March 24th, 2009
03:17 PM ET
5 years ago

Democrats and GOP seek to cash in on Palin

Both parties are trying to use Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin to fundraise.
Both parties are trying to use Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin to fundraise.

WASHINGTON (CNN) - Congressional Democrats and Republicans disagree on just about everything - except for Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin's fundraising potential.

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee asked supporters Tuesday to make a donation to help stop the former vice presidential candidate and her fellow Republicans from blocking President Obama's policy goals.

"The Republicans have called on none other than Sarah Palin to headline their big fat-cat fundraising dinner," James Carville, a Democratic strategist, wrote in a Tuesday e-mail. "You know they're going to use every last dime they raise to try to slam the brakes on President Obama's change agenda."

Carville, a CNN contributor, is referring to the announcement by congressional Republicans that Palin would be headlining a major fundraising dinner in June. But it is not clear if Palin will attend the fundraiser, let alone headline it. A Palin spokesman said the governor did not know about the event, and it appears there was some confusion between her staff in Alaska and political aides in Washington.

While Palin has yet to make a decision on the dinner, an organizer of the fundraiser said that they are still "moving forward as planned."

What's clear is that Republican and Democratic political strategists believe that Palin can be an effective tool to raise money.


Filed under: DCCC • James Carville • Sarah Palin
March 4th, 2009
06:08 PM ET
6 years ago

Carville, Begala deny White House 'conspiracy' on Limbaugh

James Carville said he and Stan Greenberg have polled Limbaugh's name for 'a long time.'
James Carville said he and Stan Greenberg have polled Limbaugh's name for 'a long time.'

WASHINGTON (CNN) – Democratic strategist James Carville avoided saying Wednesday if he had been in contact with the White House over ongoing efforts to portray talk show host Rush Limbaugh as the leader of the Republican Party.

Carville was asked on CNN’s The Situation Room about a report in Politico that said Carville and his longtime friend, CNN contributor Paul Begala, pushed the idea of attacking Limbaugh in their daily conversations with White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel.

Carville said it was Limbaugh who started the war of the words.

“I think that honestly I don’t want to take credit away from the great Rush Limbaugh who did it on January 16 when he said he wanted the president’s policies to fail, and that’s what started the whole thing,” Carville said. “So don’t give Paul and I, or Rahm credit.  Credit is due to the great Rush Limbaugh. So my hat’s off to you, Rush.”

The Politico piece noted that Carville and his partner, pollster Stan Greenberg, began polling Limbaugh’s popularity last year during the presidential campaign.

Carville said he and Greenberg have included Limbaugh in their polls “for a long time,” and said they were working on a new poll to be released soon.

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Filed under: James Carville • Rush Limbaugh
January 2nd, 2009
02:40 PM ET
6 years ago

Carville makes painful prediction for 2009

 Simple math says Democrats are more likely get caught up in a scandal, Carville says.
Simple math says Democrats are more likely get caught up in a scandal, Carville says.

WASHINGTON (CNN) - You know, people will insist that 2008 had 366 days. I don't believe it. I think it had 36,066 days.

It certainly felt much longer than any year that I've ever experienced. Only time will tell what's in store for us in 2009, but first I have a few predictions.

Internationally, I believe there will be a peace agreement between Israel and Syria in the next 18 months. It is something that will be a priority for the incoming Obama administration.

In domestic politics, my first prediction is one that pains me to make, but I'll make it anyway.

The Democratic Party has had a recent run of corruption and sex scandals. Mathematicians say that there are no such things as streaks and that the last event has nothing to do with the next. The only people who disagree are crapshooters and political operatives. Since I am both, I firmly believe that there are streaks and that political scandals happen in clusters.

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Filed under: James Carville • Politics
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