June 8th, 2008
04:58 PM ET
6 years ago

Clinton adviser reflects on failed campaign

Clinton communications director Howard Wolfson said Obama’s campaign can learn from their mistakes.
Clinton communications director Howard Wolfson said Obama’s campaign can learn from their mistakes.

(CNN) – Hillary Clinton’s communications director Howard Wolfson spoke about the New York senator’s failed presidential bid on CNN’s Late Edition - and acknowledged: “There are things that we would have done differently.”

“I think Barack Obama did a pretty good job of learning from whatever mistakes we made,” he told host Wolf Blitzer. “If his campaign wants to study ours and see what we did right and wrong, I'm sure they're going to do that.”

The outspoken adviser also defended the fact that Clinton waited until Saturday to give her concession speech.

“I know we live in the minute-by-minute media culture,” he said. “I think it's a little unrealistic and frankly unfair to expect somebody who's been running for president for 18 months and has done as well as Senator Clinton did – [she] was winning states in the last several months by 30, you know, 40 points to - on the last day of the primary - immediately come out and give a concession speech.”

Despite Wolfson’s admission that the campaign made some slip-ups, he insisted that not highlighting the history-making aspect of being the first female president was not one of them.

“It didn't seem to hurt our ability to get the votes of women who were Senator Clinton's strongest supporters. We overwhelmingly won the woman's vote in this race… African-Americans as a whole tended to vote for Senator Obama in overwhelming numbers, a great credit to him. But white women and Latinas did vote overwhelmingly for Senator Clinton, over 60 percent.”

And what about Wolfson’s immediate plans?

“I'm looking forward to a summer of some relaxation. I'll miss talking to you on a daily basis. But I'm going enjoy talking to my family more,” he said with a smile.

June 8th, 2008
04:54 PM ET
4 years ago

Campaigns reject Bloomberg, ABC offer for televised town hall

Sen. John McCain has called for ten joint appearances before the Democratic Convention in August.
Sen. John McCain has called for ten joint appearances before the Democratic Convention in August.

NEW YORK (CNN) -– If presumptive presidential nominees Barack Obama and John McCain do hold joint town hall meetings before the political conventions, you’ll have plenty of options to watch them.

Both campaigns Sunday quickly rejected an offer by New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and ABC News to hold the first such get-together as a 90-minute, prime time broadcast on ABC.

But the Obama and McCain camps said the idea of one network putting on the event is a non-starter.

Obama spokesman Bill Burton said, “Both campaigns indicate that any additional appearances will be open to all networks for broadcast on TV or Internet like the presidential commission debates, rather than sponsored by a single network or news organization.”

McCain spokesman Tucker Bounds said, "Both campaigns agree the town hall meetings will be open to press but not sponsored or moderated by the press."

The idea of the town hall style meetings was again raised on the campaign trial last week by McCain, who called for ten joint appearances before the Democratic Convention in August. He proposed the first one be held later this month at Federal Hall in New York, saying in a letter to Obama, "What a welcome change it would be were presidential candidates in our time to treat each other and the people they seek to lead with respect and courtesy as they discussed the great issues of the day, without the empty sound bites and media-filtered exchanges that dominate our elections."

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Filed under: Candidate Barack Obama • John McCain
June 8th, 2008
04:34 PM ET
7 months ago

Obama 'fist bump' catching on

Feinstein and Hutchison share a fist bump.
Feinstein and Hutchison share a fist bump.

(CNN) - In a reference to Barack and Michelle Obama's celebratory fist bump on Tuesday, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-California, and Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison, R-Texas, ended their conversation on CNN's Late Edition with their own version of the “hand shake.”


Filed under: Candidate Barack Obama
June 8th, 2008
02:53 PM ET
6 years ago

Feinstein: Obama-Clinton meeting was meant to be a secret

Sen. Dianne Feinstein hosted a private meeting for Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton.
Sen. Dianne Feinstein hosted a private meeting for Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton.

(CNN) – Sen. Dianne Feinstein on Sunday gave new details about the private meeting Sens. Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton held in her home, saying it was “meant to be a secret,” but “it didn’t quite end up like that.”

Clinton and Obama got together privately in Feinstein’s Washington home Thursday. It was their first meeting since Obama became the presumptive Democratic nominee.

Feinstein, D-California, said the session came about after she told Clinton that Obama had said he would meet with her anywhere, anytime.

Clinton told Feinstein she wanted to talk with Obama, but she expressed concern about having to make a press statement about the discussions.

Feinstein said she then offered up her house as a potential meeting place because it would be private. She said Clinton called her around 6 p.m. Thursday, and they scheduled the meeting for 8:30 p.m.

“I thought how wonderful that they had a chance just to be alone, to kind of feel each other out with respect to where they were,” she said Sunday on CNN’s “Late Edition.”

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June 8th, 2008
01:15 PM ET
6 years ago

Clinton's new job: Persuading diehard fans to back Obama

Sen. Hillary Clinton suspended her presidential campaign on Saturday.
Sen. Hillary Clinton suspended her presidential campaign on Saturday.

(CNN) - With Sen. Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign officially over, she is focusing on making sure her supporters back Sen. Barack Obama's bid.

Throughout the primary season, Clinton and Obama expressed confidence the Democrats would unify once a nominee emerged.

As Clinton closed her campaign Saturday, she urged the cheering crowd of thousands to support Obama in his run for the White House, saying she and supporters should "take our energy, our passion and our strength and do all we can to help elect Barack Obama ... I ask all of you to join me in working as hard for Barack Obama as you have for me."

Her endorsement was met with a scattering of boos and thumbs downs from the crowd at the National Building Museum in Washington.

In a CNN poll released Friday, 60 percent of Clinton supporters said they would vote for Obama, but 17 percent said they would vote for McCain and 22 percent, said they would not vote at all if Clinton were not the nominee.

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