May 4th, 2010
12:12 PM ET
4 years ago

CNN Radio Political Notebook: Primary showdowns in 3 states

CNN's Paul Steinhauser offers a look at who's running where in Tuesday's primaries.


Related: Tuesday primary showdowns in three states

Subscribe to the Political Notebook podcast in iTunes


Filed under: 2010 • Indiana • North Carolina • Ohio
May 4th, 2010
11:58 AM ET
4 years ago

Obama to speak at Michigan high school commencement

 Do you remember who gave your high school commencement address?
Do you remember who gave your high school commencement address?

(CNN) - Do you remember who gave your high school commencement address?

For a group of Michigan high school students, it will be a moment they'll probably never forget. President Barack Obama announced Tuesday that he will deliver this year's graduation speech at Kalamazoo Central High School - the winner of the administration's first annual "Race to the Top High School Commencement Challenge."

"I congratulate our winner, Kalamazoo Central High School, and all of our six finalists for their innovative and effective approaches to teaching, learning and preparing students to graduate ready for college and a career," Obama said in a written statement. "I look forward to visiting and speaking at Kalamazoo Central High School later this spring."

The White House asked Americans to help pick a winning high school from a list of six finalists. The list was cut to three recently, the White House said. Obama chose the winner.
FULL POST


Filed under: Popular Posts • President Obama
May 4th, 2010
11:55 AM ET
4 years ago

Florida senator: Obama drilling plan 'dead on arrival'

Washington (CNN) - Democratic senators from two coastal states Tuesday called on President Barack Obama to reverse his call for expanded offshore oil exploration after a massive spill from a damaged well in the Gulf of Mexico.

"I will make it short and to the point: The president's proposal for offshore drilling is dead on arrival," Florida Sen. Bill Nelson told reporters.

Nelson and New Jersey Democrats Robert Menendez and Frank Lautenberg are also backing legislation that would raise the legal cap on damages oil companies must pay for oil spills from $75 million to $10 billion. BP, the company that owns the damaged well off the coast of Louisiana, must pay the full cost of cleanup - but Menendez said $75 million won't begin to compensate coastal communities for the costs the spill could inflict.
FULL POST


Filed under: Bill Nelson • Bob Menendez • Energy • Frank Lautenberg • New Jersey • President Obama
May 4th, 2010
11:33 AM ET
4 years ago

Obama: Those affected by spill should be employed in cleanup

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Idle fishing boats sat at the docks Monday in Pass Christian, Mississippi. (Photo Credit: Getty Images)

Washington (CNN) - President Barack Obama said Tuesday he would like to see the people most affected by the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico employed in the cleanup operation.

The president said the spill "is going to affect the lives and livelihoods of people" and the United States is committed to thwarting as much of the economic damage as possible.


Filed under: Energy • President Obama
May 4th, 2010
11:28 AM ET
4 years ago

Obama says 'justice will be done' in Times Square bombing

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Life quickly returned to normal in New York City's Times Square after Saturday's incident. (Photo Credit: Getty Images)

Washington (CNN) - President Barack Obama said Tuesday that "justice will be done" in the case of the attempted bombing at Times Square, and U.S. officials "will do everything in our power to protect the American people."

The failed bombing is "another sobering reminder of the times in which we live," the president told an audience of business leaders. But the United States "will be vigilant" and "will not cower in fear."
FULL POST


Filed under: Homeland Security • President Obama • Terrorism
May 4th, 2010
10:54 AM ET
4 years ago

Poll: Majority support Arizona immigration law, with reservations

Washington (CNN) - A majority of Americans support Arizona's tough new immigration law, even though most of them think it could lead to racial profiling, according to a new national poll. A CBS/New York Times survey released Tuesday also indicates that Americans overwhelming believe that the country's immigration laws need to be changed.

Fifty-one percent of people questioned in the poll say the new legislation, which Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer signed into law on April 23, is about right, with another nine percent saying it doesn't go far enough and 36 percent saying it goes too far in its scope. But more than eight in ten questioned say its very or somewhat likely that the new law will lead to police officers detaining people of certain racial or ethnic groups more frequently than other racial or ethnic groups.

The new Arizona law requires immigrants to carry their alien registration documents at all times and requires police to question people if there is reason to suspect they are in the United States illegally. The measure also makes it a state crime to live in or travel through Arizona illegally.

FULL POST


Filed under: Arizona • Immigration • Popular Posts
May 4th, 2010
10:41 AM ET
4 years ago

'Bush-ama' tax cuts: The $2.2 trillion decision

Proposing they be extended indefinitely for most Americans, President Obama has embraced the tax relief measures introduced in 2001 and 2003 by former President George W. Bush.
Proposing they be extended indefinitely for most Americans, President Obama has embraced the tax relief measures introduced in 2001 and 2003 by former President George W. Bush.

New York (CNNMoney.com) - They're often called the "Bush" tax cuts. But at this point they might as well be called the Bush-ama tax cuts.

That's because President Obama has embraced the tax relief measures introduced in 2001 and 2003, proposing they be extended indefinitely for most Americans. If lawmakers do nothing, the measures expire Dec. 31.

The tax cuts lowered income and investment tax rates, boosted the child credit, reduced the estate tax, and narrowed inequalities affecting married taxpayers.

Another reason for the new Bush-ama moniker: Like President Bush, President Obama has not called on Congress to pay for the cost of the tax cuts. In fact, the extension of the cuts is exempt from the new "pay-go" rules that Obama signed into law recently.

Extending the tax cuts for most Americans will increase the federal deficit by an estimated $2.2 trillion over 10 years.

Deficit hawks are uber-frustrated.

Full story on CNNMoney.com


Filed under: George W. Bush • national debt • President Obama • Taxes
May 4th, 2010
09:35 AM ET
4 years ago

Poll: Specter's lead over Sestak shrinking

A new poll out Tuesday indicates that Sen. Arlen Specter's lead in the Pennsylvania Democratic primary is shrinking.
A new poll out Tuesday indicates that Sen. Arlen Specter's lead in the Pennsylvania Democratic primary is shrinking.

(CNN) - With two weeks to go until Pennsylvania's primary, a new poll indicates that Rep. Joe Sestak is narrowing the gap with Sen. Arlen Specter in the Democratic Senate nomination battle.

According to a Quinnipiac University survey released Tuesday, Specter leads Sestak 47 percent to 39 percent among likely Democratic primary voters, with 14 percent undecided. Thirty-five percent of people who say they have picked a candidate indicate they still may change their mind. Specter's eight-point edge is down from a 21-point advantage in a Quinnipiac poll released April 7.

Specter, a five-term senator, switched parties from Republican to Democrat last spring. At the time of the party switch, he cited the difficulty in winning the Republican primary against Pat Toomey as a factor. Toomey, the Republican candidate in the race, is a former congressman and former head of the Club for Growth, a limited-government and anti-tax organization.
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Filed under: 2010 • Arlen Specter • Joe Sestak • Pennsylvania • Poll • Popular Posts
May 4th, 2010
09:08 AM ET
4 years ago

Geithner: Risk-taking banks should bear bailout burden

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner on Tuesday is slated to detail the administration's proposal to bill Wall Street for last year's bailouts, instead of taxpayers.
Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner on Tuesday is slated to detail the administration's proposal to bill Wall Street for last year's bailouts, instead of taxpayers.

New York (CNNMoney.com) - Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner told lawmakers Tuesday that banks that took the most risks during the financial crisis, and required government aid, should pay the most toward recouping bailout costs.

In prepared testimony for the Senate Finance Committee, Geithner said the proposed Financial Crisis Responsibility Fee could raise about $90 billion over 10 years.

"We designed the fee so that it would fall most heavily on firms that fund riskier activities with less stable forms of funding," Geithner said in his testimony, adding that over 99% of banks would be excluded from the fee.

Updated: 10:34 a.m.

Full story on CNNMoney.com

May 4th, 2010
08:47 AM ET
4 years ago

Senator: 'BP says it'll pay for this mess. Baloney.'

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On Monday, the lawmakers introduced legislation to do away with an existing $75 million cap on oil companies for damages resulting from spills, such as loss of tourism revenue. (Photo Credit: Getty Images)

(CNN) - Lawmakers will meet with environmental groups Tuesday to gauge the impact from an explosion aboard a BP oil rig that uncorked a gusher of oil off the coast of Louisiana.

Democratic senators Frank Lautenberg and Robert Menendez of New Jersey along with Bill Nelson of Florida will talk to officials from the Sierra Club and Environment America to discuss courses of action as the impact of a potential disaster continues to unfold.

On Monday, the lawmakers introduced legislation to do away with an existing $75 million cap on oil companies for damages resulting from spills, such as loss of tourism revenue.

The senators want to raise the cap to $10 billion.

"BP says it'll pay for this mess. Baloney," said Nelson, referring to the oil giant that owns the well at the heart of the problem.

"They're not going to want to pay any more than what the law says they have to, which is why we can't let them off the hook."

BP chief executive, Tony Hayward, has vowed that company would "absolutely be paying for the clean-up operation" of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

"Where legitimate claims are made, we will be good for them," he told NPR's "Morning Edition."

But the feds were leaving little to chance.

Full story


Filed under: Congress • Energy • Obama administration
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