March 30th, 2008
04:00 PM ET
7 years ago

Obama supporter calls Wright race controversy good for dialogue

Rep. Lewis sung and locked hands with Sen. Obama at a church service in Selma, Alabama last year.
Rep. Lewis sung and locked hands with Sen. Obama at a church service in Selma, Alabama last year.

WASHINGTON (CNN) - Civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis, Democrat-Georgia, said Sunday that the controversy over Barack Obama's former pastor has reignited a conversation about race that could ultimately be beneficial for the country.

"The civil rights movement had the power to...what I call bring the dirt, the filth from under the American rug out of the cracks and corners, into the light so we can deal with it," said Lewis, a superdelegate who supports Obama, at a forum on faith and civil rights at Washington's National Cathedral. "Just maybe, just maybe, what is happening now will bring something out, so we all can be educated and sensitized."

While he did not mention Wright by name during a sermon he gave at the cathedral, Lewis indirectly addressed the Chicago pastor's fiery comments on race.

"During the past few days, the issue of race and the need for reconciliation have emerged through the presidential campaign. We know, and we all know, it's not a secret America had a dark past of division and separation," Lewis said. "But if we are to emerge unscarred by hate, we must learn to understand and forgive those who have been most hostile and violent towards us."

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–CNN's Rachel Streitfeld and Cody Combs

March 30th, 2008
01:15 PM ET
3 years ago

Sunday morning round-up: Should Sen. Clinton drop out?

WASHINGTON (CNN) - This week, the spirited back-and-forth between the camps of Sens. Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama led some in the Democratic Party to suggest that Clinton bow out of the race in order to unify Democrats against Sen. John McCain in the general election. The debate over whether it was time for Clinton to exit the race dominated the Sunday morning political talk show circuit.

CNN’s “Late Edition” featured a showdown between two Democratic strategists, Clinton supporter James Carville and Jamal Simmons, who backs Obama. Carville quickly downplayed any suggestion that Clinton drop out.

“The Clinton campaign has not had one one-second meeting about getting out of the race,” he told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer. “Calling on her to get out of the race is…going to hurt him in terms of getting votes. And it is going to make it more difficult to reconcile the party.”

Simmons responded that it’s the negativity coming from the Clinton campaign that’s tearing the Democratic Party apart. He said that Democrats “feel like Senator Clinton is fighting Barack Obama like he's a Republican and not fighting him like he's a fellow Democrat.”

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March 30th, 2008
12:15 PM ET
7 years ago

McCain looks ahead as Clinton and Obama duke it out

Some pundits and prominent Democrats have said recently that the they believe the unresolved Democratic race is benefiting McCain.
Some pundits and prominent Democrats have said recently that the they believe the unresolved Democratic race is benefiting McCain.

(CNN) - Sen. John McCain this week begins a bus tour of five states that he says helped shape his views and make him the politician who will carry the GOP torch in the upcoming presidential election.

The presumptive Republican nominee heads to Mississippi on Sunday, where the tour kicks off the following day.

McCain will swing through Virginia, Maryland, Florida and Arizona in the upcoming week.

According to campaign officials, the purpose of the tour is to "introduce John McCain to the American people in an intimate way," and add significance to his "remarkable American tale."

McCain is now trying to style himself as the most attractive option for voters in November, while Democratic rivals Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama are still in a delegate-by-delegate battle to become their party's nominee.

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March 30th, 2008
11:15 AM ET
7 years ago

Lieberman likens McCain to JFK

Lieberman and McCain recently went on a legislative factfinding trip to the Middle East including a visit to the Western Wall in Israel.
Lieberman and McCain recently went on a legislative factfinding trip to the Middle East including a visit to the Western Wall in Israel.

(CNN) - Sen. Joseph Lieberman, I-Connecticut, compared presumptive Republican nominee John McCain to a surprising figure on Sunday — Democratic icon John F. Kennedy.

“I'm a Democrat who came to the party in the era of President John F. Kennedy,” Lieberman told George Stephanopoulos on ABC’s “This Week. ”It's a strange turn of the road when I find among the candidates running this year that the one, in my opinion, closest to the Kennedy legacy, the John F. Kennedy legacy, is John S. McCain.”

The Democrat-turned Independent endorsed McCain in early February, surprising many in the Democratic party. Lieberman, who ran with Al Gore on the Democratic presidential ticket eight years ago, insisted that his views have remained consistent while the Democratic Party changed.

“The Democratic Party today was not the party it was in 2000. It's been effectively taken over by a small group on the left of the party that is protectionist, isolationist and basically… very, very hyperpartisan. So it pains me,” he said.

A staunch supporter of the Iraq war, Lieberman recently traveled to Baghdad with McCain and Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-South Carolina. Though he commended Hillary Clinton for her vote on declaring the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps a terrorist group, he slammed both Democratic presidential candidates on their foreign policy positions.

“The Democratic candidates have spent most of their time attacking the war in Iraq… they've honestly not done anything substantial to advance our cause in Afghanistan or against Al Qaeda.”

–CNN's Peter Lanier


Filed under: Joe Lieberman • John McCain
March 30th, 2008
11:05 AM ET
7 years ago

Kerry targets McCain and 'Republican disaster'

Sens. Kerry and McCain share an unusual history together in presidential politics.
Sens. Kerry and McCain share an unusual history together in presidential politics.

(CNN) - Stumping for Sen. Barack Obama, Sen. John Kerry faces a unique challenge when it comes to taking on the presumptive Republican nominee.

That's because Sen. John McCain has said that Kerry, in 2004, "asked if I would consider being his running mate." McCain told reporters earlier this month that at the time of the conversation, he made clear to Kerry the answer was no.

Kerry has said McCain's representatives contacted him about the possibility, and both men say there was never an actual offer.

McCain went on to campaign aggressively for President Bush in 2004.

Still, the complexity adds an unusual wrinkle for times like Sunday, when Kerry takes on McCain.

"Hillary Clinton has every right in the world to continue to fight, but the important thing is to be fighting against John McCain," Kerry told ABC's "This Week," discussing some calls for Sen. Clinton to drop out of the race.

"It is very important for both people to keep the eye on the real target - John McCain and the Republican disaster of the last seven and a half years," he added.

As the 2004 Democratic presidential nominee, Kerry is one of Obama's most prominent campaign surrogates.

–CNN's Josh Levs

March 30th, 2008
11:00 AM ET
7 years ago

Scenes from the trail: Clinton relaxes aboard plane

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CNN Political Producer Peter Hamby looks on as Sen. Clinton talks to reporters aboard her plane Sunday morning. (Photo Credit: AP)


Filed under: Hillary Clinton
March 30th, 2008
09:30 AM ET
7 years ago

Clinton rejects calls to quit Democratic race

Sen. Clinton has show no signs of ending her presidential bid despite suggestions that shenconsider doing so by prominent supporters of Sen. Obama.
Sen. Clinton has show no signs of ending her presidential bid despite suggestions that shenconsider doing so by prominent supporters of Sen. Obama.

INDIANAPOLIS, Indiana (CNN) - Sen. Hillary Clinton on Saturday rejected calls by supporters of rival candidate Barack Obama to quit the Democratic presidential race, and Obama said Clinton should remain in race "as long as she wants."

"The more people get a chance to vote, the better it is for our democracy," the New York senator and former first lady told supporters at a rally in Indiana, which holds a May 6 primary.

"There are some folks saying we ought to stop these elections," she said.

"I didn't think we believed that in America. I thought we of all people knew how important it was to give everyone a chance to have their voices heard and their votes counted."

Clinton has won primaries in the biggest states so far, but Obama has won more total contests and leads her in the race for delegates to the party's August convention in Denver - where the Democratic nominee will be formally ratified.

Two of Obama's leading supporters, Sens. Christopher Dodd and Patrick Leahy, said Friday that Clinton should rethink her chances of overcoming that deficit and consider folding her campaign.

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