Colorado Poll: Pot getting more support, but majority say it's harmful to state's image
February 10th, 2014
10:49 AM ET
5 months ago

Colorado Poll: Pot getting more support, but majority say it's harmful to state's image

(CNN) - Slightly more Colorado voters support the state's new recreational marijuana law now than six months ago, according to a new Quinnipiac University survey.

The new poll also indicates that a slim majority consider the law as harmful to the state's image.

Ticking upwards in support

Fifty-eight percent of voters support the legalization of pot, up from 54% in August, the poll shows. The selling of marijuana became legal on January 1.

The four percentage point margin falls within the survey's sampling error.

Breaking the numbers down by demographics, 39% of Republicans support the new law, while 76% of Democrats and 55% of independents favor it.

The law is much more popular among those in the 18-29 age bloc, with 78% in support. The number drops as the age gets older. Only 33% of those 65 or older support the law.

Clouding the state's image?

While support seems to be trending upwards, a majority of Colorado voters, 51%, say the new law is bad for the state's image, compared to 38% who disagree and 10% who are unsure or don't have an opinion.

Another bare majority, 51%, say they have tried marijuana previously, but only 10% say they have used marijuana since it became legal last month.

Current law allows Coloradans to grow up to a dozen marijuana plants in their homes. More than seven in 10 say they wouldn't be bothered if one of their neighbors was growing marijuana.

Only 17% say it is very or somewhat likely they would try marijuana brownies at a gathering. Eighty-one percent would be somewhat or very uncomfortable riding in a car with a driver who's had moderate amounts of marijuana

Quinnipiac interviewed 1,139 registered voters in Colorado by telephone from January 29 to February 2. The overall sampling error is plus or minus 2.9 percentage points.

CNN's Ashley Killough contributed to this report.


Filed under: Colorado • Marijuana • Polls
soundoff (39 Responses)
  1. Tampa Tim

    After their awesome season, Marijuana is a good way for Coloradans to forget the Broncos performance in the Super Bowl.

    February 10, 2014 10:55 am at 10:55 am |
  2. Rudy NYC

    Here's a radical thought. Instead of asking Colorodans whether or not the new marijuana law is harmful to the state image, how about asking people outside of Colorado what they think of Colorado and its' new marijuana law.

    February 10, 2014 10:58 am at 10:58 am |
  3. smith

    Legalize it and tax growers, sellers, and buyers. Maybe the tax money could be used to chip away the debt or used for public servants.

    February 10, 2014 11:07 am at 11:07 am |
  4. Rick McDaniel

    It is already creating a whole new set of problems.......and that will continue to worsen.

    Now, pot shops have become the targets of criminals, the DUI incidence will rise sharply, the performance of students will fall, and so-on.

    The rest of the country needs to keep a critical eye on the problems that develop, and recognize the truth.........legal drugs are problematic, in alarming new ways.

    February 10, 2014 11:08 am at 11:08 am |
  5. Dutch/Bad Newz, VA -aka- Where's Our $24 Billion?

    I think the more important poll to keep an eye on is the decline in arrest for simple possession of marijuana.

    February 10, 2014 11:09 am at 11:09 am |
  6. Tony in Maine

    Actually, I think it improves the state's image after their pro wild west gun crowd made them look foolish.

    People are going to use pot just as people are going to drink. Both have consequences – some not good. Prohibition didn't stop drinking, and laws against pot only fill jails with othewise innocent people. Accept that, tax and regulate to make a few bucks for the state and keep it out of the hands of middle schoolers as much as that's possible.

    The right wingnuts need to go back to trying to outlaw women and prevent gays from voting or whatever it is that gets them in a lather.

    February 10, 2014 11:17 am at 11:17 am |
  7. Rudy NYC

    Rick McDaniel wrote:

    It is already creating a whole new set of problems.......and that will continue to worsen.
    -----------------------------------
    Rick's right. The new law will nodoubt create jobs in a fledgling industry, and the job numbers will only continue to grow.

    February 10, 2014 11:19 am at 11:19 am |
  8. The Real Tom Paine

    When you get right down to it, what is the difference between growing your own pot and brewing your own beer? Both can be abused, but its not as though we lack knowledge of the effects, so lets be prepared to treat this a public health problem, and let the law get involved when appropriate, and treat excessive pot smoking as a DUI.

    February 10, 2014 11:28 am at 11:28 am |
  9. Silence DoGood

    @Rick McDaniel
    It is already creating a whole new set of problems.......and that will continue to worsen.

    Now, pot shops have become the targets of criminals, the DUI incidence will rise sharply, the performance of students will fall, and so-on.

    The rest of the country needs to keep a critical eye on the problems that develop, and recognize the truth.........legal drugs are problematic, in alarming new ways.
    -----------
    Freedom is a scary thing Rick. But it is kinda the country you live in!
    We don't another Carrie Nation.

    February 10, 2014 11:34 am at 11:34 am |
  10. Fair is Fair

    I'm OK with legalization. What I'd like to know is how employers, including government, are going to be able to enforce workplace drug testing for something that's legal to use.

    February 10, 2014 11:37 am at 11:37 am |
  11. Wake up People!

    Of course it's going to project a bad image when people keep putting it in the same category as heroin and cocaine. People are constantly calling it a gateway drug, when nothing is farther from the truth. Those that want to do harder narcotics do. And they do it because they want to, truth be told, they want a dfferent high. Then there are those of us that like that laid back feeling weed gives you, we like the fact that if we're depressed, we don't have to take those killer legal drugs. So yes I enjoy a toke, and have for years and I have NEVER had a desire to try ANY other drug. Unless you count Tequila....

    February 10, 2014 11:44 am at 11:44 am |
  12. so-disappointed-Co

    I used to love Colorado! Rocky Mountain High..... such a clean crisp place. Now all I can think of is Rocky Mountain they all get High. Dont think I would consider visiting now. I used to think of it as the ideal vacation spot. Gorgeous mountains, wonderful tout streams, etc. Now I would simply worry about all the dopeheads that have, or soon will have, moved into that, used to be, wonderful state. I no longer think of it as a "clean, crisp" state.

    February 10, 2014 11:49 am at 11:49 am |
  13. Wake up People!

    Now that's what I'm wondering Fair......

    But that's a catch 22, how are they going to get their quota of "thugs" in jail if it's decriminalized?

    February 10, 2014 11:49 am at 11:49 am |
  14. Rudy NYC

    Fair is Fair

    I'm OK with legalization. What I'd like to know is how employers, including government, are going to be able to enforce workplace drug testing for something that's legal to use.
    ---------------------------
    They'll probably approach it the same way it has been done with alcohol for decades. What's so different about it?

    February 10, 2014 11:51 am at 11:51 am |
  15. ThinkAgain - If you want Congress to actually do something FOR the American people, vote OUT the repub/tea bag majority

    @Rudy NYC: "Here's a radical thought. Instead of asking Colorodans whether or not the new marijuana law is harmful to the state image, how about asking people outside of Colorado what they think of Colorado and its' new marijuana law."

    Sorry, doing something that reasonable won't stir up enough controversy for CNN ...

    February 10, 2014 11:52 am at 11:52 am |
  16. Craig

    @ Rick McDaniel

    It is already creating a whole new set of problems.......and that will continue to worsen....

    ******

    I don't understand why people like you insist on lying about what's happening in Colorado.

    Yes, some dispensaries have been targeted for theft, but it isn't on the level you proclaim.

    The fact is, overall crime is down in Colorado since MMJ came to be. There has been no significant rise in DUI incidents due to marijuana, and as for student grades, that too remains to be seen.

    I'm sick of hearing this old-timer, front porch common sense that has nothing to do with reality and everything to do with the speaker's ignorance and prejudice.

    What you really want to do is continue to link bad things to people who smoke pot, and that has to stop.

    February 10, 2014 11:54 am at 11:54 am |
  17. ThinkAgain - If you want Congress to actually do something FOR the American people, vote OUT the repub/tea bag majority

    Impaired is impaired. A breathalyzer that can also detect pot, cocaine and heroine became available last year; law enforcement and select employers (such as trucking companies) can use that to enforce workplace sobriety rules.

    That said, I'm not completely comfortable with pot being legalized, in part because it stays in your system longer that other intoxicants and because pot these days is laced with Lord knows what. Unless you grow it yourself, there's always the danger of ingesting something that could seriously harm or kill you.

    February 10, 2014 11:57 am at 11:57 am |
  18. Silence DoGood

    @Fair is Fair
    I'm OK with legalization. What I'd like to know is how employers, including government, are going to be able to enforce workplace drug testing for something that's legal to use.
    --------------
    Private companies can prohibit it. Most companies prohibit drinking alcohol on the job and that is legal.
    I think employees agree to whatever the drug policy is. They are free to not work there. This is no different from what it was before.

    February 10, 2014 11:58 am at 11:58 am |
  19. Craig

    @ThinkAgain –

    "That said, I'm not completely comfortable with pot being legalized, in part because it stays in your system longer that other intoxicants and because pot these days is laced with Lord knows what. Unless you grow it yourself, there's always the danger of ingesting something that could seriously harm or kill you."

    *****

    Another incredibly ignorant statement.

    The likelihood of cannabis being laced with foreign ingredients is far higher when the product is illegal.

    Colorado has a "seed to sale" tracking policy and the chances of the product being adulterated is infinitesimal.

    February 10, 2014 12:08 pm at 12:08 pm |
  20. just saying

    Tampa Tim
    After their awesome season, Marijuana is a good way for Coloradans to forget the Broncos performance in the Super Bowl
    --

    and that they voted for obama....

    February 10, 2014 12:15 pm at 12:15 pm |
  21. Asshats

    @Rick McDaniel

    You need to lighten up bro. What is REALLY hurting you here with the legalization of it? Just because its legal you think more DUIs will occur and students grads will fall, HAA!? People have been using it legal or not for hundreds of years. Nothing is going to change from legality except maybe a more regulated and responsible way of using it. People like you have been brainwashed into believing it will be the downfall of society, you are clearly misguided and uninformed.

    February 10, 2014 12:15 pm at 12:15 pm |
  22. Thomas

    The Going Green of America .

    Tax it like alcohol .

    February 10, 2014 12:16 pm at 12:16 pm |
  23. Fair is Fair

    Rudy NYC

    Fair is Fair

    I'm OK with legalization. What I'd like to know is how employers, including government, are going to be able to enforce workplace drug testing for something that's legal to use.
    ---------
    They'll probably approach it the same way it has been done with alcohol for decades. What's so different about it?
    -------
    The difference is that it can be traced in your body for maybe up to 30 days. If you smoke some pot on a Friday evening, it won't have an effect on your job performance on Monday morniing. No one is saying it's OK to use while on the job... current workplace testing for marijuana is indiscriminate, though.

    February 10, 2014 12:18 pm at 12:18 pm |
  24. Tony D

    smith
    Legalize it and tax growers, sellers, and buyers. Maybe the tax money could be used to chip away the debt or used for public servants.
    -–

    Or all of the additional drug treatment programs that will be needed, or to pay for the victims of stoned drivers, of victims of drug crime, or enforcement to keep it out of the hands of kids. Let' not pretend that there are no down sides to legalization. People that think this is going to be some tax windfall that cure all ills are delusional.

    February 10, 2014 12:19 pm at 12:19 pm |
  25. Tony D

    Rudy NYC

    Rick McDaniel wrote:

    It is already creating a whole new set of problems.......and that will continue to worsen.
    -----------–
    Rick's right. The new law will nodoubt create jobs in a fledgling industry, and the job numbers will only continue to grow.
    --

    Like drug counselors and addiction treatment centers? Or is Obamacare aka the taxpayers going to pay for all the bad sides of this stupidiy?

    February 10, 2014 12:22 pm at 12:22 pm |
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