December 19th, 2009
04:02 PM ET
11 months ago

Palin continues to blast climate change believers

Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin continued to blast believers in climate change Friday.
Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin continued to blast believers in climate change Friday.

(CNN)– In a late night posting on her Twitter feed, Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin continued to blast climate change believers Friday, calling the talks in Copenhagen, Denmark a representation of man's "arrogance," for believing people have an impact on nature.

"Arrogant&Naive2say man overpwers nature," Palin tweeted.

"Earth saw clmate chnge4 ions;will cont 2 c chnges.R duty2responsbly devlop resorces4humankind/not pollute&destroy;but cant alter naturl chng," the former Republican vice presidential nominee wrote.

Palin's latest comments come after weeks of tangling over climate change with California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, former vice president Al Gore, and President Obama.

In an op-ed in the Washington Post, Palin urged the president to boycott the climate talks, calling his presence at the conference a "political move."

"The last thing America needs is misguided legislation that will raise taxes and cost jobs – particularly when the push for such legislation rests on agenda-driven science," Palin wrote. "Without trustworthy science and with so much at stake, Americans should be wary about what comes out of this politicized conference. The president should boycott Copenhagen."

When Schwarzenegger questioned Palin's stance on climate change, Palin quickly hit back saying the actor-turned-governor was acting "greener than thou."

And when former vice president Al Gore dubbed her a climate change "denier," Palin hit back at him too, accusing him of promoting "doomsday scenarios."

"Climate change is like gravity – a naturally occurring phenomenon that existed long before, and will exist long after, any governmental attempts to affect it," Palin wrote on her Facebook page.

During the vice presidential debate last year, Palin said she was for capping carbon emissions but did not elaborate on how she would do that.


Filed under: Energy • Popular Posts • Sarah Palin
December 19th, 2009
03:04 PM ET
December 19th, 2009
03:03 PM ET
11 months ago

Democrats could vote by Christmas on health-care bill

Washington (CNN) - U.S. Sen. Ben Nelson of Nebraska threw his support Saturday behind the Democrats' health care reform bill, giving the party the crucial backing it needed to avoid a Republican filibuster that would prevent a Senate vote.

The first of a series of votes is set for Monday at 1 a.m. on a so-called manager's amendment, consisting of amendments crafted in the last one and a half weeks by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada.

At the request of Republicans, the entire amendments package - 383 pages - was being read Saturday, for hours, on the Senate floor.

The Senate could vote on the entire bill - a top priority of President Barack Obama - before Christmas.

Sen. Mitch McConnell, the Senate Republican leader, said the latest version of the Senate health care bill "is a legislative train wreck of historic proportions."

"If they were proud of this bill they wouldn't be doing it this way," McConnell said. "They wouldn't be jamming it through in the middle of the night on the last weekend before Christmas."

McConnell said the legislation "will have a profound impact on our nation. This is not renaming a post office. Make no mistake, this bill will reshape our nation and our lives."

Reid and Sen. Charles Schumer of New York spent most of Friday trying to answer concerns by Nelson, who had been the lone Democratic holdout because of his objections to public funding for abortions. According to Schumer, the three men finally shook hands on a deal at 11 p.m.

Nelson's backing gave the Democrats the crucial 60 votes needed to move the bundle of recent amendments, which involved a spate of compromises, to the Senate floor.

"Change is never easy, but change is what's necessary in America today. That's why I intend to vote for cloture and for health care reform," the Nebraska Democrat told reporters.

FULL POST


Filed under: Health care • President Obama
December 19th, 2009
01:50 PM ET
11 months ago

President Obama: Health bill will significantly reduce deficit


Washington (CNN) – President Barack Obama said the health care reform bill now in the Senate would be the largest deficit-reduction measure in a decade.

According to the Congressional Budget Office, it will offer a decrease of $132 billion over the first decade, and more than $1 trillion in the 10 years after that.


Filed under: Health care • President Obama
December 19th, 2009
01:31 PM ET
11 months ago

Winter storm blankets Washington D.C.

ALT TEXT

Washington D.C. got hit with inches of snow Saturday. Photo Credit: CNN


Filed under: Washington D.C.
December 19th, 2009
12:19 PM ET
11 months ago

McConnell: Health care bill a 'legislative train wreck'


Washington (CNN) – Sen. Mitch McConnell, the Senate Republican leader, said the latest version of the Senate health care bill "is a legislative train wreck of historic proportions."

"If they were proud of this bill they wouldn't be doing it this way," McConnell said, referring to the reform bill fashioned in the Senate, where Democrats hold the majority. "They wouldn't be jamming it through in the middle of the night on the last weekend before Christmas."

Democratic senators on Saturday reached their goal of rounding up 60 votes supporting the health care legislation after U.S. Sen. Ben Nelson, who had been the lone Democratic holdout, reached an agreement that eased his concerns about abortion.

"Change is never easy, but change is what's necessary in America today. That's why I intend to vote for cloture and for health care reform," Nelson told reporters. Cloture means the Democrats needed the 60 votes to end debate on the health bill and send it to the Senate floor for a vote.

McConnell said the legislation "will have a profound impact on our nation. This is not renaming a post office. Make no mistake, this bill will reshape our nation and our lives."


Filed under: Mitch McConnell
December 19th, 2009
12:00 PM ET
December 19th, 2009
11:08 AM ET
11 months ago

Two health care bill liberal holdouts to say 'yes'

Two liberal U.S. senators have said they will vote 'yes' on the health care bill.
Two liberal U.S. senators have said they will vote 'yes' on the health care bill.

Washington (CNN) – Two liberal U.S. senators who had not committed to supporting the health care reform bill said Saturday they will vote "yes."

The holdouts were Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, an Independent who caucuses with the Democrats, and Sen. Sherrod Brown, an Ohio Democrat.

Sanders said he will vote for approval because the measure now contains provisions for new community health centers. Brown said he favored the insurance reforms in the legislation.

Neither of the men are totally pleased, but they told CNN it's a good first step.

Full story


Filed under: Congress
December 19th, 2009
10:30 AM ET
December 19th, 2009
10:09 AM ET
11 months ago

Sources: Dem leaders have eased senator's doubts on health bill

Democratic leaders have eased Sen. Nelson's doubts on the health bill.
Democratic leaders have eased Sen. Nelson's doubts on the health bill.

Washington (CNN) – U.S. Sen. Ben Nelson, the lone Democratic holdout on the Senate health care reform bill, has reached an agreement with Democratic leaders, several Democratic senators said Saturday on Capitol Hill.

Nelson, a social conservative from Nebraska who opposes abortion, does not want taxpayer funds to pay for that medical procedure. His vote is crucial for Democrats, who want to avoid a GOP filibuster.

The senators were said to be caucusing on the terms of the agreement.

Asked whether he was on board with it, Ben Nelson replied, "Yeah."

Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-California, who was one of the key senators involved in the talks with Ben Nelson, confirmed that she's satisfied that the language of the agreement achieves its goal.

"My goal was to try to reach some compromise so we could move forward on health care, where the basic premise was we could separate federal funds from private funds. I think we achieved that."

Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Florida, agreed, saying the deal follows the principles of the Hyde amendment, which prevents federal funds from being used for abortions.

"Anyone who is in the exchange who also gets a federal subsidy because they're poor, if they choose a private insurance policy and want any kind of abortion coverage, they have to write that part of the premium from their own personal funds," the Florida senator said.

The health bill proposes a health insurance exchange for those unable to afford health coverage or don't have coverage. No federal funds could be used to cover abortions for people participating in the exchange, the bill says.

In addition, under national plans that would be administered by the Office of Personnel Management, there has to be, if a state chooses those, at least one that does not offer abortion coverage.


Filed under: Barbara Boxer • Ben Nelson
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