April 14th, 2010
12:26 PM ET
5 years ago

Obama hopeful for quick financial reform bill

President Obama is confident that a bipartisan financial reform bill will be passed.
President Obama is confident that a bipartisan financial reform bill will be passed.

Washington (CNN) – President Barack Obama said Wednesday he is sure that a bipartisan financial reform bill can be passed.

During a meeting with congressional leaders on Wednesday, Obama told reporters that that he"is confident that we can work out an effective bipartisan package that assures that we"ll never have [banks that are] too big to fail again, that consumers are adequately protected."

Obama said he wants to move on a financial regulatory reform bill quickly and planned to discuss the matter with the group of bipartisan congressional leaders assembled at the White House.

The president also said he plans to discuss the vacancy at the Supreme Court and the ratification of the S.T.A.R.T., among other subjects.


Filed under: President Obama
April 14th, 2010
08:45 AM ET
April 14th, 2010
08:34 AM ET
5 years ago

CNN Poll: Who wins an Obama vs. Palin matchup?

A CNN/Opinion Research Corporation survey released Tuesday indicates that President Barack Obama would top the former Alaska governor by double digits in a possible 2012 general election showdown.
A CNN/Opinion Research Corporation survey released Tuesday indicates that President Barack Obama would top the former Alaska governor by double digits in a possible 2012 general election showdown.

Washington (CNN) - She may be the best known Republican politician considering a bid for the White House, but Sarah Palin comes in third in a hypothetical horserace for the next GOP presidential nomination, according to a new national poll.

A CNN/Opinion Research Corporation survey released Tuesday also indicates that President Barack Obama would top the former Alaska governor by double digits in a possible 2012 general election showdown.

Full results (pdf)

The survey found that 24 percent of Republicans and Republican leaning Independents say they would most likely support Mike Huckabee, the former Arkansas governor and 2008 GOP presidential candidate, in the battle for the 2012 GOP nomination. And 20 percent said they would back former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney, who also ran for the White House in 2008. Palin, who was Sen. John McCain's running mate in the last presidential election, came in third place with 15 percent, a point ahead of former House Speaker Newt Gingrich.

According to the poll, Rep. Ron Paul of Texas, another 2008 Republican presidential hopeful, would be in fifth place, with eight percent. Former Sen. Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania, Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty, Rep. Mike Pence of Indiana, and Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour all register in the lower single digits in the hypothetical 2012 GOP presidential nomination matchup.

FULL POST


Filed under: 2012 • Popular Posts • President Obama • Sarah Palin
April 14th, 2010
08:29 AM ET
5 years ago

Wall Street reform: Washington's next battle

With the health care fight and two weeks at home behind it, Congress is taking on proposals to reform Wall Street and prevent future financial collapses.
With the health care fight and two weeks at home behind it, Congress is taking on proposals to reform Wall Street and prevent future financial collapses.

Washington (CNNMoney.com) - With the health care fight and two weeks at home behind it, Congress is taking on proposals to reform Wall Street and prevent future financial collapses.

Nothing has really changed since the Senate Banking panel passed an overhaul measure along party lines in late March – except that the rhetoric on both sides has sharpened.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, came out swinging Tuesday, slamming Banking Committee chairman Christopher Dodd's bill as a "perpetual taxpayer bailout of Wall Street banks."

Full story


Filed under: Congress
April 14th, 2010
08:18 AM ET
5 years ago

CNN Poll: 1 in 10 say they're Tea Party activists

Ten percent of Americans say they have actively supported the Tea Party movement.
Ten percent of Americans say they have actively supported the Tea Party movement.

Washington (CNN) - Ten percent of Americans say they have actively supported the Tea Party movement, and those Tea Party activists are older, better educated and more religious than the general public, according to a new national poll.

O the Tea Party activists questioned in a CNN/Opinion Research Corporation survey released Wednesday morning, seven of ten call themselves conservatives. Nearly eight in ten would vote for a Republican candidate for Congress if the midterm elections were held today. Six in ten activists are male.

But the Tea Party movement, now in its 14th month, is not well-known to nearly half the country. Forty five percent of all Americans say they do not know enough about the Tea Party to say whether they support it or oppose it. Those who are familiar with the movement are divided right down the middle - 27 percent support the Tea Party movement, and 27 percent oppose it.

Full results (pdf)

One out of every ten people says they have donated money, attended a rally, or taken some other active step to support the Tea Party movement.

FULL POST


Filed under: CNN poll • Tea Party movement
April 14th, 2010
07:26 AM ET
5 years ago

Democrat wins special election in Florida

Democrat Ted Deutch won a special election Tuesday for a Florida congressional seat.
Democrat Ted Deutch won a special election Tuesday for a Florida congressional seat.

(CNN) – Democrat Ted Deutch won a special election Tuesday for a Florida congressional seat in the nation's first federal election since the passage of the Democrats' health care plan.

Deutch held a sizable lead over Republican Ed Lynch late Tuesday night in the Palm Beach-area 19th District, prompting Lynch to concede.

Deutch had 62 percent of the vote compared to Lynch's 36 percent with 97 percent of the precincts counted, CNN affiliate WFOR reported. The election was to fill the seat of Democrat Robert Wexler, who resigned at the beginning of the year to head up the Center for Middle East Peace

FULL POST


Filed under: Florida • Popular Posts
April 14th, 2010
06:17 AM ET
5 years ago

POLITICAL HOT TOPICS: April 14, 2010

ALT TEXT

The CNN Washington Bureau’s morning speed read of the top stories making news from around the country and the world.

WASHINGTON/POLITICAL
For the latest political news: www.CNNPolitics.com

CNN: Obama: 'Real progress' at nuclear summit
President Obama said Tuesday that the 47-nation nuclear security summit he convened raised global awareness of the threat of nuclear terrorism and yielded commitments to better secure nuclear arsenals and materials. At a news conference wrapping up the two-day summit, Obama cited steps taken by countries including Russia and other former Soviet states to eliminate some of the vulnerable vestiges of nuclear stockpiles from the Cold War era. Obama said the summit's final statement acknowledges the urgency and seriousness of the threat of nuclear terrorism and sets a goal for securing all the world's vulnerable nuclear materials in the next four years.

CNN: Michelle Obama, Jill Biden visit Mexico
Michelle Obama arrived in Mexico City Tuesday night at the start of her first solo official trip as first lady. Obama, fresh off an unannounced stop in Haiti, was greeted at Benito Juarez International Airport by Carlos Pascual, the U.S. ambassador to Mexico; and Arturo Sarukhan, the Mexican ambassador to the United States.

CNN: Obama to unveil vision for space program
President Obama will announce his administration's vision for America's space program during a visit to Florida on Thursday, according to documents provided to CNN by a White House official. The president's announcement will come during what have been uncertain times surrounding the agency. The space shuttle is scheduled for retirement at year's end, with just three scheduled launches remaining. The president has cancelled the Bush administration's Constellation moon program. Allard Beutel, news chief at the Kennedy Space Center, told CNN that layoffs at the center will likely reach "the 7,000 range" with the end of the shuttle and the cancellation of the Constellation program.

The Arizona Republic: Arizona House passes wide-ranging immigration bill
The Arizona House of Representatives has passed a wide-ranging bill that would put the state at the forefront of state control of immigration policy. Senate Bill 1070, among other things, makes it a crime to be in the country illegally and bars what its proponents call "sanctuary city" policies. It passed on a 35-21 vote, along party lines. All 35 Republicans supported the bill; all the Democrats present voted "no." Four Democrats were absent. The vote caps a hotly debated path through the Legislature and puts Arizona on the verge of having some of the toughest immigration laws in the nation.

CNN: McConnell tells GOP: Vote no on Wall Street bill
The Senate's top Republican on Tuesday called on Republicans to oppose the Democratic Wall Street reform bill because it does not adequately safeguard against the government's power to bail out massive banks in the future. The 1,300-page bill, sponsored by Senate Banking Committee Chairman Chris Dodd, D-Connecticut, aims to create a new consumer regulator housed inside the Federal Reserve to ensure consumers get a fair shake with mortgages and credit cards. It would also push banks and financial firms to strengthen capital cushions and create a new process for taking down giant failing companies and preventing future Wall Street bailouts.

Wall Street Journal: Banks Falter in Rules Fight
Senate Democrats, resisting a last-ditch lobbying push from big Wall Street firms, are moving toward a sweeping revamp of financial regulation that would squeeze banks' lucrative derivatives-trading business. Wall Street giants Goldman Sachs Group Inc., J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. and Morgan Stanley had been pressing hard in recent days to dilute provisions of the bill that would change the rules for derivatives trading. The bankers' lobbying has focused on the Senate Agriculture Committee, which Wall Street hoped would produce a friendlier bill than an alternative from the Senate Banking Committee. But it became clear Tuesday that the Agriculture Committee's chairman, Arkansas Democrat Blanche Lincoln, is now expected to introduce a bill with provisions that bankers oppose and the White House supports.

FULL POST


Filed under: Political Hot Topics
April 14th, 2010
06:00 AM ET
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