April 22nd, 2008
07:17 PM ET
7 years ago

Exit polls: Clinton blamed for more unfair attacks

(CNN) – The Democratic presidential race has taken a negative turn over the last several weeks - and most Pennsylvania Democrats appear to blame Hillary Clinton.

According to the exit polls, two thirds of Pennsylvania Democrats say Clinton has launched unfair attacks against Barack Obama. Only 30 percent of voters say she hasn't.

Meanwhile, 49 percent of Pennsylvania Democrats said Obama has attacked Clinton unfairly while 48 percent say he has not.


Filed under: Bill Schneider • Exit Polls
April 22nd, 2008
07:16 PM ET
7 years ago

Exit polls: Who showed up at the polls today?

A voter casts her ballot in Butler, PA.
A voter casts her ballot in Butler, PA.

(CNN) – Who showed up to vote in the Pennsylvania Democratic primary?

The exit polls show the overwhelming majority were white (80 percent) and women significantly outnumbered men (58-42 percent.)

About 40 percent were over 60, while only 10 percent were under 30.

Nearly half came from families who earn less than $50,000 a year, while close to 25 percent came from households who made more than $100,000.

Fifty-five percent did not have a college degree; 45 percent did.

Forty-nine percent said they were liberal, 40 percent said they were moderate, and 11 percent said they were conservative.


Filed under: Bill Schneider • Exit Polls
April 22nd, 2008
07:06 PM ET
7 years ago

Exit polls: Religious voters show up in large numbers

(CNN) – Religious voters were the subject of much speculation before the Pennsylvania primary. Early exit polling shows 39 percent of today's voters attend church weekly. Fifty-nine percent of them voted for Hillary Clinton while 41 percent voted for Barack Obama. Forty-three percent of today's voters say they attend church occasionally. Of this group, 51 percent went for Clinton and 49 percent went for Obama.

Thirty-six percent of today's Democratic primary voters were Catholic. Twenty-seven percent of today's voters were Protestant. Thirteen percent descibed themselves as "other Christian." Ten percent say they have no religion and 7 percent of today's voters were Jewish.


Filed under: Bill Schneider • Exit Polls
April 22nd, 2008
07:00 PM ET
7 years ago

Obama campaign sports new t-shirts: Stop the drama, vote Obama

PHILADELPHIA, Pennsylvania (CNN) – As the Obama campaign prepared to leave Pennsylvania behind, Obama Communications Director Robert Gibbs and Strategist David Axelrod showed up for the journey sporting twin T-shirts that said in large letters: "Stop the Drama, Vote Obama."

The shorts were not exactly campaign-sanctioned items of apparel - but typical of merchandise being sold all over Philadelphia Tuesday.

It's been a phrase that's been around a while, and even showed up in a Chicago press conference a few weeks ago in slightly mutated form when Obama supporter Gen. Merrill McPeak called him "No Drama Obama."


Filed under: Candidate Barack Obama
April 22nd, 2008
06:50 PM ET
7 years ago

Obama backer on North Carolina: He 'wants to stay on the ground'

CNN

Watch Sen. McCaskill's interview with Wolf Blitzer.

(CNN) – Sen. Claire McCaskill, a supporter of Sen. Barack Obama defended Obama’s decision not to participate in a previously scheduled debate in North Carolina.

“What he wants to do is make sure the people of Indiana and North Carolina get a chance to know him,” McCaskill told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer Tuesday on The Situation Room. “So, I think he really wants to stay on the ground and make people understand that he gets it.”

Earlier in the broadcast, the Clinton campaign’s communications director, Howard Wolfson, said Obama had cancelled the North Carolina debate because of a poor performance at last week’s debate. “Sen. Obama basically said, boy, I don’t want to debate anymore,” Wolfson told Blitzer.

Indiana and North Carolina will both hold their primaries on May 6.

Related video: Watch Howard Wolfson on the Democratic race

April 22nd, 2008
06:45 PM ET
7 years ago

McCain jokes with audience about NAFTA

CNN

Watch McCain's NAFTA exchange with the audience in Youngstown, Ohio."

(CNN)— John McCain exchanged laughs with a voter at a Youngstown, Ohio campaign event Tuesday when he was asked about the troubling “four letter” word NAFTA.

“I am prone on occasion to make a mistake,” McCain told the audience member who asked the question. “The last time I checked, NAFTA is five letters.”

After a round of applause and laughter, the presumptive Republican nominee struck a more serious note, telling the crowd he understands the national discussion on the impact of the trade agreement needs to continue – re-stated his position that it had benefited the U.S. economy and the nation as a whole.

“I think the biggest problem is not so much what’s happened with free trade, but our inability to adjust to a new world economy,” McCain stressed.


Filed under: John McCain
April 22nd, 2008
06:43 PM ET
7 years ago

Exit polls: Clinton, Obama supporters want different kinds of presidents

(CNN) - As has been the case in past primary states, supporters of Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama part ways when it comes to what qualities they most want in a president.

Among Clinton supporters in Pennsylvania, 47 percent say a candidate's experience matters most, compared to 27 percent who name a candidate's ability to bring about change. Fourteen percent say they want a candidate who "cares about people."

The numbers are essentially reversed when it comes to Obama supporters. Nearly 75 percent say they want a candidate who can bring about change, 14 percent want a candidate who cares about people. Only 3 percent of Obama supporters name a candidate's experience as most important to their vote.

April 22nd, 2008
06:29 PM ET
7 years ago

Exit polls: McCain would win Clinton and Obama supporters

 McCain talks with residents during a town hall meeting in Youngstown, OH.
McCain talks with residents during a town hall meeting in Youngstown, OH.

(CNN) - John McCain said Tuesday he isn't sure if a prolonged Democratic race is benefiting his candidacy, but the exit polls appear to show it is.

The Arizona senator stands to win supporters of both Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama if their candidate does not win.

Only 50 percent of Clinton voters in Pennsylvania said they would support Obama if he is the nominee. Twenty-six percent said they would back McCain over Obama, and 19 percent said they would not vote at all.

Among Obama’s Pennsylvania voters, 67 percent said they would support Clinton if she is the party's nomine. Seventeen percent said they would back McCain instead, and 12 percent said they would stay home.

Clearly, whoever is the Democratic nominee will have some fences to mend.

April 22nd, 2008
06:15 PM ET
7 years ago

Food and drinks being confiscated from Clinton headquarters

PHILADELPHIA, Pennsylvania (CNN) - Just a little nugget from Clinton headquarters in Philadelphia: The Uniformed Division of the Secret Service is confiscating all food and drink as members of the media file in to cover Hillary Clinton's election night party. Journalists unwilling to part with their liquid are standing next to the magnetometers drinking their coffee, water or soda. A young woman in a tank top and flip-flops was forced to part with a granola bar she was saving for dinner. Clinton’s staff made valiant efforts to try and help reporters out, but to no avail.


Filed under: Hillary Clinton
April 22nd, 2008
06:11 PM ET
3 years ago

Exit polls: Gun owners, church goers choose Clinton

 Parishioners at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Catholic church in Doylestown, PA.
Parishioners at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Catholic church in Doylestown, PA.

(CNN) – Hillary Clinton stressed her gun and church-going credentials following Barack Obama's "bitter" comments, and it appears to have paid off.

According to the exit polls, 58 percent of gun owners voted for Clinton while 42 percent went for Obama.

Among Pennsylvania Democrats who attend church at least once a week, Clinton is beating Obama 59 percent to 41 percent.


Filed under: Bill Schneider • Exit Polls
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