Romney calls for a change in hearts, not gun laws
July 25th, 2012
05:30 PM ET
2 years ago

Romney calls for a change in hearts, not gun laws

(CNN) – Mitt Romney on Wednesday reiterated his position that new gun laws are unnecessary in the wake of the Colorado movie theater massacre that left 12 dead and dozens wounded last week.

"Well this person shouldn't have had any kind of weapons and bombs and other devices and it was illegal for him to have many of those things already," Romney said in an interview with NBC News. "But he had them. And so we can sometimes hope that just changing the law will make all bad things go away. It won't."

CNN's Piers Morgan sits down with Mitt and Ann Romney Thursday in London. Watch "Piers Morgan Tonight" at 9 p.m. ET for their interview.


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Police in Colorado say the suspect in last Friday's massacre set off two gas-emitting devices before spraying the theater in Aurora, Colorado, with bullets from an AR-15 rifle, a 12-gauge shotgun and at least one of two .40-caliber handguns that police recovered.

The alleged killer had bought the guns legally at stores in the Denver area over the past two months, Aurora Police Chief Daniel Oates said. More than 6,000 rounds of ammunition were also purchased online, according to the police chief.

The suspect also booby-trapped his Aurora apartment with more than 30 homemade grenades and 10 gallons of gasoline, a law enforcement official who viewed video showing the apartment's interior has told CNN.

Romney spokesman Ryan Williams said Wednesday the candidate was referring to those improvised devices, and not the legally purchased guns, in the NBC News interview.

Romney argued the more "essential" task at hand involves tackling individual mindsets, rather than gun legislation.

"Changing the heart of the American people may well be what's essential, to improve the lots of the American people," he said.

The presumptive Republican nominee emphasized that amending laws can only go so far in avoiding tragedies like the one in Aurora, Colorado. "A lot of what this young man did was clearly against the law, but the fact that it was against the law did not prevent it from happening," he said.

He later added: “I don’t know that I’m going be able to find a way to prevent people who want to provide harm from being able to purchase things that can carry out that harm. What I want to do is find the people that represent a danger to America and find them and keep them from having the capacity to use or buy things that can harm or hurt other people.”

The interview on Wednesday took place in London, where Romney starts an overseas trip that takes him to the Olympic Games opening ceremony on Friday, then to Israel and Poland.

After last week's shooting, the former Massachusetts governor first articulated his position on gun control on Monday, telling CNBC that the challenge is not the laws, but "the people."

"I still believe that the Second Amendment is the right course to preserve and defend and don't believe that new laws are going to make a difference in this type of tragedy," he said Monday.

As governor of Massachusetts, Romney signed a 2004 extension of a ban on assault weapons, at the time saying "These guns are not made for recreation or self-defense. They are instruments of destruction with the sole purpose of hunting down and killing people."

Also as governor, Romney enacted a statewide "Right to Bear Arms Day," which is held on May 7 to "honor law-abiding citizens and their right to 'use firearms in defense of their families, persons, and property for all lawful purposes, including common defense'," according to his campaign website.

In 2006, ahead of his bid for the 2008 Republican nomination, he became a lifelong member of the NRA.

Asked Monday about the assault weapons ban, Romney said the legislation came as a bipartisan effort from both those who "were for additional gun rights and those that opposed gun rights."

"The idea of one party jamming through something over the objection of the other tends to divide the nation, not make us a more safe and prosperous place," he said. "So if there's common ground, why I'm always willing to have that kind of a conversation."

– CNN's Kevin Liptak and Kevin Bohn contributed to this story.


Filed under: 2012 • Mitt Romney
soundoff (254 Responses)
  1. Donkey Party

    pogojo @ 1:20am – First, the "AR" in AR-15 stands for "assault rifle", so unless you call hunting "assaulting", that weapon serves no useful purpose other than what it's name implies. Second, the .223 round is a NATO-spec round, and is in use by numerous militaries around the globe. Obviously it is a lethal round, so don't try and diminish it's lethality by calling it a small round.

    July 26, 2012 09:22 am at 9:22 am |
  2. Seth Ginzburg

    A nation controlled by Sheldon Adelson and the NRA presents a dark, bleak future. Romney is more dangerous than any foreign terrorist to our country.

    July 26, 2012 09:25 am at 9:25 am |
  3. GI Joe

    Oh Good Gawd. How out of touch with realty is he? He should just put his Chinese contributions in the Caymen Islands and go off and retire. Sick of his prissy walk and lying hand over fist.

    July 26, 2012 09:41 am at 9:41 am |
  4. Lynda/Minnesota

    "What I want to do is find the people that represent a danger to America and find them and keep them from having the capacity to use or buy things that can harm or hurt other people.”

    I see that a whole lot of "blah, blah, blah" went into Romney's answer. Just curious, though. How exactly will Mitt know who the people are who ... in his words ... represent a danger to America and are needing to be "found"? Is there some sort of litmus test he's suggesting? You know, a type of "Danger, Danger" test that all Americans will be required to take once a year? And then do what with those who test ... per Mitt Romney ... as "Danger, Danger" qualified?

    July 26, 2012 09:41 am at 9:41 am |
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