Lawmakers promote revised 'stolen valor' law
July 10th, 2012
05:33 PM ET
2 years ago

Lawmakers promote revised 'stolen valor' law

Washington (CNN) – Capitol Hill lawmakers made a fresh push Tuesday to gain passage of a law that punishes those who lie about earning high military honors.

The Supreme Court ruled June 28 that the Stolen Valor Act of 2006 was unconstitutional, saying it violated the free speech rights of those making false claims about winning the Medal of Honor and other combat citations.

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Filed under: Military • Scott Brown
soundoff (9 Responses)
  1. Sniffit

    So let's make sure we all understand:

    Unlimited free speech for non-living, non-breathing, non-suffering, non-reproducing, non-family-having, technically immortal corporations? GOOD.

    Free speech for pathetic losers who need attention so they make up a story about receiving some high military honor to make themselves feel better and in hopes that people will like them? BAD.

    Guess who the Founding Fathers cited as the "person" whose speech needed the most protection.

    July 10, 2012 06:03 pm at 6:03 pm |
  2. Larry L

    As a long-career veteran with a chest full of medals I'm disgusted by anybody who would lie about their rank, military experience, or honors for service. Still, as I see a low percentage of Americans serving in the military I must wonder about the Congress' true appreciation for veterans. Talk is cheap and I wonder if our Congress, many of them "chicken-hawks" ready to start wars at a moment's notice, only make this gesture for political theater or to salve their conscience... This is not what they need to fix – technology will ultimately solve the problem. They need to start taking care of the people – and not just the rich. They need to work together and produce a compromised, practical product – not more political crap designed to help them get elected. If they want to prove their loyalty to Service Members they need to remember we are mostly working people and not the billionaires funding their campaigns. Go to work and do what's honorable. Don't make us decide to throw you out – you may not like the process.

    July 10, 2012 06:40 pm at 6:40 pm |
  3. MWM

    Part of my military oath was "support and defend the constitution". The first amendment is still a part of that constitution. I may not agree with all of the speech protected by that amendment but I still believe that freedom of speech must be protected.

    July 10, 2012 06:40 pm at 6:40 pm |
  4. Thomas

    It's about time !

    July 10, 2012 07:59 pm at 7:59 pm |
  5. Colorado for ROMNEY

    What about imposter steals presidency laws?

    July 10, 2012 08:31 pm at 8:31 pm |
  6. Name JR

    Well then the commander in chief is safe. That was a close one.

    July 10, 2012 09:17 pm at 9:17 pm |
  7. S.B. Stein E.B. NJ

    Despite never serving in the military, I think that this is a good idea. Someone should never claim to be a member of the US military (with honors) when they never served. Anyone who did deserves to be caught and public embarressed. Those honors are earned.

    July 10, 2012 10:32 pm at 10:32 pm |
  8. Romy Monteyro

    This is good news for our brave men and women in the military and for all veterans. The SC was wrong, very wrong, in it's decision re the Stolen Valor Act. But I'm not surprised because the SC also ruled that desecrating the U.S. flag is an act of free speech! Only in America is a so-called president tolerated for saluting the national flag with his crotch! One day all these insanities will end!

    July 11, 2012 01:26 am at 1:26 am |
  9. J.V.Hodgson

    I like the idea of an accessible pentagon created database as that seems the best fix to this horrible justification for a liar as freedom of speech. People unjustly claiming the Medal of honor or any other military medal should at least be fined. You want to do it in speech or in writing and you do not have it a fine seems appropriate. You take that risk if you are caugh,t in what for me amounts almost to the serious crime of perjury.
    Regards,
    Hodgson.

    July 11, 2012 04:16 am at 4:16 am |