January 13th, 2009
12:19 PM ET
6 years ago

I.G. report says former civil rights chief broke the law

Bradley Schlozman testified before Congress in 2007.
Bradley Schlozman testified before Congress in 2007.

WASHINGTON (CNN) – A long-awaited Justice Department report on the troubled Civil Rights Division says a politically-motivated former chief of the Division violated a federal hiring law and made false statements to Congress about his controversial hiring practices.

Bradley Schlozman, however, will not be prosecuted. The report says the U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Columbia decided last week not to prosecute Schlozman for the violations found by investigators for the Inspector General.

The 65-page report by Inspector General Glenn Fine describes Schlozman as a staunch conservative who tried to punish liberal employees within the Civil Rights Division.

"Our investigation concluded that Schlozman... inappropriately considered political and ideological affiliations in hiring career attorneys and in other personnel actions affecting career attorneys in the Division," the report said. "We concluded that in doing so Schlozman violated federal law (The Civil Service Reform Act) and Department policy, both of which prohibit discrimination in federal employment based on political or ideological affiliations, and committed misconduct."

The Inspector General also faulted Schlozman for his congressional testimony.

"Our report concluded that Schlozman made false statements about whether he had considered political and ideological affiliations when he testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee on June 5, 2007 and in his written responses to supplemental questions from the Committee."

The report is the fourth and final one to be issued by the Inspector General stemming from the controversial firing of U.S. Attorneys by top Justice Department officials, and allegations of extensive improper hiring practices by conservative Republican officials who used political criteria in their decision making.


Filed under: Justice Department
soundoff (141 Responses)
  1. Larry

    After reading the story,Schlozman was trying to hire people with work ethics,and find honest people-It's not surprising that he had to discriminate based on political or ideological affiliations,in order to get good people.

    January 13, 2009 01:39 pm at 1:39 pm |
  2. Ed

    First, Scooter Libby's sentence commutaion, and now this. Once again we see Bush appointees being given immunity for illegal acts. Less politically connected federal law violators must face the consequences of their actions, and federal prison time for non-violent offenses, while the politically connected do not. False statements to Congress is a federal CRIME. Shame on the U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Columbia.

    January 13, 2009 01:43 pm at 1:43 pm |
  3. obama-mama

    The problem is these people just get away with a slap on the wrist. If they're punished and fine I'm sure they would think about repeating their same mistakes. America a little too lax on folks that could use a good a__ whoopin.

    January 13, 2009 01:44 pm at 1:44 pm |
  4. believe

    if he broke the law, put him out.

    January 13, 2009 01:47 pm at 1:47 pm |
  5. Aldo in Indiana

    So, apparently perjury doesn't matter anymore?

    January 13, 2009 01:47 pm at 1:47 pm |
  6. Annie

    Truly reprehensible. The Bushies can't get out of D.C. soon enough for me.

    January 13, 2009 01:49 pm at 1:49 pm |
  7. sick n tired

    Why no prosecution? What makes him above the law? Someone care to explain that to me? The U.S. Attorney General should step down if he is too lazy or lacks the testicular fortitude TO DO HIS JOB! If an average American pulled something like this they would be pros ecuted to fullest extent of the law! Whats up with that??????

    January 13, 2009 01:51 pm at 1:51 pm |
  8. sick n tired

    Why no prosecution? What makes him above the law? Someone care to explain that to me? The U.S. Attorney General should step down if he is too lazy or lacks the testicular fortitude TO DO HIS JOB! If an average American pulled something like this they would be prosecuted to fullest extent of the law! Whats up with that??????

    January 13, 2009 01:52 pm at 1:52 pm |
  9. Ron Ft. Myers

    FreeNLove, let's not forget the great role models the Clintons were during their tenure.

    January 13, 2009 01:53 pm at 1:53 pm |
  10. Casey

    Does this mean this guy's going to get away scot-free?

    January 13, 2009 01:55 pm at 1:55 pm |
  11. Ghost

    Take about your 2 legal systems. Now, correct me if I'm worng, but if he lied in his congressional testimony, isn't that perjury? And if we can send Lil Kim up for a year, then this guy can go to. And take Roger Clemens with you.

    January 13, 2009 01:55 pm at 1:55 pm |
  12. Jasper

    OK, then, why not prosecute him? Where's the deterrence factor going forward if no-one is ever prosecuted?

    Just another crime committed by the Bush administration that goes unpunished!

    January 13, 2009 02:00 pm at 2:00 pm |
  13. richard

    All liberal are punished anyway, they remain poor by keep voting Democrat. No one has ever been taxed into wealth. Besides we all saw how racist they are by the way they treated Roland Burris. Bradley Schlozman, however, will not be prosecuted because he did nothing wrong.

    January 13, 2009 02:01 pm at 2:01 pm |
  14. Harry8

    Making false statements under oath is called perjury. I seem to recall an inpeachment based on a perjury charge just a few years ago. Funny, republicans don't seem to care about The Rule of Law we heard so often back in the day!

    January 13, 2009 02:01 pm at 2:01 pm |
  15. Alan

    Can someone explain to me why this guy is NOT being prosecuted. He broke the LAW.
    Never mind I forgot that the people investigating him are also Bush appointees.

    January 13, 2009 02:02 pm at 2:02 pm |
  16. J

    If he broke the law, why is there no prosecution? Why selective prosecutions? There is no deterrent for future misconduct.

    January 13, 2009 02:03 pm at 2:03 pm |
  17. Nikes or Pumps, Which to Throw?

    Only seven days left until the stench leaves Washington.

    January 13, 2009 02:04 pm at 2:04 pm |
  18. Ed

    If no one is prosecuted for misdeeds, then you can expect future administrations to behave the same way. Maybe Obama, maybe the next one or the next one after.

    These were motivated violations, not technical mistakes. You HAVE to prosecute some of these to make a statement.

    January 13, 2009 02:04 pm at 2:04 pm |
  19. Ron , West Coast

    When the Obama justice department takes over, we`ll see about whether or not this Bush cronie will be prosecuted ........

    January 13, 2009 02:04 pm at 2:04 pm |
  20. Jackie in Dallas

    He should be prosecuted. He certainly would not have held back if he had a case like this!

    January 13, 2009 02:07 pm at 2:07 pm |
  21. Jackie in Dallas

    ...and does anyone else find it ironic that the Chief of the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice was found guilty of using political affliation for a reason to push people out of their positions??

    January 13, 2009 02:09 pm at 2:09 pm |
  22. Allen

    So is the whole Bush administration going to get away with all the crimes that they committed? Surely someone has to be held responsible!!!

    January 13, 2009 02:10 pm at 2:10 pm |
  23. cat

    Another one bites the dust....Why America do we keep letting these losers in to the powerful postions.

    January 13, 2009 02:14 pm at 2:14 pm |
  24. Redbug

    another REPUB IDIOT. do they realize how stupid they come across?
    I don't think they will ever learn.

    January 13, 2009 02:27 pm at 2:27 pm |
  25. MIKE HENLEY

    We've all been watching officials of the Bush Admin. dong this kind of thing for 8 years. Not prosecuting them for breaking the law sets a dangerous precedent. Does this mean that Democrats(of which I am one) can get away with the same thing without fear of reprisal? I'm afraid it might. It's a mistake to lower the bar to the level of criminality.

    January 13, 2009 02:28 pm at 2:28 pm |
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