February 5th, 2008
10:31 PM ET
7 years ago

CNN projects Obama wins Minnesota

To track the Minnesota caucus results county-by-county, click here: Minnesota


Filed under: Minnesota
February 5th, 2008
10:30 PM ET
7 years ago

CNN projects Huckabee wins Alabama

To track the Alabama primary results county-by-county, click here: Alabama


Filed under: Alabama
February 5th, 2008
10:25 PM ET
7 years ago

Ballots, turnout to keep California vote counters up late

Paper ballots may delay California's Super Tuesday returns.
Paper ballots may delay California's Super Tuesday returns.

LOS ANGELES, California (CNN) - Political observers hoping to learn the outcome of California's primaries before bedding down Tuesday may need a pot of late-night coffee.

Polls close in California at 8 p.m., which means folks on the East Coast will have to stay up until 11 p.m. just to see the polls on the West Coast close.

But tallying the ballots could go well into Wednesday morning as county registrars across California are predicting record-breaking turnout.

Also, a move from electronic to paper ballots means many votes in the state will have to be counted the old-fashioned way.

Full story


Filed under: California
February 5th, 2008
10:22 PM ET
7 years ago

CNN projects Obama wins Connecticut

(CNN) – Sen. Barak Obama is the projected winner of the Democratic primary in Connecticut, going against the grain of Sen. Hillary Clinton's wins in other Northeastern states.

Exit polling indicates Obama's showing in Connecticut is due to the voting of white men, who are supporting him by a wide margin. In fact, it shows the overall white vote divided almost evenly between the two candidates.

A big difference from other nearby states is the Latino vote, which is breaking Obama's way.

Connecticut also is the home of the Independent Senator Joe Lieberman, a longtime Democrat who's endorsed Republican Sen. John McCain's bid for the White House. By a 2-1 margin, Democratic primary voters in Connecticut have an unfavorable attitude toward Lieberman. Obama is the winner among the Democrats with unfavorable views of Lieberman. Clinton won among Connecticut voters who have a favorable view of Lieberman.


Filed under: Connecticut
February 5th, 2008
10:22 PM ET
7 years ago

CNN projects Obama wins Kansas

To track the Kansas caucus results county-by-county, click here: Kansas


Filed under: Kansas
February 5th, 2008
10:20 PM ET
7 years ago

Tight race in Arizona Democratic contest

Over 50 percent of Democratic voters in Arizona's Democratic primary said Sen. Ted Kennedy's endorsement of Obama influenced them

Over 50 percent of Democratic voters in Arizona's Democratic primary said Sen. Ted Kennedy's endorsement of Obama influenced them.

(CNN) – The Arizona Democratic primary remains a tight contest between Sen. Hillary Clinton and Sen. Barack Obama, with evidence suggesting that Sen. Ted Kennedy's endorsement is helping Sen. Obama.

More than half of voters in Arizona's Democratic primary say Kennedy's endorsement of Obama was important – and those holding this view voted for Obama by a wide margin.

Exit polls also suggest the Kennedy endorsement might have been influential among the state's Latino voters, who supported Clinton but by a smaller margin than in other states.

As elsewhere, white men supported Obama over Clinton by a small margin; white women voted for Clinton over Obama by a much larger margin. Latino women likewise voted for Clinton over Obama by a large margin, while Latino men were more evenly divided in their vote.


Filed under: Arizona
February 5th, 2008
10:15 PM ET
7 years ago

Schneider: McCain benefits from Romney-Huckabee split in Missouri

The conservative vote split between Mike Huckabee and Mitt Romney is apparently helping John McCain.

The conservative vote split between Mike Huckabee and Mitt Romney is apparently helping John McCain.

(CNN) - John McCain is benefiting in Missouri from the same trend that was at play earlier in Georgia: It’s a close three-way race there thanks to the conservative vote split between Mike Huckabee and Mitt Romney. Romney and Huckabee are each drawing just over a third of the conservative vote there while McCain is only drawing a quarter.

As in other states, McCain is being aided by strong support from those who describe themselves as Independents. But he's also, surprisingly, benefiting from an issue that was supposed to be his Achilles heel: Despite Mitt Romney's efforts to portray McCain as unqualified to handle economic issues, the two men are actually splitting voters who are most concerned with the economy.

–CNN Senior Political Analyst Bill Schneider


Filed under: Bill Schneider • John McCain • Mike Huckabee • Missouri • Mitt Romney
February 5th, 2008
10:11 PM ET
7 years ago

Schneider: Democrats split by education and age

(CNN) - Beyond race and gender, national exit polls tonight are showing Democrats a varying divisions based on education and age. The more educated the voter, the more likely he or she is an Obama supporter. Conversely, the older the voter, the more likely he or she supports Clinton.

Democrats with a college degree prefer Obama, 51 percent to 41 percent. Democrats without a college degree go for Clinton 52 percent to 43 percent.

When it comes to age, Obama beats Clinton roughly 60 percent to 40 percent among voters ages 17-39. The two essentially split among voters 50-59. But Clinton is easily carrying voters over 60, 56 percent to 38 percent.

–CNN Senior Political Analyst Bill Schneider


Filed under: Bill Schneider
February 5th, 2008
10:10 PM ET
7 years ago

Scenes from the trail: Obama headquarters in Chicago

ALT TEXT

Supporters of Sen. Barack Obama erupt into to cheers when they realize CNN's Suzanne Malveaux is reporting live from Obama headquaraters in Chicago.(Photo Credit: David Allbritton/CNN)


Filed under: Candidate Barack Obama
February 5th, 2008
10:09 PM ET
7 years ago

Presidential candidates to return for Senate stimulus vote

WASHINGTON (CNN) - Senate Democratic leaders have summoned presidential candidates Sens. Hillary Clinton, D-N.Y., and Barack Obama, D-Ill., to the Senate Wednesday for a 5:45 p.m. vote on a Democratic-backed economic stimulus bill.

The measure needs 60 votes to pass and right now the outcome is too close too call, according to senators and aides on both sides of the aisle.

However, heavy lobbying from the AARP and other interest groups has raised Democratic hopes. One Republican senator who opposes the Democrats' bill - John Thune of South Dakota - told CNN the lobbying had forced Republicans to change their strategy on the issue, although most still oppose the bill.

Until Tuesday, Republican leaders pushed for an up-or-down vote on the House-passed bill, which is centered on rebate checks for low- and moderate-income taxpayers. But after the lobbying intensified, GOP leaders
said they would support providing rebate checks to more people - agreeing with Senate Democrats that low-income Social Security recipients and disabled veterans should get rebates.

But most Republicans still adamantly disagree with other parts of the Democratic bill, such as the inclusion of new unemployment benefits and assistance for energy costs for low-income households.

Republicans want to offer their own amendment but so far have been blocked by Democrats.

FULL POST


Filed under: Presidential Candidates • Senate
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