May 28th, 2009
11:59 PM ET
5 years ago

Bush: 'The information we got saved lives'

In a Michigan speech, Bush spoke out about his administration's efforts to combat terrorism.
In a Michigan speech, Bush spoke out about his administration's efforts to combat terrorism.

BENTON HARBOR, Michigan (CNN) – Former President George W. Bush on Thursday repeated Dick Cheney's assertion that their enhanced interrogation program was legal and garnered valuable information that prevented future terrorist attacks.

In his largest domestic speech since leaving the White House in January, Bush told an audience in southwestern Michigan that after the September 11 attacks, "I vowed to take whatever steps that were necessary to protect you."

Although he did not specifically allude to the high-profile debate over President Obama's decision to halt the use harsh interrogation techniques, and without referencing Cheney by name, Bush spoke in broad strokes about how he proceeded after the capture of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed in March 2003.

"The first thing you do is ask, what's legal?" he said. "What do the lawyers say is possible? I made the decision, within the law, to get information so I can say to myself, 'I've done what it takes to do my duty to protect the American people.' I can tell you that the information we got saved lives."

But Bush avoided the sharp tone favored by his former vice president in recent weeks, and went out of his way to stress that he does not want to disparage the new president.

"Nothing I am saying is meant to criticize my successor," Bush said. "There are plenty of people who have weighed in. Trust me, having seen it firsthand. I didn't like it when a former president criticized me, so therefore I am not going to criticize my successor. I wish him all the best."

The former president was speaking to nearly 2,500 members the Economic Club of Southwestern Michigan. The format of the speech was changed at the last minute when Bush decided to answer questions directly from the audience members, instead of responding to pre-submitted questions provided to a moderator.

Bush repeated his disclaimer about not passing judgment Obama later in the speech when asked about North Korea's test of a nuclear weapon. Before answering, the 43rd president said that he is "in no way trying to shape my successor's decisions or criticize them."

"I know there are news people here, and they love conflict," he said.

On the topic of how to respond to North Korea, Bush said diplomacy is impossible without leverage.

"A lot of times people want to give out the carrots," he said. "My attitude is, you give out the carrots when the behavior changes."

After his opening remarks, Bush engaged in a nearly hour-long back-and-forth with audience members that touched on nearly all aspects of his presidency, from the September 11 attacks to his ban on embryonic stem cell research to his consultations with advisers as the economic crisis hit last year.

He strongly defended his Troubled Asset Relief Program as crucial to preventing capital markets from freezing up, which he said would have led to another Great Depression. He noted that he remains "a free market guy."

Bush was asked what he thinks about conservative pundits who claim the Obama administration's fiscal policies are opening the door to socialism.

"I've heard talk about that," he said. "I think the verdict is out. I think people are waiting to see what all this means."

The former president earned a noisy standing ovation when asked what he wants his legacy to be.

"Well, I hope it is this: The man showed up with a set of principles, and he was unwilling to compromise his soul for the sake of popularity," he said.

Bush also revealed the topic of the first chapter in his forthcoming book, which he said will be about "the stories of my administration as I saw them." That first chapter, he said, will be answer the question: "Why did I run for president?"

An aide to the former president did not disclose how much he was paid for the speaking appearance, which was booked through the Washington Speakers Bureau. After the event, Bush flew to Toronto, where he will appear tomorrow at a forum with his White House predecessor, Bill Clinton.


Filed under: Dick Cheney • Popular Posts • President Bush • President Obama
soundoff (337 Responses)
  1. Sam

    "The man showed up with a set of principles, and he was unwilling to sacrifice his soul for the sake of popularity." Noble men uphold their principles at all cost but not all principles are noble.

    May 29, 2009 01:16 am at 1:16 am |
  2. Palin2012

    Bush is an honest man who will be remembered well by history!

    May 29, 2009 01:18 am at 1:18 am |
  3. Wanderer

    Former president Bush said: ' I can tell you that the information we got saved lives."
    The terrorists killed 3000 Americans on 9/11. Bush saved lives with the death of 4000 American soldiers and hundreds of thousands of innocent people and the terrorists are still growing and everywhere. I don’t think it was a good saving.

    May 29, 2009 01:19 am at 1:19 am |
  4. Eileen

    I want to know how much he was paid - not just for this performance, but for his Presidency.

    May 29, 2009 01:19 am at 1:19 am |
  5. ML

    I am always amazed by our "Christian" past-president. His first question is "What is legal?" A true Christian would ask "What is moral?". The end justifies the means argument that he and Cheney are proffering leads to the same line of reasoning that has people fly airplanes into buildings, although I am by no means equating the two.

    May 29, 2009 01:20 am at 1:20 am |
  6. tom

    George W Bush is a great man.

    May 29, 2009 01:21 am at 1:21 am |
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