percent voted for Barack Obama and 31 percent for Hillary Clinton. John Edwards, who spent the past few days positioning himself as the above-the-fray “grown-up” in the race, drew support from 26 percent.

–CNN Associate Political Editor Rebecca Sinderbrand


Filed under: Exit Polls
January 26th, 2008
07:06 PM ET
7 years ago

Exit polls: Church goers favored Obama

(CNN) – Barack Obama made reaching religious voters a major part of his South Carolina campaign. That decision seems to have paid off at the polls: among those who attend church regularly – monthly, weekly, or even more often – he captured greater support than Hillary Clinton and John Edwards combined, according to CNN exit polls.

He also won - but by a much smaller margin - among those who rarely attend church, or do not attend church at all.

–CNN Associate Political Editor Rebecca Sinderbrand


Filed under: Exit Polls
January 26th, 2008
06:59 PM ET
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