March 4th, 2010
11:20 AM ET
5 years ago

CNN Fact Check: Health sector donations to the political parties

(CNN) - Rep. Anthony Weiner, D-New York, went on the offense while speaking with CNN's Rick Sanchez.

Telling Sanchez to "write this down," Weiner said Republicans do not want the health care overhaul to succeed, in part because "the health care industry is one of their biggest benefactors."

Pressed by Sanchez, Weiner allowed that Democrats also receive money from the health industry but held strong to his initial assertion. CNN Fact Check Desk wondered: Where does the money go?

Fact Check: Which party has received more money from the health care sector?

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Filed under: Fact Check • Health care
February 24th, 2010
07:27 PM ET
5 years ago

CNN Fact Check: Would exemption repeal lower premiums?

(CNN) - By a lopsided vote of 406 to 19, the House of Representatives has voted to repeal a law that protects health insurance companies from federal antitrust prosecution. Backers of repealing the exemption say it would inject new competition into the health insurance industry and reduce premiums, but its prospects of passing the Senate are uncertain.

Fact Check: Would eliminating health insurance companies' antitrust protections cut premiums?

(Get the facts and the bottom line after the jump)

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Filed under: Fact Check • Health care
February 24th, 2010
05:07 PM ET
5 years ago

CNN Fact Check: Sen. Joseph Lieberman - Gay advocate?

The CNN Fact Check Desk takes a look at Sen. Lieberman's record on gay rights legislation.
The CNN Fact Check Desk takes a look at Sen. Lieberman's record on gay rights legislation.

CNN – Sen. Joseph Lieberman, I-Connecticut, announced Monday that he will be the main sponsor of a bill calling for the repeal of the military's controversial "don't ask, don't tell" policy.

The policy requires gay and lesbian service members to stay quiet about their sexual orientation or risk expulsion. Commanding officers are also prohibited from asking subordinates about their orientation. Since the law was passed in 1993, more than 13,000 otherwise qualified service men and women have been discharged.

In a statement on his Web site, Lieberman writes that he would "be proud" to sponsor a bill to allow "patriotic gay Americans to defend our national security." The senator also writes that he has opposed the current policy since its inception in 1993. Lieberman has said the legislation will be introduced next week.

The CNN Fact Check Desk wondered whether Lieberman really has opposed the current policy since its inception. We also wanted to take a look at Lieberman's record on gay rights legislation.

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February 16th, 2010
10:54 AM ET
5 years ago

CNN Fact Check: Open Senate races

(CNN) - On Monday, Sen. Evan Bayh, D-Indiana, announced that he will not seek re-election this year. With Democrats defending five open seats and Republicans with six open seats in the Senate, the CNN Fact Check Desk wondered how this election measures up to the past.

Fact Check: How many open-seat races have there been in the Senate in the recent past?

(Get the facts and the bottom line after the jump)
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Filed under: Evan Bayh • Fact Check • Senate
February 12th, 2010
12:52 PM ET
5 years ago

CNN Fact Check: How transparent is the Senate's hold process?

(CNN) – On Tuesday, CNN confirmed that Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Alabama, had lifted a majority of the holds that he had placed on President Barack Obama's nominations the Friday before. Obama referenced this issue during Tuesday's White House press briefing, stating, "One senator, as you all are aware, had put a hold on every single nominee that we had put forward, due to a dispute over a couple of earmarks in his state."

The president's statement was in direct contrast to a statement by Shelby's office, and the CNN Fact Check Desk wanted to get to the bottom of it.

Read the facts and get the bottom line after the jump:
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Filed under: Fact Check • Senate
February 12th, 2010
08:02 AM ET
5 years ago

CNN Fact Check: Clinton's heart history

(CNN) - Former President Bill Clinton's trip to a New York hospital was his second procedure since open-heart surgery in 2004. The 63-year-old, two-term president was taken to New York Presbyterian Hospital after complaining of what Clinton counselor Douglas Band said was "chest discomfort."

Fact Check: What prior heart issues has Clinton had?

– Clinton had a quadruple bypass in September 2004 after doctors discovered blockages in some of the coronary arteries that feed blood to the heart. Some of those arteries were more than 90 percent blocked, surgeons said after the procedure.
- In March 2005, doctors removed fluid and scar tissue that had developed in his left chest after the bypass surgery.
- Thursday's procedure inserted two stents - tubular pieces of scaffolding that support the artery walls - to one of the former president's coronary arteries.
- Stents are used to open up arteries that have become blocked or narrowed. Dr. Jonathan Reiner, who was former Vice President Dick Cheney's cardiologist, said Clinton's symptoms suggest one of the bypass grafts performed during his open-heart surgery had become blocked - a common problem, Reiner said.
- The average hospital stay for patients having a stent implanted is two days or less, and some patients may not need to stay overnight, according to the National Institutes of Health.

Read the bottom line after the jump:
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Filed under: Bill Clinton • Fact Check
February 4th, 2010
04:29 PM ET
5 years ago

CNN Fact Check: State opposition to health care reform

(CNN) - Lawmakers in many states are trying to make it illegal to mandate that everyone buy health insurance - one of the key parts of the Democrats' health care reform efforts in Washington.

In Kansas, lawmakers filed a resolution this week that aims to alter the state constitution to do so. State Sen. Mary Pilcher Cook, a co-sponsor of the legislation says, "States have a duty to protect their citizens' liberty." Could these proposed amendments affect health care reform in the nation's capital?

Fact Check: Can state governments overrule federal regulations on health care?

(Get the facts and the bottom line after the jump)

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Filed under: Fact Check • Health care
February 4th, 2010
03:40 PM ET
5 years ago

CNN Fact Check: What is the 'odious' proposal in Uganda?

(CNN) - At the annual National Prayer Breakfast in Washington, President Barack Obama spoke out against proposed legislation in Uganda. Issuing a call for common ground, the president blasted the proposal to penalize homosexuality, calling it "odious."

Fact Check: What penalities would homosexuals face under the proposed law in Uganda?

(Get the facts and the bottom line after the jump)
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Filed under: Fact Check
February 4th, 2010
02:27 PM ET
2 years ago

CNN Fact Check: Student loans

(CNN) – President Barack Obama says the federal government is wasting money by paying banks to offer student loans, and wants to cut out what he calls "middlemen" who cost taxpayers billions, and to use the savings to expand other financial aid programs.

"It turns out that right now a lot of the student loan programs are still run through financial institutions and banks. So you got this middleman, and they get billions of dollars per year managing loans that are guaranteed by the federal government," Obama said at a New Hampshire event Tuesday. Obama said those middlemen "are essentially taking no risks, and yet they're still extracting these huge profits."

Read the facts and the bottom line after the jump:
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Filed under: Fact Check • President Obama
February 4th, 2010
01:49 PM ET
5 years ago

CNN Fact Check: Politics driving terror case complaints?

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell asked Holder last week to explain the decision to put AbdulMutallab before a judge rather than a military tribunal.
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell asked Holder last week to explain the decision to put AbdulMutallab before a judge rather than a military tribunal.

(CNN) - Attorney General Eric Holder on Wednesday tried to knock down Republican criticism of how the case of accused "Undiebomber" Umar Farouk AbdulMutallab was handled, pointing out that previous suspects went through civilian courts without GOP objections.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, asked Holder last week to explain the decision to put AbdulMutallab before a judge rather than a military tribunal. In a Sunday appearance on CNN's "State of the Union" and a Wednesday speech to the Heritage Foundation, McConnell called the decision to try suspected terrorists before civilian courts a "mistake."

But in his response to McConnell, Holder told the GOP leader that similar procedures "were not criticized when employed by previous administrations."

"The decision to charge Mr. AbdulMutallab in federal court, and the methods used to interrogate him, are fully consistent with the long-established and publicly known policies and practices of the Department of Justice, the FBI, and the United States government as a whole, as implemented for many years by administrations of both parties," Holder wrote, citing a series of Bush administration decisions to support his argument.

Read the facts and the bottom line after the jump:
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Filed under: Eric Holder • Fact Check
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