November 11th, 2010
06:50 PM ET
4 years ago

Breaking down exit polls

(CNN) - This election will definitely go down in history, and not just because the Republicans re-gained control of the House and will have at least a 60 vote margin. An in-depth analysis of the exit polls tells us for the first time since exit polling began more women voted for Republican congressional candidates than Democratic ones. This election also saw the greatest number of self-identified conservatives voting since exit polling began. CNN national political correspondent Jessica Yellin broke down the numbers: who voted, who didn't and what trends we saw.

November 4th, 2010
02:35 PM ET
4 years ago

Exit Polls: Republicans set record numbers

Washington (CNN) – The 2010 midterm elections rocked President Obama and the Democrats' majority in the House of Representatives, but they also shook the electorate in a historic way. Exit polls conducted by CNN reveal big changes for traditional Democratic voters that may signal a shift unlike any we've seen before.

This November, less than half of women voters selected Democrats for Congress, 49 percent, and 48 percent broke for Republicans. This ties 2002 as the lowest ever female vote for Democrats. Conversely, the male vote for Republicans was the highest ever. Fifty-six percent of men voted for Republican candidates, setting another record for the GOP. Forty-two percent of men voted for Democrats.
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Filed under: 2010 • 2010 Election Exit Polls
November 3rd, 2010
02:21 AM ET
4 years ago

Exit Polls: Enough about the campaign – let’s talk about the campaign

(CNN) - It’s after midnight, which means the 2010 vote is over…and the 2012 race is officially underway.

In exit polls Tuesday, Republicans in three key early-voting states were asked about four of their leading presidential contenders.
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Filed under: 2010 Election Exit Polls • 2012
November 2nd, 2010
11:56 PM ET
4 years ago

Exit Polls: inside the Pennsylvania polls

(CNN) - As the Democrats’ magic number for Senate control stands at 1 (for now), it looks like Pennsylvania’s independents – a quarter of the vote – are breaking for Pat Toomey. But Joe Sestak’s still holding on to a narrow lead. On the other hand: The 27 percent of the state’s voters who decided in the past week are going for Sestak, 58-42 percent.

(here’s a Senate stat that so far defies simple explanation: the 13 percent of Nevada voters who apparently don’t think Sharron Angle is conservative enough. A majority of whom, according to the exit poll, voted for Reid?)

November 2nd, 2010
10:51 PM ET
4 years ago

Exit Polls: Reading the Tea leaves

(CNN) – How much credit should the Tea Party take for tonight’s GOP win? Exit polls paint a mixed picture.

Forty-five percent of independent voters expressed support for the movement, which is 2 for 3 in Senate races so far tonight. The older you are, the polls suggest, the more likely you are to back the Tea Party – and tonight was a senior moment. Forty-seven percent of those 60 and older back the Tea Party; the number for 18-29-year-olds was more than 20 points lower.
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November 2nd, 2010
10:08 PM ET
4 years ago

Exit Polls: Seniors break for the GOP

(CNN) – Midterm voters tend to be older than voters in general. But this year’s midterm voters aren’t just older than the voters who show up when the White House is up for grabs. They’re older than your typical midterm voter, period.

Seniors haven’t made up this big a share of voters since 1994. Twenty-four percent of those who cast ballots this year were over the age of 65 – and their support for Democrats has plummeted. Back in ’94, 48 percent of voters over age 65 backed Democratic candidates. In 2006 and ’08, 49 percent supported the party. This year, that number sank to 39 percent.
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November 2nd, 2010
09:33 PM ET
4 years ago

Exit Polls: More on how the House was won

(CNN) - Numbers are still coming in, but: the exit polls in the system right now show independents backed the GOP by a good 15 points this year.

Anger may have grabbed most of the attention so far this cycle, but anxiety's the star tonight: More than half those who voted today say they're "very worried" about the economy. Another 46 percent are worried, or somewhat worried. (Believe it or not: 3 percent say they aren't worried at all.)
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November 2nd, 2010
08:46 PM ET
4 years ago

Exit Polls: the race so far

(CNN) - The good news for Democrats so far: Things aren’t quite as awful as they could be, according to early exit polls. The bad news: That’s still pretty bad.

The short version: it’s all about who’s showing up today…and who isn’t. Two-thirds of Hispanic voters, 6 in 10 young voters and the overwhelming share of black voters are backing Democrats. There just aren’t as many of them as there were last cycle: The percentage of youth voters dropped by half in early exit polls, from 18 to 9. The black vote has edged down to 10 percent.
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November 2nd, 2010
08:27 PM ET
4 years ago

Exit Polls: behind the numbers in Connecticut

(CNN) - The gender gap hit Linda McMahon hard in Connecticut: according to early exit polls, the Senate contender trails 60 to 39 percent....among women.

Side note: the controversy over Dick Blumenthal's misstatements about his Vietnam-era service don't seem to have made a big impression on the state's voters: by 62 to 36 percent, they say he's honest and trustworthy.

November 2nd, 2010
08:13 PM ET
4 years ago

Exit Polls: Rubio lays claim to independents

(CNN) - Charlie Crist and Kendrick Meek battled each other for independent voters in Florida's Senate race. Rubio won the war.

The Republican cleaned up with that group, according to early exit polls, capturing 48 percent of independents in the three-way race.
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Filed under: 2010 Election Exit Polls • Florida • Marco Rubio
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