August 1st, 2010
07:04 PM ET
4 years ago

Palin: Brewer has the 'cojones' that Obama does not

In a television interview that aired Sunday, former Gov. Palin used a distinctly masculine metaphor to describe how Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer, left, and President Obama are approaching border security.
In a television interview that aired Sunday, former Gov. Palin used a distinctly masculine metaphor to describe how Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer, left, and President Obama are approaching border security.

(CNN) – Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin has come to the defense once again of one of her fellow "mama grizzlies" but this time using a distinctly masculine metaphor.

In the wake of the Obama administration's partial judicial victory last week in the litigation over Arizona's controversial immigration law, Palin said on "Fox News Sunday" that Arizona's female Republican governor has "the cojones that our president does not" when it comes to securing America's borders.

"This is a temporary suspension of some of the key elements in the law that [Arizona Gov.] Jan Brewer pushed hard for Arizonans and for the rest of the country to have the result of us being more secure," said Palin.

She added, "And, Jan Brewer, bless her heart, she's going to do all that she can to continue down the litigation path to allow secure borders because she's – Jan Brewer has the cojones that our president does not have to look out for all Americans – not just Arizonans – but all Americans in this desire of ours to secure our borders and allow legal immigration to help build this country. . . . if our own president will not enforce a federal law, more power to Jan Brewer . . . to do what our president won't do."

According to Merriam-Webster.com, the word "cojones" is a Spanish term for male reproductive organs. It also can be used as slang for "nerve" or "boldness."
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Filed under: 2012 • Immigration • Jan Brewer • Popular Posts • President Obama • Sarah Palin
August 1st, 2010
06:30 PM ET
4 years ago

AP takes over coveted White House briefing room seat

The White House Correspondents Association has decided which media outlet gets the prime seat in the White House briefing room once held by Helen Thomas.
The White House Correspondents Association has decided which media outlet gets the prime seat in the White House briefing room once held by Helen Thomas.

(CNN) - The Associated Press has won the political version of musical chairs, beating out Fox News, Bloomberg and National Public Radio to win the coveted front row, center seat of the White House briefing room left vacant by Helen Thomas' retirement in June, the White House Correspondents Association announced Sunday.

The change will take effect Monday, the association said.

Fox effectively came in second in the battle - the subject of weeks of speculation on such Inside the Beltway blogs as Politico. The network will move from its current second-row position into AP's former front row seat, while NPR will now move into the second row next to Bloomberg vacated by Fox.

Full story


Filed under: Fox News • Helen Thomas • White House
August 1st, 2010
04:51 PM ET
4 years ago

RNC cancels Breitbart fundraiser

Conservative blogger Andrew Breitbart, pictured, was scheduled to appear with RNC Chairman Michael Steele at a reception later this month in Beverly Hills.
Conservative blogger Andrew Breitbart, pictured, was scheduled to appear with RNC Chairman Michael Steele at a reception later this month in Beverly Hills.

Washington (CNN) – The Republican National Committee has cancelled a fundraiser with conservative blogger Andrew Breitbart, who is under fire for promoting an edited video that falsely portrays former Agriculture Department employee Shirley Sherrod as having boasted about discriminating against a white farmer looking for her assistance.

Breitbart was scheduled to appear with RNC Chairman Michael Steele at a reception later this month in Beverly Hills.

“We are working on scheduling and we fully plan to have another event scheduled soon based on our existing trips to California,” an RNC spokesman said in a statement sent to CNN.

The spokesman said the fundraiser was cancelled “To better capitalize on the fall fundraising season that happens post-Labor Day, while also lowering costs by utilizing existing trips to California.”

Breitbart has been under fire for posting the video clip of Sherrod that led to a rush to judgment and Sherrod's forced resignation. She was later vindicated when her speech to a chapter of the NAACP was shown in full. Sherrod said on Friday that she will sue Breitbart.

Update: An RNC spokesman tells CNN that Breitbart will be invited to the next California fundraiser this fall. “The invitation stands,” said the spokesman, who noted they are looking for “an alternative date.”


Filed under: Andrew Breitbart • RNC
August 1st, 2010
03:59 PM ET
4 years ago

Rules for Afghanistan: Fight Taliban, corruption, 'drink lots of tea'

ALT TEXT

Gen. David Petraeus, pictured here meeting with Afghan President Hamid Karzai, told troops in the war torn country that "The decisive terrain is the human terrain. The people are the center of gravity."
(Photo Credit: Getty Images/File)

(CNN) - Fight the Taliban "relentlessly." Don't tolerate corruption. Drink "lots of tea" with the locals.

Those admonitions are among the two dozen guidelines for counterinsurgency warfare that Gen. David Petraeus issued to U.S. and allied troops in Afghanistan on Sunday. In his first major public pronouncement since taking command in early July, Petraeus urged American troops and the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force to learn and adapt to the culture of Afghanistan while battling the Taliban insurgents and their allies.

"The decisive terrain is the human terrain," Petraeus wrote. "The people are the center of gravity. Only by providing them security and earning their trust and confidence can the Afghan government and ISAF prevail."

Petraeus led the 2007-2008 campaign to stabilize Iraq after years of insurgent and sectarian warfare following the U.S. invasion of 2003. Some of the steps he took there - ordering troops to work in closely with local allies in outposts close to the people, patrol on foot and without sunglasses and cultivate ties with the local population - are included in Sunday's four-page order.

"Earn the people's trust, talk to them, ask them questions and learn about their lives," he wrote. Coalition troops should be "a good guest," learn the local history and "make sure you have the full story."

"Don't be a pawn in someone else's game," he wrote. "Spend time, listen, consult and drink lots of tea."

Full story


Filed under: Afghanistan • David Petraeus • issues
August 1st, 2010
03:52 PM ET
4 years ago

Cheney out of intensive care after heart surgery last month

Washington (CNN) - Former Vice President Dick Cheney remains hospitalized after heart surgery last month but is out of the intensive care unit and could return home this week, his daughter said Sunday.

Liz Cheney said on "Fox News Sunday" that her father planned to resume fly-fishing and hunting after the operation more than three weeks ago in which doctors implanted a small pump in his heart.

Full story


Filed under: Dick Cheney
August 1st, 2010
03:13 PM ET
4 years ago

Planned U.S. draw-down from Afghanistan a sensitive issue


Washington (CNN) - Less than a year from the scheduled start of withdrawing some troops from Afghanistan, opinions remain varied about exactly what will happen when the transition begins at the end of June 2011.

The Obama administration has made clear some troops - no one can say how many - will start withdrawing by next July from stable areas where Afghan forces can provide security.

However, questions over how to measure success and whether the almost 9-year-old war is worth the continuing U.S. investment in lives and resources are gaining prominence as congressional mid-term elections approach in November.

In interviews with military and political leaders broadcast Sunday, scenarios presented on what happens next year ranged from guarded optimism to serious concern. While most views followed expected party talking points, all appeared grounded in the common belief that success is vital even as they differed on what it would be.

On CNN's "State of the Union," Democratic Sen. Carl Levin of Michigan defended the planned troop draw-down next year as a necessary part of strategy.

Full story


Filed under: Afghanistan • Carl Levin • issues • John Kerry • Lindsey Graham • State of the Union
August 1st, 2010
03:01 PM ET
4 years ago

State of the Union: Candy Crowley's Crib Sheet for August 1

In her Crib Sheet, CNN's Candy Crowley wraps the news from Sunday's political talk shows.
In her Crib Sheet, CNN's Candy Crowley wraps the news from Sunday's political talk shows.

Message: What we have here is a failure to communicate…

About July 2011:

To review the bidding, last week Vice President Joe Biden figured aloud that the planned withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan expected next summer could begin with a drawdown as small as a few thousand or so (out of an approximate 100,000).

Today, Defense Secretary Robert Gates (on the debut of “This Week with Christiane Amanpour”) synced up with the Veep predicting “fairly limited” withdrawals in the beginning stages.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi says she understands we’re not getting out in a day, but the woman who saw 102 of her democrats vote against funding for Iraq and Afghanistan knows a trend when she sees it. The American people, she says pointedly, “expect” a withdrawal of more than a few thousand troops.

Honesty Awards

Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Carl Levin (D-Michigan) says it’s “impossible to determine” what the pace of withdrawal will be. BTW, Levin is remarkably positive about progress on the ground.

Outlier

Senator Lindsay Graham (R-South Carolina) says he can see a circumstance under which MORE U.S. troops are needed “to keep (the Taliban) on the run.” Graham, far less upbeat about the situation than Levin, added that if there’s no progress by December “we’re in trouble.”
FULL POST


Filed under: Afghanistan • issues • Popular Posts • State of the Union
August 1st, 2010
12:15 PM ET
August 1st, 2010
12:12 PM ET
4 years ago

Gates: Posting classified war documents was morally wrong

Defense Secretary Gates, left, and Adm. Mullen, right, both spoke out Sunday about the recent disclosure of classified military documents by Wikileaks.
Defense Secretary Gates, left, and Adm. Mullen, right, both spoke out Sunday about the recent disclosure of classified military documents by Wikileaks.

Washington (CNN) - It is up to the Justice Department to determine if there will be criminal charges in the release of classified military documents by WikiLeaks, but Defense Secretary Robert Gates said Sunday the website is morally guilty for putting lives at risk.

On the ABC program "This Week," Gates declared himself "mortified" and "appalled" over the public dissemination of 76,000 documents that detailed military operations in Afghanistan.

"If I'm angry it is because I believe this information puts those in Afghanistan who have helped us at risk," Gates said, citing a Taliban statement that it would seek out informants and other collaborators exposed by the documents.

He said the issue involved two areas of culpability – legal and moral.

While the Department of Justice will decide on the legal questions, "there's also a moral culpability, and that's where I think WikiLeaks is guilty," Gates said.

Adm. Mike Mullen, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, also cited the Taliban's threat to sources named in the leaked documents, saying the United States had a "moral obligation" to protect their safety.

Full story


Filed under: Afghanistan • issues • Mike Mullen • Robert Gates
August 1st, 2010
12:10 PM ET
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