November 4th, 2009
07:11 PM ET
3 years ago

Update: Bush, Clinton cancel joint event

A joint event featuring both former president has been cancelled.
A joint event featuring both former president has been cancelled.

Washington (CNN) - A representative for former President Bill Clinton is confirming a report that a scheduled event featuring Clinton and former President George W. Bush has been cancelled by the two ex-presidents.

Radio City Music Hall had announced that the two former presidents were set to share the legendary venue's stage on February 25.

But the New York Post reported on Wednesday afternoon that Bush and Clinton have cancelled the event because the promoter had "overhyped" the joint appearance.

In an e-mail to CNN, Clinton spokesman Matt McKenna confirmed the New York Post's report.

Earlier, McKenna had stressed that the New York event would not be a heated debate.

"Just a moderated conversation...no fireworks," he said.

Earlier: Bush, Clinton to appear at Radio City Music Hall


–CNN's Alexander Mooney and Kay Jones contributed to this report.


Filed under: Bill Clinton • Extra • George W. Bush • Popular Posts
November 4th, 2009
06:32 PM ET
November 4th, 2009
06:31 PM ET
4 years ago

Palin: NY-23 race 'just postponed until 2010'

Sarah Palin said the race in NY-23 is 'just postponed until 2010.'
Sarah Palin said the race in NY-23 is 'just postponed until 2010.'

(CNN) – Democrat Bill Owens may have won last night's special election in New York's 23rd congressional district - but Sarah Palin said Wednesday that race "is not over."

Writing on Facebook early Wednesday morning, the former Alaska governor praised Conservative Party candidate Doug Hoffman and "all the other under-dog candidates who have the courage to put themselves out there and run against the odds."

"The race for New York's 23rd District is not over, just postponed until 2010," Palin wrote. "The issues of this election have always centered on the economy – on the need for fiscal restraint, smaller government, and policies that encourage jobs. In 2010, these issues will be even more crucial to the electorate."

Owens – the first Democrat to win this district since the 19th century – is up for re-election in 2010.

Palin, along with prominent conservatives Tim Pawlenty, Fred Thompson and Dick Armey, backed Hoffman last month over then-Republican nominee, Dede Scozzafava, who dropped out the weekend before Election Day. The race garnered national attention over the Republican Party split between the Scozzafava and the more conservative Hoffman.


Filed under: Bill Owens • Doug Hoffman • NY-23 • Popular Posts • Sarah Palin
November 4th, 2009
06:29 PM ET
4 years ago

Senate throws a lifeline to the jobless

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) - After weeks of partisan debate, the Senate voted on Wednesday to lengthen unemployment benefits by up to 20 weeks and to extend the $8,000 homebuyer tax credit.

The closely watched legislation would extend jobless benefits in all states by 14 weeks. Those that live in states with unemployment greater than 8.5% would receive an additional six weeks. The proposal would be funded by extending a longstanding federal unemployment tax on employers through June 30, 2011.

The measure would apply to those whose benefits will run out by Dec. 31, which is nearly two million people, according to Senate estimates. Those whose checks have already stopped would be able to reapply for another round.

The vote was 98 to 0.

The measure now moves to the House, which passed its own benefits extension in September, giving an additional 13 weeks in high-unemployment states. The two bills must now be reconciled, though the House is expected to support the Senate's version.

Full story on CNNMoney.com


Filed under: Economy • Senate
November 4th, 2009
05:37 PM ET
4 years ago

Obama calls McDonnell to offer congratulations

Virginia Gov.-elect Bob McDonnell, a Republican, told reporters Wednesday that President Obama called to wish him congratulations after his win Tuesday.
Virginia Gov.-elect Bob McDonnell, a Republican, told reporters Wednesday that President Obama called to wish him congratulations after his win Tuesday.

RICHMOND, Virginia (CNN) - Virginia's Republican Gov.-elect Bob McDonnell took a congratulatory phone call from President Obama the morning after his landslide victory over Democrat Creigh Deeds, McDonnell told reporters Wednesday.

The call came shortly after 11 a.m. this morning, he said.

"He was exceptionally gracious and kind," McDonnell noted. "We had a couple of laughs. He said that be sure the first thing you do is thank your wife."

"He also told me he thought we ran a very good campaign that it was a good contest, and now that the campaign was over he hoped we would work closely together to govern, especially with Virginia being a neighboring state to the District of Columbia," he said.

The White House said Wednesday that the president called the winners of all of last night's races, including Republican Gov.-elect Chris Christie of New Jersey, Democrat Bill Owens of New York's 23rd congressional district, and independent New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.
FULL POST


Filed under: Bob McDonnell • President Obama
November 4th, 2009
05:25 PM ET
November 4th, 2009
05:13 PM ET
4 years ago

GOP continues boycott of committee debate on climate bill

Republicans on the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, chaired by Sen. Boxer, are boycotting hearings on a climate change bill.
Republicans on the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, chaired by Sen. Boxer, are boycotting hearings on a climate change bill.

Washington (CNN) - A Republican boycott of Senate committee debate on a major climate change bill continued for a second day Wednesday, frustrating majority Democrats who have threatened to move ahead despite the lack of a GOP presence.

Only one of the seven Republicans on the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee showed up Wednesday when the panel started its meeting on the bill authored by Democratic Sens. Barbara Boxer of California and John Kerry of Massachusetts.

Sen. James Inhofe of Oklahoma, the panel's ranking Republican and an outspoken opponent of climate change legislation, left the meeting after delivering a brief statement. Republicans also stayed away from Tuesday's opening session after one GOP senator - George Voinovich of Ohio - made an opening statement.

Committee rules require at least two minority party members to be present to reach a working quorum. However, an exception could allow the committee to proceed on the bill without any Republicans, according to committee staff members.

Boxer, who chairs the committee, said Tuesday she hoped the Republicans would join the debate, but that the panel eventually would act on the bill without them as permitted under Senate rules.
FULL POST


Filed under: Energy • Senate
November 4th, 2009
04:11 PM ET
4 years ago

CNN Exit Polls – November 3, 2009 – New Jersey and Virginia

TOPICS: Exit polls in New Jersey and Virginia gubernatorial elections

Full results for New Jersey (pdf)

Full results for Virginia (pdf)


Filed under: CNN Poll Archive • Exit Polls • Extra
November 4th, 2009
03:56 PM ET
4 years ago

Axelrod calls NY-23 'only national race of consequence'

David Axelrod said the gubernatorial races in New Jersey and Virginia were 'impacted by state issues.'
David Axelrod said the gubernatorial races in New Jersey and Virginia were 'impacted by state issues.'

(CNN) – Top White House aide David Axelrod brushed off Democratic electoral losses in Virginia and New Jersey Wednesday, calling the congressional race in New York's 23rd district the "only national race of consequence."

Axelrod told CNN's Wolf Blitzer that the gubernatorial races in Virginia and New Jersey were "impacted by state issues" and that they were not national races. He said the results of those races should not intimidate moderate Democrats, who he said should focus instead on the election in upstate New York, where a Democrat won the seat for the first time in over 100 years.

"That's the race that most members of Congress are going to look at with interest, and that's the race they should," Axelrod said. "Because the message was, if you embrace the president's agenda… then you will do well and you'll energize voters and you'll get the kind of turnout you need to win your race."

Many Republicans have called the race in NY-23 a unique situation - since the local GOP appointed the nominee instead of conducting a primary, which they say Hoffman would have won - Axelrod called the chaotic contest evidence of an intra-party split.

"What you saw there was I think the future, or the near-term future of the Republican Party, civil war in which the right wing ran the moderates out of the party," Axelrod said. "And they ran right to the Democratic candidate. And I think that has some harbingers for what's to come."

Tune into The Situation Room beginning at 4 pm ET for the rest of Wolf Blitzer's interview with Axelrod.


Filed under: David Axelrod • NY-23
November 4th, 2009
03:53 PM ET
4 years ago

The West is tough terrain for Democrats

Denver, Colorado (CNN) – The western United States, with its independent streak and growing population, is the terrain both political parties are hoping to mine for electoral gains in the coming years.

With Denver hosting the 2008 Democratic Convention and a more concentrated effort in the region, the Obama campaign was able to capture Colorado, New Mexico and Nevada in last year's presidential election. Some Democrats hoped those results foretold a transformation, but a year later, political experts are saying not so fast.

Related video: Colorado senator discusses challenges

The West gives President Obama his lowest approval ratings, and the Democratic Party has a 45 percent approval rating in the area - the only region in the country in which it gets under 50 percent, according to an October 16-18 CNN/Opinion Research Corporation poll.

Full Story


Filed under: Democrats
« older posts