May 17th, 2010
10:30 AM ET
May 17th, 2010
10:25 AM ET
4 years ago

Feds to step up monitoring of global press freedom

 President Obama will sign the Daniel Pearl Freedom of the Press Act Monday.
President Obama will sign the Daniel Pearl Freedom of the Press Act Monday.

Washington (CNN) - President Barack Obama is set to sign legislation Monday expanding the federal government's role in monitoring global freedom of the press, according to the White House.

Obama will sign the Daniel Pearl Freedom of the Press Act, which requires a greater examination of the status of press freedoms in different countries in the State Department's Annual Country Reports on Human Rights Practices.

Among other things, the State Department will be required to "identify countries in which there were violations of press freedom; determine whether the government authorities of those countries participate in ... or condone the violations; and report the actions such governments have taken to preserve the safety and independence of the media," according to a statement from Sen. Chris Dodd, D-Connecticut, one of the bill's primary sponsors.

FULL POST


Filed under: President Obama
May 17th, 2010
10:04 AM ET
4 years ago

Housing market diagnosis: Bipolar

Bipolar is what comes to mind when diagnosing the post-homebuyer tax credit market.
Bipolar is what comes to mind when diagnosing the post-homebuyer tax credit market.

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) - Bipolar is what comes to mind when diagnosing the post-homebuyer tax credit market. There are two separate forces pulling it in opposite directions, and experts aren't yet sure which path the market will take.

On one hand, sales and prices are rising, indicating recovery. On the other hand, so are interest rates and repossessions, which most certainly do not. And then there are the millions of foreclosures that need to be sold but haven't yet been listed - so-called shadow inventory - that could derail a real recovery if they hit the market in floods.

The prognosis? Negative short term but turning positive by the end of 2010.

Full story


Filed under: Economy
May 17th, 2010
09:57 AM ET
May 17th, 2010
09:44 AM ET
4 years ago

Kentucky GOP candidates campaign as Tea Party impact is weighed

Rand Paul campaigns in Kentucky one day before the Senate primary there.
Rand Paul campaigns in Kentucky one day before the Senate primary there.

Corbin, Kentucky (CNN) – The two top Republicans vying for the Senate GOP nomination will be barnstorming the state Monday looking for a last minute boost of support and jostling over everything from farm subsidies and the future of coal to whether the state should continue to receive congressional earmarks.

But one of the key questions for those in the state, as well as the national observers looking at this primary, is what impact will the anti-tax, anti-Washington Tea Party movement have on this race?

Rand Paul, an ophthalmologist and first-time political candidate, has drawn a large amount of support from Tea Party activists in the state that has helped propel him into the lead, according to recent Louisville Courier-Journal/WHAS Bluegrass Polls.

FULL POST


Filed under: Rand Paul • Trey Grayson
May 17th, 2010
09:37 AM ET
4 years ago

GM back in the black

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) - General Motors returned to profitability in the first three months of the year, the automaker's first profit since 2007.

The company, which emerged from bankruptcy last July, earned $865 million in the period, on revenue of $31.5 billion. A year ago the predecessor company lost nearly $6 billion on revenue of only $22.4 billion, as sales plunged and the company hurdled toward bankruptcy.

GM had reported losses the two previous quarters since emerging from bankruptcy, but the profit in the most recent period was expected.

Full story


Filed under: General Motors
May 17th, 2010
09:25 AM ET
4 years ago

No room for error in Pennsylvania nail biter

Specter is fighting for his political career one day before the Senate primary.
Specter is fighting for his political career one day before the Senate primary.

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (CNN) – Sen. Arlen Specter and Rep. Joe Sestak are spending the closing hours of this bitter primary for the Senate Democratic nomination hunting for votes, as two final public polls show that the race is too close too call.

Specter and Sestak are making multiple stops throughout the state in an effort to rally support before Pennsylvania Democrats head to the polls Tuesday to choose their nominee for the November election.

A Quinnipiac University Poll released Monday morning shows that Sestak holds a 1 point lead over Specter, 42 percent to 41 percent, well within the survey’s 3.2 point margin of error. The Quinnipiac poll also shows that 16 percent of Democratic primary voters remain undecided and 25 percent of those who stated a preference for a candidate noted they could change their vote.

Quinnipiac’s results are similar to the Muhlenberg College/Morning Call Democratic Primary Tracking Poll. That survey has Specter heading into Tuesday’s contest with a 2 point lead over Sestak, 45 percent to 43 percent - also comfortably within the poll’s 5 point margin of error.

CNN Radio: Primaries in four states Tuesday could spell trouble for the incumbents.


FULL POST


Filed under: 2010 • Arlen Specter • Joe Sestak • Pennsylvania • Polls • Popular Posts
May 17th, 2010
04:27 AM ET
4 years ago

'I had a clear shot at re-election,' Specter says

(CNN) - Just days before he stands before Pennsylvania’s Democratic primary voters, Sen. Arlen Specter, a former Republican, sought to cast his party switch of a year ago as a matter of principle rather than self-interested politics.

Related: Sestak slams Specter as 'poster child' for what's wrong with Washington

“For years, I've tried to moderate the Republican Party,” Specter, a five-term incumbent, said Sunday on CNN’s State of the Union. “And when the stimulus came up and President Obama asked me for his support - for my support, and it looked like we were sliding into a 1929 depression, I sided with President Obama.

“It wasn't my job to be saved. It was the jobs of thousands of Pennsylvanians and Americans.

“Look here, I had a clear shot at re-election. If I had stayed with the obstructionist Republican caucus, I would have been re-elected easily, especially in an out-year when the party out of power is favored.”

Specter added that he was at odds with the GOP because of his vote in favor of President Obama’s $787 billion stimulus package.

Asked by CNN Chief Political Correspondent Candy Crowley about the anti-incumbent mood in the country with midterm elections six months away, Specter championed his record of ideological independence during his three decades in the Senate.
FULL POST


Filed under: 2010 • Arlen Specter • Joe Sestak • Pennsylvania • State of the Union
May 17th, 2010
04:23 AM ET
4 years ago

POLITICAL HOT TOPICS: Monday, MAY 17, 2010

ALT TEXT

The CNN Washington Bureau’s morning speed read of the top stories making news from around the country and the world.

WASHINGTON/POLITICAL
For the latest political news: www.CNNPolitics.com

Los Angeles Times: Tuesday primaries may be first expressions of voters' wrath
With anger all around, voters in three states will signal on Tuesday the depth of the country's anti-establishment mood, which threatens lawmakers in both parties and raises prospects for an even more polarized Congress after November. On the left, two veteran U.S. senators, Democrats Blanche Lincoln of Arkansas and Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania, are fighting for political survival, despite the support of party leaders from President Obama on down. On the right, the hand-picked candidate of Kentucky Sen. Mitch McConnell, the GOP leader on Capitol Hill, is struggling to rally against a "tea party" insurgent who spends nearly as much time criticizing Republicans as he does Democrats. More broadly, Tuesday's primaries could test Obama's campaign vow to achieve a more harmonious Washington.

CNN: 'I had a clear shot at re-election,' Specter says
Just days before he stands before Pennsylvania’s Democratic primary voters, Sen. Arlen Specter, a former Republican, sought to cast his party switch of a year ago as a matter of principle rather than self-interested politics. Specter added that he was at odds with the GOP because of his vote in favor of President Obama’s $787 billion stimulus package. Asked by CNN Chief Political Correspondent Candy Crowley about the anti-incumbent mood in the country with midterm elections six months away, Specter championed his record of ideological independence during his three decades in the Senate.

CNN: Sestak: Specter's 'a poster child' for what's wrong in Washington
Two days before voters go to the polls in Pennsylvania’s closely watched Democratic Senate primary, Rep. Joe Sestak predicted Sunday he will emerge victorious over longtime Sen. Arlen Specter, partly because of the public’s anti-incumbent, anti-Washington mood. The latest polls show Sestak, once the underdog against Specter’s 30 years of incumbency, is now in a virtual tie with him and running competitively in a possible general election match-up against the likely Republican nominee.

New York Times: In Three Primaries, a Vital Test of the Tea Party’s Strength
Rand Paul grabbed a microphone, climbed onto a short brick wall and told a gathering crowd of supporters to brace for an Election Day uprising on Tuesday. If his confidence is borne out by victory, it would mark one of the most important moments yet for the Tea Party, the anti-Washington, anti-big government movement that was partially inspired by the quixotic 2008 presidential race of his father, Representative Ron Paul of Texas. Establishment Republicans — including Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the minority leader, former Vice President Dick Cheney and the Chamber of Commerce — have united in opposition to Mr. Paul, but optimism was diminishing that their candidate, Trey Grayson, could prevail.

Washington Post: TARP becomes prime target for senators facing reelection battles
It was the chant heard around the Senate: Angry GOP delegates in Utah calling out "TARP! TARP! TARP!" as they tossed Sen. Robert F. Bennett from the primary ballot, punishment for the veteran lawmaker's 2008 vote to bail out the financial sector. Now, as the Senate works through a massive regulatory overhaul bill, some lawmakers are using the legislation as an opportunity to redeem themselves in the eyes of an angry electorate - a second chance to get on the right side of the Wall Street vs. Main Street argument.

Washington Post: Palin calls Fiorina and other Republican candidates 'mama grizzlies'
Sarah Palin appears to be building a pack of "mama grizzlies" in the 2010 elections that could send a powerful political message if she decides to run for president in 2012. In the past 10 days, Palin has thrown her endorsement behind former Hewlett-Packard executive Carly Fiorina, who is running for the Republican Senate nomination in California; state Rep. Nikki Haley, a candidate for governor in South Carolina; and Susana Martinez, the Dona Ana County district attorney seeking the GOP nod in the New Mexico governor's race. All three of the races in which Palin endorsed feature a female candidate running against one - or several - men.

FULL POST


Filed under: Political Hot Topics
newer posts »