May 17th, 2014
05:01 PM ET
7 months ago

Bush family mourns pooch Miss Beazley

(CNN) - Former President George W. Bush and his wife Laura are mourning the death of White House pet Miss Beazley.

“This weekend our beloved dog, Miss Beazley, was put to rest after a battle with lymphoma. She was a source of joy during our time in Washington and in Dallas," Bush said in a statement Saturday.

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Filed under: Bush administration
Bush officials: Good job Obama but...
May 3rd, 2011
02:13 PM ET
4 years ago

Bush officials: Good job Obama but...

Washington (CNN) – Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld applauded the successful mission to kill Osama bin Laden under the Obama administration, but also highlighted the pivotal role their team played in the search for America's most wanted terrorist.

"It was also important that President Bush put in place counterterrorism strategies and policies, efforts that the military and intelligence have been making over the years," Rice told CNN's "American Morning" on Tuesday. "To work together better to achieve that kind of level of integration didn't happen yesterday. This is something that has been happening for quite a long time."
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August 12th, 2010
08:52 AM ET
4 years ago

A surprise tax cut for the (almost) rich

New York (CNNMoney.com) – Worried about your taxes going up next year? They might for some high earners. But some not-quite-rich taxpayers could end up with a surprise tax cut.

If the Bush tax cuts expire for the nation's top earners, people making a pinch less than the wealthiest Americans, who don't quite qualify for the new top two tax brackets, could find themselves in an even lower bracket next year.

"We should end up with a sweet spot in the middle of the higher income brackets," said Robert Kerr, senior director of government relations at the National Association of Enrolled Agents. "This is an unintended benefit of the new plan that many people don't realize."

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Filed under: Bush administration • issues • Obama administration • Taxes
February 1st, 2010
10:16 AM ET
5 years ago

McConnell: Bush was mistaken to try terrorists in civilian court

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell took issue Sunday with many of the Obama administration's policies relating to treatment of alleged terrorists.
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell took issue Sunday with many of the Obama administration's policies relating to treatment of alleged terrorists.

Washington (CNN) – The leading Republican in the Senate said Sunday that the previous Republican administration had been mistaken in ever trying alleged terrorists in civilian federal courts.

“The only time [the Obama] administration ever cites the previous administration for a precedent is to mention that there were some terrorists tried in U.S. courts,” Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, said Sunday on State of the Union.

“We now know that was a mistake,” declared McConnell. “That was a mistake by the previous administration. The other mistake they made that shouldn’t be replicated by this administration is letting too many people go from Guantanamo.”

Instead of giving alleged terrorists civilian trials in federal court, McConnell said the administration should use the system of military commissions set up by Congress “for the specific purpose of trying foreigners captured on the battlefield.”

“They ought to be tried in these military commissions. They also ought to be detained at Guantanamo,” the Senate Minority Leader said.
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January 31st, 2010
06:56 PM ET
5 years ago

McConnell: Bush was mistaken to try terrorists in civilian court

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell took issue Sunday with many of the Obama administration's policies relating to treatment of alleged terrorists.
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell took issue Sunday with many of the Obama administration's policies relating to treatment of alleged terrorists.

Washington (CNN) – The leading Republican in the Senate said Sunday that the previous Republican administration had been mistaken in ever trying alleged terrorists in civilian federal courts.

“The only time [the Obama] administration ever cites the previous administration for a precedent is to mention that there were some terrorists tried in U.S. courts,” Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, said Sunday on State of the Union.

“We now know that was a mistake,” declared McConnell. “That was a mistake by the previous administration. The other mistake they made that shouldn’t be replicated by this administration is letting too many people go from Guantanamo.”

Instead of giving alleged terrorists civilian trials in federal court, McConnell said the administration should use the system of military commissions set up by Congress “for the specific purpose of trying foreigners captured on the battlefield.”

“They ought to be tried in these military commissions. They also ought to be detained at Guantanamo,” the Senate Minority Leader said.
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January 8th, 2010
05:16 AM ET
5 years ago

Former George W. Bush attorney arrested

A former attorney to President George W. Bush was arrested Wednesday at his Connecticut home and accused of trying to kill his wife, according to local police.
A former attorney to President George W. Bush was arrested Wednesday at his Connecticut home and accused of trying to kill his wife, according to local police.

(CNN) - A former attorney to President George W. Bush was arrested Wednesday at his Connecticut home and accused of trying to kill his wife, according to the New Canaan Police Department.

Police said they were responding to a “panic alarm activation” at the home of John Farren, 57, when they were redirected to another house nearby. A resident there had placed a 911 call saying an injured woman was at her home after being “involved in a domestic dispute with her husband” at the couple’s residence. Police said they found the woman “bleeding about her head, face and body.”

Farren was arrested at the couple’s home a short time later, police said. His lawyer had no comment when contacted Thursday by CNN.

Farren was “charged with Criminal Attempt at Murder and Strangulation 1st degree,” according to a police statement. He was arraigned Thursday in Norwalk Superior Court and is being held on a $2 million bond.

Sgt. Carol Ogrinc, a New Canaan Police spokeswoman, confirmed that the 43-year-old woman was Farren’s wife. She “is in stable condition with head and facial injuries,” according to the police statement.

Former colleagues confirm that Farren worked in the Bush administration. An archived press release said that Farren was appointed deputy assistant to the president and deputy counsel to the president in June 2007.

–CNN's Mark Preston and Stephanie Gallman contributed to this report.


Filed under: Bush administration
January 7th, 2010
08:31 PM ET
5 years ago

Former George W. Bush attorney arrested

A former attorney to President George W. Bush was arrested Wednesday at his Connecticut home and accused of trying to kill his wife, according to local police.
A former attorney to President George W. Bush was arrested Wednesday at his Connecticut home and accused of trying to kill his wife, according to local police.

(CNN) - A former attorney to President George W. Bush was arrested Wednesday at his Connecticut home and accused of trying to kill his wife, according to the New Canaan Police Department.

Police said they were responding to a “panic alarm activation” at the home of John Farren, 57, when they were redirected to another house nearby. A resident there had placed a 911 call saying an injured woman was at her home after being “involved in a domestic dispute with her husband” at the couple’s residence. Police said they found the woman “bleeding about her head, face and body.”

Farren was arrested at the couple’s home a short time later, police said. His lawyer had no comment when contacted Thursday by CNN.

Farren was “charged with Criminal Attempt at Murder and Strangulation 1st degree,” according to a police statement. He was arraigned Thursday in Norwalk Superior Court and is being held on a $2 million bond.

Sgt. Carol Ogrinc, a New Canaan Police spokeswoman, confirmed that the 43-year-old woman was Farren’s wife. She “is in stable condition with head and facial injuries,” according to the police statement.

Former colleagues confirm that Farren worked in the Bush administration. An archived press release said that Farren was appointed deputy assistant to the president and deputy counsel to the president in June 2007.

–CNN's Mark Preston and Stephanie Gallman contributed to this report.


Filed under: Bush administration • Extra • Popular Posts
December 14th, 2009
06:24 PM ET
11 months ago

Millions of White House e-mails recovered

ALT TEXT

Computer technicians have recovered about 22 million Bush administration e-mails. (Photo Credit: Getty Images/File)

Washington (CNN) - Computer technicians have recovered about 22 million Bush administration e-mails that the Bush White House had said were missing, two watchdog groups that sued over the documents announced Monday.

The e-mails date from 2003 to 2005, and had been "mislabeled and effectively lost," according to the National Security Archive, a research group based at George Washington University. But Melanie Sloan, executive director of the liberal-leaning Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW), said it could be years before most of the e-mails are made public.

"The e-mails themselves are not what we're getting," Sloan said.

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Filed under: Bush administration • Popular Posts • White House
September 30th, 2009
07:56 PM ET
5 years ago

An expert's view on Afghanistan strategy discussions

Hadley says he believes advisers will help Obama feel 'comfortable making the decision ... only he can make.'
Hadley says he believes advisers will help Obama feel 'comfortable making the decision ... only he can make.'

WASHINGTON (CNN) - A meeting between President Obama and his national security team Wednesday could be a turning point in the war in Afghanistan, says someone who's been in similar meetings.

Stephen Hadley, a former national security adviser in the Bush administration, said the meeting would be a "vigorous debate" in which "views will change ... may be some emerging consensus."

"And one of the purposes of the kind of process that they're going through now is to take people with the range of views, express their views to the president and see in an interactive process," Hadley said.

"Again, the fact that the president is interacting directly with his national security principles and hopefully with his diplomats and military officers in the field, allows for a process in some sense that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts," he said.

But in the end, the decision rests solely with the commander in chief, who Hadley said sets the tone and direction of the negotiations with his advisers. "What we know and what we're told about this president is that he's very deliberate and that he wants to hear from everyone in the room. ... I think they [Obama's advisers] will speak freely ... and it will put him in a position where he feels comfortable making the decision that, really, only he can make."

But the president faces varying opinions from within his administration, including recent reports that his vice president is urging a counterterrorism strategy that would focus on targeting al Qaeda and Taliban forces.

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July 13th, 2009
06:16 PM ET
5 years ago

Bush-era distractions may weigh down Obama's agenda

President Obama is tackling a large domestic agenda at the same time as a new CIA controversy begins to brew.
President Obama is tackling a large domestic agenda at the same time as a new CIA controversy begins to brew.

WASHINGTON (CNN) - As President Obama tries pressing ahead with his domestic agenda focused on health care and energy reform, several potential investigations threaten to steal the focus in Washington.

The most recent controversy: The revelation that Central Intelligence Agency Director Leon Panetta told House and Senate intelligence committees that former Vice President Dick Cheney ordered the spy agency to keep Congress in the dark for eight years about a still-secret counterterrorism program.

The head of the Senate Intelligence Committee, who confirmed she learned of the former vice president's order during a recent closed-door briefing by Panetta, expressed outrage.

"That's something that should never, ever happen again," Sen. Diane Feinstein, D-California, said on Fox News Sunday. "I think this is a problem, obviously."

A knowledgeable source familiar with the matter said the counterterrorism program in question was initiated shortly after the September 11, 2001, attacks on New York and Washington. The program, the source notes, was on-again, off-again and was never fully operational. Panetta has since put an end to the program, according to the source.

Efforts to contact Cheney for reaction were unsuccessful. CIA spokesman Paul Gimigliano has declined to comment on the report.

David Gergen, CNN senior political analyst, says that while this is the last thing the Obama administration wants to deal with, it's "starting to mushroom into a life form of its own."

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