May 14th, 2010
04:35 AM ET
5 years ago

Hawaii can ignore repeated requests for pres. birth certificate

President Obama’s certification of live birth.
President Obama’s certification of live birth.

Washington (CNN) - Hawaii would like for so-called "birthers" to stop asking to see President Obama's birth certificate.

The state passed a law on Wednesday that allows state agencies to ignore repeated requests to view government records, including the president's birth document. Hawaii's Republican Gov. Linda Lingle signed the legislation into law.

This will impact requests from a fringe movement dubbed the "birthers." Adherents question President Obama's constitutional eligibility to be commander-in-chief, suggesting he was not born in the United States despite proof that he was born in Hawaii in 1961. CNN and other news organizations have thoroughly debunked the rumors about the president's birthplace.

Hawaii has released a copy of the president’s birth certificate – officially called a “certificate of live birth” – and the hospital took out ads in two Hawaiian newspapers announcing the 1961 birth.

But adherents to the “birther” theories persist. Army surgeon Lt. Col. Terry Lakin subscribes to the “birther” theory and faces a court martial for refusing to deploy to Afghanistan unless the president shows his birth certificate. He disputes that the Hawaii birth certificate is real.

“I believe we need truth on this matter,” he said in an interview earlier this week on CNN’s Anderson Cooper 360.

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Filed under: Birthers • Hawaii • President Obama
May 14th, 2010
04:33 AM ET
5 years ago

POLITICAL HOT TOPICS: Friday, May 14, 2010

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The CNN Washington Bureau’s morning speed read of the top stories making news from around the country and the world.

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For the latest political news: www.CNNPolitics.com

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CNN: Hawaii can ignore repeated requests for pres. birth certificate
Hawaii would like for so-called "birthers" to stop asking to see President Obama's birth certificate. The state passed a law on Wednesday that allows state agencies to ignore repeated requests to view government records, including the president's birth document. Hawaii's Republican Gov. Linda Lingle signed the legislation into law. This will impact requests from a fringe movement dubbed the "birthers." Adherents question President Obama's constitutional eligibility to be commander-in-chief, suggesting he was not born in the United States despite proof that he was born in Hawaii in 1961.

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House leaders are revamping the rules for lawmakers and aides who travel overseas on official government business, forbidding them to fly in business class on shorter trips, use taxpayer funds to buy gifts or pocket unspent cash, among other changes. The new travel rules, proposed by Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California, also strengthen accountability and oversight for taxpayer-funded trips. But the rules don't require lawmakers to disclose some of the biggest costs of such trips, including travel by military plane, which can double or triple the total costs. The changes are the first significant made to the House's travel rules in more than 30 years.

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Post and Courier: Palin backs Haley for S.C. governor
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