June 3rd, 2010
02:30 PM ET
5 years ago

Arizona governor, Obama meet on immigration

ALT TEXT

The president and Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer, a Republican, met Thursday at the White House. (Photo Credit: Pete Souza/Official White House Photo)

Washington (CNN) – Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer emerged from a meeting Thursday with President Barack Obama and said the two had "agreed to work together in order to find some solution" to the immigration issue.

Brewer, who signed the state's immigration law that Obama has called misguided, described the tone of the talks as "very cordial" but said disagreements remained. "We know we're not going to agree on some issues until other issues are worked out," she told reporters.

Brewer said Obama agreed to send staffers to Arizona "in a couple of weeks" to discuss using federal resources to tighten the border, including the allocation of 1,200 National Guard troops and $500 million.

"He assured us that the majority of those resources would be coming to Arizona," Brewer said.

She added, "I am encouraged there is going to be much better dialogue between the federal government and the state of Arizona. I hope that that's not wishful thinking; I hope that that's positive thinking."

The meeting came after the governor said this week she is not worried about a potential legal challenge from the Obama administration over the law.

"We'll meet you in court," Brewer told CNN's "John King, USA." "I have a pretty good record of winning in court."

Full story

Updated: 3:20 p.m.

Related: We'll see you in court, Brewer tells Obama


Filed under: Arizona • Immigration • Jan Brewer • President Obama
June 3rd, 2010
02:26 PM ET
5 years ago

RNC weighs in on arrest of ex-Florida party chair

The RNC spoke out in response to the arrest of ex-Florida GOP chairman Jim Greer, calling the accusations 'unacceptable.'
The RNC spoke out in response to the arrest of ex-Florida GOP chairman Jim Greer, calling the accusations 'unacceptable.'

Washington (CNN) – The Republican National Committee broke its silence Thursday regarding the arrest of ex-Florida GOP chairman Jim Greer, one of Chairman Michael Steele's top supporters during his 2009 bid to lead the committee.

Greer was arrested Wednesday and charged with six felony counts stemming from a grand jury investigation into his activities while serving as chairman of the Republican Party of Florida. Prosecutors allege that Greer set up a shell company in February 2009 to funnel money from the state party into his personal bank account.

RNC spokesman Doug Heye called the accusations "unacceptable" and said donors "have a right to know that that their hard earned money is being used, as they expect, to elect candidates who stand for their principles."

"We have complete confidence in the judicial system of the State of Florida and look forward to justice being served," Heye said in a statement to CNN. "Sweetheart deals and personal enrichment are every bit as unacceptable as the offering of political appointments to keep Democratic candidates out of primaries."

After endorsing Steele three weeks before last January's hotly-contested election, Greer quickly became one of Steele's most prominent backers within the RNC. Steele later backed Greer to chair the powerful RNC Rules Committee, a position Greer gave up when he resigned as Florida GOP chairman earlier this year under pressure from party activists upset his with handling of party funds.

Greer, who once considered his own bid to head the RNC, was also one of Steele's top financial backers during the six-way race for the chairmanship.

On Jan. 28, 2009, two days before Steele's victory, Greer directed $15,000 from his campaign 527 account to the "Steele for Chairman" committee, according to publicly available filings with the IRS. It was one of the largest direct contributions to Steele's bid by any donor.

FULL POST


Filed under: Florida • Jim Greer • Michael Steele • RNC
June 3rd, 2010
01:31 PM ET
5 years ago

Palin records robocall for Nikki Haley

Sarah Palin has recorded an automated phone call urging Republicans to vote for Nikki Haley in the South Carolina GOP primary.’
Sarah Palin has recorded an automated phone call urging Republicans to vote for Nikki Haley in the South Carolina GOP primary.’

(CNN) - Sarah Palin has recorded an automated phone call urging Republicans in South Carolina to vote for Nikki Haley, her chosen candidate in next Tuesday's GOP gubernatorial primary.

The former Alaska governor endorsed Haley last month, is featured in one of her television ads and has been one of Haley's staunchest defenders in the wake of two separate allegations of infidelity that have roiled the governor's race.

In the robocall launched Thursday, Palin tells voters she is "calling on behalf of my good friend, and a brave and strong conservative woman, Nikki Haley."

Palin says that Haley's rivals are attacking her with "made-up nonsense to try to knock you down."

"Believe me, I've been there," Palin says in the recording. "But you can make your own statement against these unfair attacks, and you can help take back state government, by voting for the real deal conservative, Nikki Haley on Tuesday."

Haley's campaign manager Tim Pearson said in a statement that "few people know better than Sarah Palin what it means for a conservative reformer to take on the establishment – and the blowback that comes with it."

During the 2008 presidential campaign, Palin criticized the practice of dialing voters with recorded campaign messages, saying that voters get "irritated" by such calls. But she has since recorded phone messages for other Republican candidates.

Haley's opponents in the primary are Lt. Gov. Andre Bauer, Attorney General Henry McMaster and Rep. Gresham Barrett. Unless one of the candidates earns more than 50 percent of the vote next Tuesday – an unlikely prospect – the race will head to a runoff between to the top two finishers.

Listen to the robocall here.


Filed under: Nikki Haley • Sarah Palin • South Carolina
June 3rd, 2010
01:13 PM ET
5 years ago

Polls: Obama at 48 percent approval at 500 day mark

President Obama's approval rating is at 48 percent.
President Obama's approval rating is at 48 percent.

Washington (CNN) - As President Barack Obama marks 500 days in the White House, a new average of the most recent national polls indicates that less than half of the public approves of the job he's doing in office.

According to a CNN Poll of Polls, 48 percent of Americans approve of the job Obama's doing, with 45 percent saying they disapprove of the president's performance. This stands in sharp contrast to Obama's popularity after his first 100 days in office, which was at 63 percent in a CNN Poll of Polls compiled for that occassion.

The CNN Poll of Polls' Thursday release comes on the president's 500th day in the White House, with the count starting on January 20, 2009, the day Obama was inaugurated. The CNN Poll of Polls consists of the six surveys conducted in late May and early June: Fox (May 18-19), NBC (May 20-23), CNN/Opinion Research Corporation (May 21-23), Quinnipiac University (May 19-24), CBS (May 20-24) and the Gallup tracking poll (May 29-June 1). The CNN Poll of Polls does not have a sampling error.

"Obama's administration has had a lot of ups and downs this year, but the average of his approval ratings has remained relatively stable," says CNN Polling Director Keating Holland. "His average approval rating has hovered between 48 percent and 50 percent throughout 2010, and for the past three months, it has ben at either 48 or 49 percent."

So how does Obama's approval rating at the 500 day mark compare to his most recent predecessors?

FULL POST


Filed under: Poll • Popular Posts • President Obama
June 3rd, 2010
01:10 PM ET
5 years ago

Larry Craig falls victim to the Daily Show

Larry Craig is the latest politician to experience firsthand the pitfalls of granting an interview to Comedy Central's The Daily Show.
Larry Craig is the latest politician to experience firsthand the pitfalls of granting an interview to Comedy Central's The Daily Show.

(CNN) – Former Idaho Sen. Larry Craig is the latest politician to experience firsthand the pitfalls of granting an interview to Comedy Central's The Daily Show.

The Idaho Republican did not run for reelection in 2008 following his 2007 guiltily plea for disorderly conduct in an airport restroom. Craig, who is married, was accused by an undercover police officer of soliciting sex in the men's restroom at the Minneapolis-St. Paul airport. A later effort by Craig to withdraw his guilty plea was rejected by the Minnesota Court of Appeals.

Daily Show correspondent John Oliver said that Craig agreed to sit down for the interview as long as he was not asked about the incident. But in a story that aired Wednesday, Craig could not escape talk of airports.

"What was your favorite perk in your time in the Senate?" Oliver asked the former senator.
"When I was rushing to National Airport to catch a plane to Idaho, because I became a very aggressive commuter, I came back to my state a lot, that parking slot at National Airport to me was a big perk," a smiling Craig said.

"There aren't a lot of perks left," he cluelessly continued. "I don't have to rack up three-quarters of a million miles of air travel to stay involved helping citizens do certain things they need done."

The former senator also said he no longer missed his days in the Senate, but had difficulty adjusting to life as a private citizen at first.

"In the first couple of months, every time I'd have that feeling, I'd run, lay down on the couch, cover myself up with a blanket, take deep breaths and it would pass."


Filed under: Larry Craig • Popular Posts
June 3rd, 2010
01:01 PM ET
5 years ago

Granholm declares Galarraga's gem a perfect game

Detroit pitcher Armando Galarraga was robbed of a perfect game Wednesday night.
Detroit pitcher Armando Galarraga was robbed of a perfect game Wednesday night.

Washington (CNN) - Just one day after Detroit Tigers' pitcher Armando Galarraga was robbed of a perfect game by a heartbreaking missed call, Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm is ripping up the scorecard and proclaiming the game perfect.

Noting that umpire Jim Joyce admitted he was mistaken in calling Indians player Jason Donald safe at first base with a perfect game on the line in the ninth inning, Granholm is fixing the mistake, even if Major League Baseball won't.

"Now, Therefore, be it Resolved that I, Jennifer M. Granholm, governor of the state of Michigan, do hereby declare Armando Galarraga to have pitched a perfect game, and I join Tigers fans all across the globe in saluting his unassailable accomplishment – the first perfect game in Tigers history," the proclamation reads.

Outcry against umpire Jim Joyce has been fierce Thursday. The New York Times called the botched call "easily the most egregious blown call in baseball over the last 25 years."

And the umpire himself – while not allowed to view an instant replay during the game – knew the score afterward.

FULL POST


Filed under: Jennifer Granholm • Michigan
June 3rd, 2010
11:00 AM ET
5 years ago

Romanoff details White House contact over possible job

The White House is backing Sen. Bennett in the Colorado Democratic primary.
The White House is backing Sen. Bennett in the Colorado Democratic primary.

Washington (CNN) – A Colorado Senate candidate, who is challenging Sen. Michael Bennet in the Democratic primary, said Wednesday that a senior White House aide suggested last year that three administration jobs might be open to him if he abandoned plans to run against Bennet. But the candidate, former Colorado House Speaker Andrew Romanoff, also noted that he was never offered a position by the White House.

"In September 2009, shortly after the news media first reported my plans to run for the Senate, I received a call from Jim Messina, the president's deputy chief of staff. Mr. Messina informed me that the White House would support Sen. Bennet. I informed Mr. Messina that I had made my decision to run," Romanoff said in a statement released early Wednesday evening. "Mr. Messina also suggested three positions that might be available to me were I not pursuing the Senate race. He added that he could not guarantee my appointment to any of these positions. At no time was I promised a job, nor did I request Mr. Messina's assistance in obtaining one."

Romanoff said later that day he received an email from Messina with descriptions of three positions. Romanoff includes an attachment of what he says is the email from Messina, which is dated Friday, September 11, 2009. The three positions listed in the email are Deputy Assistant Administrator for Latin America and Caribbean, USAID, Director of the Office of Democracy and Governance, USAID, and Director of the US Trade and Development Agency, USTDA.

FULL POST


Filed under: 2010 • Andrew Romanoff • Colorado • Michael Bennet • Obama administration
June 3rd, 2010
10:58 AM ET
5 years ago

Poll: Tea Party candidate in Nevada surging

(CNN) – A new poll suggests that a Tea Party-backed candidate is now in the lead in the battle for Nevada's Republican Senate nomination.

According to a Suffolk University Political Research Center survey released Thursday morning, 33 percent state GOP voters back Sharron Angle in Tuesday's primary. The former member of the Nevada Assembly has won the endorsements and help in recent months of many conservative organizations, including the Tea Party Express and the Club for Growth.

Angle has aggressively touted her connection to Tea Party activists, calling the movement "a tsunami of conservatism across this country."

FULL POST


Filed under: 2010 • Nevada • Popular Posts • Tea Party Express • Tea Party movement
June 3rd, 2010
10:35 AM ET
5 years ago

Bush: No regrets for waterboarding

Former President George W. Bush said Wednesday he has no regrets about authorizing the controversial waterboarding technique to interrogate terrorist suspects.
Former President George W. Bush said Wednesday he has no regrets about authorizing the controversial waterboarding technique to interrogate terrorist suspects.

(CNN) - In some of his most candid comments since leaving the White House, former President George W. Bush said Wednesday he has no regrets about authorizing the controversial waterboarding technique to interrogate terrorist suspects and wouldn't hesitate to do so again.

"Yeah, we waterboarded Khalid Sheikh Mohammed," the former president said during an appearance at the Economic Club of Grand Rapids, Michigan, according to the Grand Rapids Press.

"I'd do it again to save lives," he added.

In a question-and-answer session following his speech to the group of local business leaders, the former president also defended his 2003 decision to invade Iraq.

FULL POST


Filed under: George W. Bush • Homeland Security • Popular Posts • Terrorism
June 3rd, 2010
10:16 AM ET
5 years ago

UPDATE: Obama to visit Gulf Coast Friday

(CNN) - President Barack Obama will visit the Gulf Coast region Friday, the White House announced.

"On Friday, June 4, President Barack Obama will return to the Louisiana Gulf Coast to assess the latest efforts to counter the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. More details will be released later today," the White House said in a statement.


Filed under: President Obama
« older posts
newer posts »