September 12th, 2009
04:58 PM ET
5 years ago

McDonnell drops F-bomb in live interview

Republican Bob McDonnell dropped the F-bomb during a radio interview.
Republican Bob McDonnell dropped the F-bomb during a radio interview.

WASHINGTON (CNN) – Bob McDonnell, the normally-disciplined Republican candidate for governor in Virginia, mistakenly blurted out the F-bomb during a live radio interview on Friday.

Appearing on Washington-area radio station WTOP, McDonnell was sparring with host Mark Plotkin on the topic of transportation funding.

Plotkin asked if McDonnell would consider an increase in the state gasoline tax to help fund the transportation budget. McDonnell said no, and uttered the expletive during his response.

"So no tax will be raised during your four-year term?," Plotkin asked.

McDonnell answered: "I'm going to find other ways to be able to fund transportation. I've outlined twleve f-ing funding mechanisms that are creative, that are entrepreneurial."

The remark was first flagged by the Virginia Democratic blog NotLarrySabato.

McDonnell is running against Democrat Creigh Deeds in the governor's race, one of two marquee political battles in 2009 along with the New Jersey governor's race.

UPDATE: McDonnell communications director Tucker Martin said McDonnell's remark was nothing more than a verbal flub.

"At one point Bob was speaking quickly, and in trying to say 'funding mechanism,' he stumbled and accidentally said another word," Martin said. "It was unintentional, and anyone who spends any time around Bob knows he does not use such language. It was an accident. It is that simple."

Martin called it "disappointing" that the Deeds campaign is spending "so much time and energy aggressively pushing this absolutely trivial matter to every blog and media outlet they can think of."


Filed under: Bob McDonnell • Popular Posts
September 12th, 2009
04:56 PM ET
5 years ago

Source: Joe Wilson racking up the dollars after 'you lie' comment

Wilson directly asked in a Web video for campaign cash to fend off attacks from political opponents and said he's standing by his opposition to Democratic efforts at health care reform.
Wilson directly asked in a Web video for campaign cash to fend off attacks from political opponents and said he's standing by his opposition to Democratic efforts at health care reform.

WASHINGTON (CNN) – U.S. Rep. Joe Wilson - the South Carolina Republican who heckled President Obama during his speech to a joint session of Congress - has raised more than $1 million, a campaign aide confirmed to CNN Saturday.

News of that cash haul comes after Wilson directly asked in a Web video for campaign cash to fend off attacks from political opponents and said he's standing by his opposition to Democratic efforts at health care reform.

Wilson has come under fire for shouting "you lie" to Obama during the Wednesday night address to Congress on health care reform. The lawmaker soon apologized for his behavior, viewed by Republicans and Democrats as an ill-mannered breach of political decorum.

The remark energized Wilson's opponents and supporters, who have been opening their wallets and sending donations to Wilson and Rob Miller, his Democratic opponent in next year's congressional race.

Miller - who has reported raking in more than $1 million as a result of the outburst - ran against Wilson last year, losing by 8 percentage points. It was Wilson's smallest margin of victory in his five elections to Congress.

FULL POST


Filed under: Joe Wilson • Rob Miller
September 12th, 2009
02:58 PM ET
5 years ago

Brown vies for Kennedy's seat

Massachusetts Republican state Sen. Scott Brown will run for Ted Kennedy's vacant Senate seat.
Massachusetts Republican state Sen. Scott Brown will run for Ted Kennedy's vacant Senate seat.

WASHINGTON (CNN)–On his 50th birthday, Massachusetts Republican state Sen. Scott Brown announced his intentions to run for the late Sen. Ted Kennedy's vacant Senate seat.

Characterizing himself as a Washington outsider, Brown spoke directly to the people of Massachusetts.

"Already, my opponents have started pandering to the special interests, promising to support their pet projects," Brown said. "That's not the way I operate. Because I don't owe anybody anything, I'm free to tell the truth and fight for what's right for all of the people of Massachusetts, no matter their political party."

Read Browns full remarks here.

Brown said he has a history of bipartisanship as a three-term state senator and former three-term state representative, and spelled out his "core" beliefs.

"I believe that government is getting too big and that the federal stimulus bill made government bigger instead of creating jobs as was supposed to happen," Brown said.

The veteran legislator made his announcement after former Bush administration Chief of Staff Andy Card, dropped out of the race late Friday and encouraged Brown to run for the seat instead.

Another conservative name that's been mentioned is that of former Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling.

On the Democratic side, Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley has already announced her plans to run for the seat.

Kennedy, 77, died on August 25 after a year-long battle with brain cancer. He had served in the Senate for nearly 50 years - most recently winning reelection in 2006.


Filed under: Ted Kennedy
September 12th, 2009
01:30 PM ET
September 12th, 2009
12:31 PM ET
5 years ago

DNC paints Pawlenty as liar

The DNC is out with a new ad painting Gov. Pawlenty as a 'liar.'
The DNC is out with a new ad painting Gov. Pawlenty as a 'liar.'

WASHINGTON (CNN)– Ahead of President Obama's visit to Minneapolis Saturday, the Democratic National Committee is out with a new attack ad painting Minnesota Governor Tim Pawlenty as a politician attempting to appeal to the "extremists" in the Republican party.

"Tim Pawlenty is spreading lies about health reform," the nearly two-minute web ad charges.

The ad titled "Tim Pawlenty: In the extreme," is a compilation of interviews the Minnesota governor has given over the past few months in which he calls the President's health plan a "joke" and claims the bill "might affect end of life decisions."

Highlighting Pawlenty's recent campaign efforts for Virginia Republican gubernatorial candidate Bob McDonnell, the ad accuses him of "campaigning for extremists."

Pawlenty, who was on Sen. John McCain's short list of vice presidential candidates, has also been rumored to be one of the leading Republican candidates running for president in 2012.

Friday, the Republican party of Minnesota released an ad calling President Obama's health care plan "risky," and urging him to "slow down and do health care reform the right way."

The President speaks in Minnesota Saturday at a health care reform rally that begins at 1230p CT/130p ET.

UPDATE: RNC Spokesman LeRoy Coleman released the following statement in response to the DNC ad:

“Once again, the Democrats are desperately trying to shift attention away from their extraordinarily unpopular health care plan – especially on a day when the President is bringing his traveling road show to Minnesota in an attempt to sell his floundering government-run health care proposal. Minnesotans, however, aren’t fooled by the rhetoric. The President’s government-run health care plan would increase costs, increase taxes, increase the deficit and reduce health care choice and quality.”

Filed under: President Obama • Tim Pawlenty
September 12th, 2009
12:29 PM ET
5 years ago

Tea Party Express rallies against 'big government'

ALT TEXT

Tens of thousands marched to the U.S. Capitol on Saturday to protest health care reform. (Photo Credit: Getty Images)
WASHINGTON (CNN) – On the final stop of the Tea Party Express, thousands marched to the U.S. Capitol on Saturday to protest health care reform, higher taxes and what they see as out-of-control government spending.

The conservative advocacy group began their trip in Sacramento, California, and made its way across the country, hosting rallies in about 30 cities. Washington is the final destination. Members gathered on the west side of the Capitol on Saturday.

At each stop, the tour highlights members of Congress "who have voted for higher spending, higher taxes, and government intervention in the lives of American families and businesses," according to The Tea Party Express Web site.

One woman at the rally summed up her feelings about issues this way: "It's too much too fast."

A major theme of the rally was the push for less government.

"The government should be doing things that are authorized by the constitution; they should be doing things that the people want, not things that they just decide are nifty. We can't afford these things any more.

Full story


Filed under: Tea Party Express
September 12th, 2009
12:01 PM ET
5 years ago

Rep. Kline to Obama: 'start from scratch' on health care

President Obama spoke to a joint session of Congress on Wednesday.
President Obama spoke to a joint session of Congress on Wednesday.

WASHINGTON (CNN)—Congressman John Kline urged President Obama to take the proposed health care bill off the table Saturday and “start from scratch,” if he wants a bill passed anytime soon.

“There are things we can agree on, and things we can’t,” Rep. Kline said in a conference call with reporters, explaining Republicans are willing to sit down and compromise if the President will come to the table without the proposed bill HR3200.

Kline called the presidents plan a “pilot plan,” one which lacks real details.

President Obama heads to Kline’s home state Saturday for a rally in support of health care.

“The rally will surely be confusing because the president is on a sales pitch,” the Minnesota representative said.

In response to Vice President Biden’s remarks earlier this week that there will be a bill by Thanksgiving, Kline said it is impossible to determine a timeframe.

“We don’t know now what we are dealing with,” Kline said. “If it’s HR3200 the way it came through committee, I don’t think it can pass,” he said, stressing if Republicans and Democrats can start with a clean slate a plan “could move very quickly.”


Filed under: Health care • President Obama
September 12th, 2009
11:38 AM ET
September 12th, 2009
10:02 AM ET
5 years ago

Cornyn touts GOP health plans

Sen. Cornyn touted the Republican health plans Saturday.
Sen. Cornyn touted the Republican health plans Saturday.

WASHINGTON (CNN)– In the weekly Republican radio address, Senator John Cornyn touted a Republican health care plan "that will lower cost and expand access to care," while criticizing the president's plan, which he claims would "bust the budget."

"The Republicans want to save Medicare and Medicaid from bankruptcy by offering more choices to beneficiaries and making providers compete for their business," Sen. Cornyn said.

The Texas Senator said a Republican plan would work to lower coverage costs on a state level by increasing competition in the private insurance industry.

"So, instead of a top down plan that will bust the budget, President Obama should work with Republicans on a bottom up solution that the American people can support," Cornyn said.

In response to Cornyn's address the DNC released the following statement:

"In this week's GOP radio address, Texas Republican Senator John Cornyn reiterates the same debunked GOP talking points we've heard for weeks on end without offering a single GOP proposal to fix this country's broken health insurance system – not one. The truth is, the President's health insurance reforms will curb out-of-control costs, increase choice and competition, and strengthen our health insurance system so that Americans can keep the coverage they already have."

Filed under: Health care • President Obama
September 12th, 2009
10:01 AM ET
« older posts