October 14th, 2008
09:30 PM ET
6 years ago

Buckley leaves National Review after Obama endorsement

,
Buckley has resigned his post from the National Review.
Buckley has resigned his post from the National Review.

(CNN) - Christopher Buckley, the son of conservative icon William F. Buckley, said Tuesday he's resigned from the conservative National Review days after endorsing Barack Obama's White House bid, among the most powerful symbols yet of the conservative discontent expressed this election cycle.

In an online column, Buckley said he had decided to offer his resignation from the magazine his father founded after hundreds of readers and some National Review colleagues expressed outrage he was backing the Illinois senator.

"While I regret this development, I am not in mourning, for I no longer have any clear idea what, exactly, the modern conservative movement stands for," Buckley wrote.

"Eight years of 'conservative' government has brought us a doubled national debt, ruinous expansion of entitlement programs, bridges to nowhere, poster boy Jack Abramoff and an ill-premised, ill-waged war conducted by politicians of breathtaking arrogance. As a sideshow, it brought us a truly obscene attempt at federal intervention in the Terry Schiavo case," he also wrote.

The resignation comes four days after Buckley formally endorsed Obama on the Web site The Daily Beast, writing the presidential campaign had made John McCain "inauthentic," and Obama appeared to have a "first-class temperament and first-class intellect."

In a statement posted on the publication's Web site Tuesday, National Review editor Rich Lowry noted Buckley was writing for the magazine on a trial basis, and took his offer to resign with the "warmest regards and understanding" sincerely. Lowry also took issue with Buckley's contention the magazine had been flooded with angry mail over Buckley's endorsement, saying it had received a relatively small 100 e-mails expressing disapproval.

"It's an intense election season and emotions are running high," Lowry said.

FULL POST


Filed under: Candidate Barack Obama • Extra • John McCain
October 14th, 2008
06:23 PM ET
6 years ago

Palin on her political future: 'That's a good question'

SCRANTON, Pennsylvania (CNN) – Though her cell phone service repeatedly dropped during her call-in, Sarah Palin made her first appearance on the Rush Limbaugh show on Tuesday, just minutes before taking the stage at a rally in Scranton.

Watch: Palin calls in to Limbaugh's show

In an unusual moment, Limbaugh asked Palin if she had thought about her "political future beyond this campaign." The vice presidential nominee told the conservative talker and his millions of listeners: “That’s a good question.” But she then quickly re-assured the radio host that her focus was on winning the White House with John McCain on November 4.

“No, because I am thinking about November 4, and I am just so absolutely passionate about the job that we have in front of us from now to November 4,” she said.

For the first time, Palin directly addressed the controversy surrounding ACORN’s voter registration operation, and suggested that the media is trying to cover up the story, despite the fact that dozens of national news outlets are investigating the community organization and Obama’s ties to the group.

“Let’s talk quickly about ACORN and the unconscionable situation that we are facing right now with voter fraud, given the ties between Obama and ACORN and the money his campaign has sent them,” Palin told Limbaugh. “Obama has a responsibility to reign in ACORN and prove that he is willing to fight voter fraud. For shame if the mainstream media were to cover this one up.”

October 14th, 2008
06:15 PM ET
6 years ago

Michelle Obama to host Hagel's wife at last debate

The Obama announced that Sen. Hagel's wife, Lilibet, will join Michelle Obama at the final presidential debate. The two men are pictured in this file photo during Obama's summer Mid East trip.
The Obama announced that Sen. Hagel's wife, Lilibet, will join Michelle Obama at the final presidential debate. The two men are pictured in this file photo during Obama's summer Mid East trip.

(CNN) – The Obama campaign announced that Lilibet Hagel, the wife of Republican Sen. Chuck Hagel, will accompany Michelle Obama at Wednesday night’s final presidential debate.

“I am honored to join Michelle Obama at the debate tomorrow night and to strongly support Senator Obama as our country’s next president,” Lilibet Hagel said in a statement released by the Obama campaign.

“Elections have consequences, and this election may be the most important of my lifetime. We have a chance to throw out the disastrous policies of the last eight years and elect a leader who is smart, honest, steady and wise. I am convinced Barack Obama is the right leader to get us to a very bright future,” Mrs. Hagel added.

FULL POST

October 14th, 2008
04:40 PM ET
6 years ago

Biden disappointed McCain will raise Ayers in debate

Sen. Biden said Tuesday that he is disappointed with some of the tactics planned by his longtime friend Sen. John McCain.
Sen. Biden said Tuesday that he is disappointed with some of the tactics planned by his longtime friend Sen. John McCain.

LISBON, Ohio (CNN) – Joe Biden told reporters Tuesday afternoon he is disappointed John McCain is planning to bring up Barack Obama's acquaintance with 1960s radical Bill Ayers at Wednesday night’s debate, but said all Obama has to do to win is repeat his last two performances.

“I think what the debate has shown, the last two debates, is a guy who's confident and steady, and a guy who's not quite sure of where he wants to take the country,” said Biden, waiting for a cheeseburger and shake at Lisbon’s Steel Trolley Diner. “I think all Barack's got to do is repeat the performance he's had the last two times out. I feel good about it, I have total confidence in him.”

Asked how he feels about news that McCain said Ayers will come up, Biden seemed to hope his old friend the Arizona senator would change his mind.

“I'm disappointed, but we'll see. Let's see what, what he does.”

In every campaign speech, Biden makes sure to tell supporters that he and McCain have been friends for decades, and just disagree on policy. He likes to tell a story from the 2000 campaign when McCain and his family were being personally attacked by supporters of then-Texas Gov. George Bush, Biden called McCain and offered to hit the trail to vouch for his character.

So why doesn’t he call McCain now about the character attacks the Arizona senator is launching against Obama?

FULL POST

October 14th, 2008
04:09 PM ET
6 years ago

Obama: We don't need ACORN's help

Sen. Obama talked about ACORN with reporters in Ohio Tuesday.
Sen. Obama talked about ACORN with reporters in Ohio Tuesday.

(CNN) - Sen. Barack Obama responded Tuesday to the McCain campaign's efforts to link him to embattled community organizing group ACORN.

Watch: Obama on the economy, ACORN

"We've got the best voter registration, turnout, and volunteer operation in politics right and we don't need ACORN's help," Obama said Tuesday in Ohio.

The Illinois senator added that ACORN was not advising his campaign, and echoed campaign advisors who have increasingly accused the GOP of trying to suppress voter turnout as Election Day nears.

"What I want to make sure of, though, is that this is not used as an excuse for the kind of voter suppression tactics that we've seen in the past. Let's make sure everybody is voting, everybody is registered, everybody is doing this is a lawful way," he said.

The Democratic nominee's comments came the same day that his campaign held a conference call with reporters about the McCain campaign's recent focus on voter fraud.

Listen: Plouffe, Bauer on voting issues

Obama campaign manager David Plouffe and general counsel Bob Bauer accused Republicans of trying to intimidate voters and sow the seeds of confusion as the historic presidential election approaches.

FULL POST


Filed under: ACORN • Candidate Barack Obama • John McCain • Voter Problems
October 14th, 2008
03:50 PM ET
6 years ago

Obama weighs in on McCain plan

Sen. Obama campaigned in Ohio Tuesday.
Sen. Obama campaigned in Ohio Tuesday.

DAYTON, Ohio (CNN) – Before heading to greet workers during a shift change at a local factory, Barack Obama told reporters the government’s plan to buy shares in the nation’s banks was “a good one.”

The plan “gives taxpayers a better chance of getting their money out,” he said. “It also gives the treasury some more direct mechanisms to monitor and apply some ground rules to participating banks.”

Watch: Obama lays out his plan to help the middle class and the economy

Obama said he was still “concerned” about “cracking down on excessive CEO pay” and wanted to make sure that was part of the Treasury Department’s plan going forward. He also said he wants the discussion about “guarantees to bank loans” to continue as that might help loosen credit for small business owners.

The Democratic nominee said he had yet to fully review the $52 billion economic plan John McCain put forward Tuesday, but said a heavy emphasis on a capital gains tax cut did not seem like a sound idea.

“I will tell you that nobody really has capital gains right now," said Obama. "So if the idea is to cut capital gains taxes - when I don’t know anybody, even the smartest investors who right now are going to be experiencing a lot of capital gains - that probably is not going to be particularly useful in solving the financial crisis.”


Filed under: Candidate Barack Obama • Economy • John McCain
October 14th, 2008
03:49 PM ET
5 years ago

McCain's last stand at final debate?

Sens. Barack Obama and John McCain sparred about domestic policy during their second presidential debate.
Sens. Barack Obama and John McCain sparred about domestic policy during their second presidential debate.

WASHINGTON (CNN) - The third and final presidential debate is shaping up to be a make-or-break appearance for both Sens. John McCain and Barack Obama, one of the last chances to get their message out to undecided voters.

The debate, taking place at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, begins at 9 p.m. ET Wednesday and will be aired live on CNN and CNN.com.

The 90-minute face-off will undoubtedly focus on the economic crisis plaguing the country. And unlike at the other two debates, the candidates will sit at a table facing one another.

CBS News' Bob Schieffer, host of "Face the Nation," will moderate the debate and told The Associated Press on Sunday that he will be seeking more on what each will bring to the presidency.

Full Story

October 14th, 2008
02:11 PM ET
6 years ago

Clinton nixes idea of serving on Supreme Court

Clinton said she is happy being a senator from New York.
Clinton said she is happy being a senator from New York.

(CNN) - It’s a question that arose even before Hillary Clinton abandoned her presidential bid four months ago: What's next for the junior senator from New York?

Definitely not a spot on the Supreme Court, and likely not a bid to be Senate Majority Leader or President of the United States, she told Fox News Tuesday.

Asked directly about rumors she may have her eye on the bench, Clinton said there was “zero” chance of that happening: "I have no interest in doing that," she said, laughing.

Speculation mounted it may be a possibility after Lawrence Tribe, a constitutional law expert at the Harvard Law School who is advising Obama's campaign, said last spring he thought Clinton may be a good fit for the high court.

"I certainly think that Senator Obama's inclination to look for people of broad experience, people whose deepest values and whose empathy with others makes them wise human beings as well as expert lawyers, would mean he wouldn't rule out people such as Senator Clinton just because they don't have judicial experience," he told the National Journal.

Others in the chattering class have said a run for Senate Majority Leader, replacing Sen. Harry Reid, is much more likely, given Clinton's success in the chamber and the respect she has forged there. Many also speculate Clinton still harbors presidential ambitions, and could run in four or eight years depending on if Barack Obama is elected.

Watch: Clinton back on the trail

But speaking to Fox Tuesday, Clinton said the chances she pursues either of those options are "probably zero."

"There's an old saying: Bloom where you're planted. And I've always loved that," she said. "I love being in the Senate. I ran for president because I thought we had to make drastic changes given what I viewed as the damage that the Bush administration had done here at home and abroad. Now I'm going to work very hard with President Obama to repair that damage."

October 14th, 2008
02:03 PM ET
6 years ago

ON THE TRAIL: Palin in Scranton

Watch the event on CNN.com/live.
Watch the event on CNN.com/live.

(CNN) - Sarah Palin held a campaign rally in Scranton, Pennsylvania earlier Tuesday, during which she got tough on Barack Obama over taxes.

“America just can’t afford another big spender in the White House, she said.


Filed under: Happening Now • Sarah Palin
October 14th, 2008
01:54 PM ET
6 years ago

Republicans consider loan to help Senate incumbents

 Analysts say the November election could give Democrats a filibuster-proof majority.
Analysts say the November election could give Democrats a filibuster-proof majority.

(CNN) - Amid a string of polls that suggest Democrats could be in striking distance of reaching a filibuster-proof majority, the Republican National Committee is considering taking out a loan to help endangered senators in key battleground states, a GOP strategist told CNN Tuesday.

The news comes a week after the RNC announced it had raised $66 million in September, its best fundraising month ever. But in an effort to keep pace with Barack Obama's cash advantage over John McCain, those funds are going entirely toward the presidential race.

Related: Can Dems reach 60?

Meanwhile the National Republican Senatorial Committee has been largely outspent by its Democratic counterpart this cycle and the possibility of Democrats getting to the magic number of 60 seats in the Senate has become likely in the wake of the economic crisis.

It's unclear what the size of the loan might be, but Politico reported Monday the amount could be as high as $5 million.


Filed under: Senate
« older posts