July 23rd, 2010
03:13 PM ET
4 years ago

Clyburn teases Biden, calling him 'clean' and 'articulate'

House Majority Whip James Clyburn poked fun at Vice President Joe Biden during a joint appearance with him Friday.
House Majority Whip James Clyburn poked fun at Vice President Joe Biden during a joint appearance with him Friday.

Washington (CNN) - House Majority Whip James Clyburn had some fun at Joe Biden's expense Friday, needling the Vice President over one of his infamous campaign gaffes.

Clyburn was introducing Biden at the dedication of the Ernest "Fritz" Hollings Special Collections Library at the University of South Carolina, named for the former senator who is a close friend of Biden's.

"Ladies and gentleman, it's a pleasure for me to present to you a mainstream American who is an articulate and bright and clean and a nice looking guy," Clyburn said, barely concealing laughter.

Biden grinned widely and embraced Clyburn as he took the stage.

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Filed under: James Clyburn • Joe Biden
June 14th, 2010
08:02 AM ET
4 years ago

Democrats want investigation into surprise Senate primary winner

(CNN) - As political newcomer Alvin Greene calls on South Carolina's Democratic establishment to get behind him, party leaders are calling for an investigation into his surprise win in the state's Democratic Senate primary.






Greene, 32, is an unemployed veteran who came out of nowhere to win last week's election. Despite running no ads, Greene toppled former state legislator Vic Rawl with almost 60 percent of the vote. He'll face Republican Sen. Jim DeMint in the general election.

South Carolina Rep. James Clyburn said Sunday that he has no plans to get behind Greene and repeated his suspicions that the Democratic nominee is "someone's plant."

"I know a Democratic pattern. I know a Republican pattern, and I saw in the Democratic primary elephant dung all over the place," Clyburn, the majority whip, said on CNN's "State of the Union."

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Filed under: 2010 • James Clyburn • South Carolina
June 13th, 2010
01:00 PM ET
4 years ago

Clyburn: 'Elephant dung' all over S.C. Dem primaries

ALT TEXT

"I saw the patterns in this,' House Majority Whip James Clyburn, D-South Carolina, said Sunday of his state's recent Democratic primaries. (Photo Credit: CNN)

(CNN) – A leading South Carolina Democrat charged Sunday that his state’s recent Democratic primaries had been tainted. And House Majority Whip James Clyburn used some very colorful language to do so.

In addition to the fact that Alvin Greene, an unemployed veteran with no apparent campaign apparatus, won Tuesday’s race for the South Carolina’s Democratic Senate nomination, Clyburn also told CNN of a suspicious element in his own primary race - a consultant with Republican ties worked for Clyburn’s unsuccessful challenger.

Watch: Clyburn speaks out on recent S.C. Dem primaries

“I saw the patterns in this,” Clyburn said on CNN’s State of the Union. “I know a Democratic pattern. I know a Republican pattern and I saw in the Democratic primary elephant dung all over the place. And so I knew something was wrong in that primary. And this result tells us that.”

Clyburn also told CNN Chief Political Correspondent Candy Crowley that he did not see himself supporting Greene in his effort to unseat popular conservative lawmaker Sen. Jim DeMint, R-South Carolina. And Clyburn reiterated his theory that Greene’s candidacy was orchestrated to disrupt the electoral process in South Carolina. “Of course, Candy, I never said [Greene] was a Republican plant,” explained Clyburn. “I said he was someone’s plant.”

Related: Clyburn calls for an investigation into Greene's bid

Speaking to CNN’s Don Lemon in an interview that aired Saturday night, Greene denied that he had been planted in the race by the Republican Party.

(Video of Lemon's interview with Greene embedded after the jump)

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Filed under: 2010 • Alvin Greene • James Clyburn • Popular Posts • South Carolina • State of the Union
June 10th, 2010
03:00 PM ET
4 years ago

Top Dem says S.C. Senate nominee 'should be investigated'

 House Democratic Whip James Clyburn has called for an investigation into Alvin Greene's candidacy.
House Democratic Whip James Clyburn has called for an investigation into Alvin Greene's candidacy.

Washington (CNN)– Majority Whip James Clyburn is calling for an investigation into the source of funds that currently-unemployed Senate Democratic nominee Alvin Greene used to pay his state party's $10,440 filing fee in South Carolina.

During an appearance on the Bill Press radio show, Clyburn said, "Nobody in his or her right mind would believe that an unemployed person would take $10,000 out of his or her pockets to run for the United States Senate. That doesn't add up. Somebody gave him that $10,000 and he who took it should be investigated and he who gave it should be investigated."

On Wednesday Greene told CNN that "I funded my campaign entirely out of my pocket." "I am self-managed and self-funded out of my personal money, everything up to this point." Greene said.

Greene, whose candidacy was almost unknown before Tuesday's Senate primary, paid the fee to the South Carolina State Democratic Party in March.

Kristie Grecko, a spokesman for Clyburn's office said that Clyburn's remarks are based on the fact that "Alvin Greene does not have an income."

Grecko also said that Clyburn has asked the State Democratic Party to reach out to the federal government to investigate the matter.

When asked if there were any investigations pending regarding Greene, William Nettles, US Attorney for South Carolina, told CNN that he "cannot confirm or deny any FEC election investigation."

FEC representative Mary Brandenburg would not comment on Greene's case specifically, but said that that candidates "are not required to file with the FEC until they have passed a $5,000 fundraising and spending threshold."

Clyburn is not the only Democratic leader who is dissatisfied with the explanation behind Greene's surge into politics. South Carolina Democratic Party Chair Carol Fowler called for Greene to withdraw from the nomination on Wednesday, following a media report that Greene is facing felony charges.


Filed under: 2010 • Alvin Greene • James Clyburn • South Carolina
March 22nd, 2010
04:47 PM ET
4 years ago

Clyburn: Texas Republican should apologize to the entire House

House Democratic Whip James Clyburn wants Rep. Randy Neugebauer to apologize to the entire House.
House Democratic Whip James Clyburn wants Rep. Randy Neugebauer to apologize to the entire House.

Washington (CNN) – A leading House Democrat told reporters Monday that Rep. Randy Neugebauer, R-Texas, owes the entire House of Representatives an apology for his outburst during Sunday night's health care reform debate.

Related: I made 'baby killer' comment, Neugebauer says

House Democratic Whip James Clyburn of South Carolina said Neugebauer's apology to Rep. Bart Stupak, D-Michigan, was inadequate. "He needs to go the well. He disrupted the decorum of the House of Representatives…It was wrong," Clyburn said after the health care reform bill's signing ceremony in the Capitol.

But Clyburn's colleague, House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer of Maryland was content to move past the controversy over Neugebauer's comment. "He's apologized. He shouldn't have done it. It was inappropriate. He's apologized. I don't think further action is needed."

Clyburn also slammed Republicans for cheering on a protester who yelled out in the House chamber earlier in the day. The individual was removed from the chamber for disrupting the floor debate by yelling out opposition to the health care reform bill. Republicans on the floor could be heard cheering as the U.S. Capitol Police took the person out.

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Filed under: Abortion • Health care • James Clyburn
March 16th, 2010
11:02 AM ET
4 years ago

Could House approve Senate health care bill without vote?

House Majority Whip James Clyburn said Monday he was ‘very comfortable’ that House Democrats would have the 216 votes necessary to pass the House.
House Majority Whip James Clyburn said Monday he was ‘very comfortable’ that House Democrats would have the 216 votes necessary to pass the House.

Washington (CNN) – Can the House of Representatives pass a health care bill without actually voting on it?

That question - bizarre to most casual political observers - took center stage Tuesday as top House Democrats struggled to find enough support to push President Barack Obama's top legislative priority over the finish line.

The House of Representatives is expected to vote later this week on the roughly $875 billion bill passed by the Senate in December. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-California, needs a bare majority of 216 votes from her 253-member caucus to pass the measure. No Republicans are expected to back it.

Pelosi's problem: A lot of House Democrats don't like the Senate bill. Among other things, some House members have expressed concern that the Senate bill does not include an adequate level of subsidies to help middle- and lower-income families purchase coverage. They also object to the Senate's proposed tax on high-end insurance plans.

Pelosi's solution: Have the House pass the Senate bill, but then immediately follow up with another vote in both chambers of Congress on a package of changes designed in part to make the overall legislation more acceptable to House Democrats.

Now, however, Pelosi may also try to help unhappy House Democrats by allowing them to avoid a direct up or down vote on the Senate bill. The speaker may call for a vote on a rule that would simply "deem" the Senate bill to be passed. The House would then proceed to a separate vote on the more popular changes to the Senate bill.

House GOP leaders will try to block the procedure, a House GOP aide told CNN Tuesday morning. They will try to force a vote on a resolution requiring the Senate health care bill to be brought to an actual up or down vote, the aide said.

Senate Minority Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, called the maneuver Pelosi's "scheme and deem" plan Tuesday morning. He said the maneuver was "jaw-dropping in its audacity."

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Filed under: Health care • James Clyburn • Mitch McConnell • Popular Posts • Senate
March 4th, 2010
06:34 PM ET
4 years ago

House Democrats looking for health care votes

Washington (CNN) - Majority Whip James Clyburn said Thursday that he is waiting for the final pieces of health care reform to fall into place before he is able to definitively say there are enough votes in the House to pass it.

"We don't know exactly what to whip," Clyburn told CNN's Don Lemon in an interview. "That's why we are waiting on these fixers to take place, and the moment we get the fixers done and post them for the American people, I will look in on it the same way the American people will, and then I will know what to go to my caucus with."

House Democrats need 217 votes to pass the health care bill approved by the Senate as well as an additional bill to change some revenue measures. The Senate would then only need to pass the one bill with the revenue changes, which is likely to occur through a process known as reconciliation. Reconciliation only requires 51 votes.

Clyburn said the final product will include ideas from both sides of the aisle.

"Now we are looking to reconcile the Republican's ideas, the president's wishes, with the House and Senate bills, and that's what we are trying to get a simple majority vote on those fixers," Clyburn said.

Turning to 2010 politics, the South Carolina Democrat sharply criticized the Republican National Committee for a fundraising presentation that paints President Obama in an unfavorable light.

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Filed under: Health care • James Clyburn
October 26th, 2009
07:58 PM ET
5 years ago

Reid: Reconciliation 'always an option'

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid told CNN Monday that a budgetary procedure called reconciliation is an option to pass a health care reform bill in his chamber.
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid told CNN Monday that a budgetary procedure called reconciliation is an option to pass a health care reform bill in his chamber.

WASHINGTON (CNN) - After announcing his intention to move forward with a health care reform bill in the Senate that includes a version of the public health insurance option that would allow states to opt out, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid told CNN that he has not ruled out using a budgetary procedure called reconciliation which would allow Democrats to pass the bill with a simple majority.

"It's always an option," Reid told CNN when asked about reconciliation Monday.

Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin, D-Illinois, told CNN he hopes Democrats don't need to go that route and remained open to putting a bill on the Senate floor that does not include a public option, should the Reid-pushed bill fail. A proposal without a public option would still require 60 votes to move forward in the Senate.

In an interview prior to Reid's announcement Monday, House Democratic Whip Jim Clyburn, D-South Carolina, made a public appeal to Reid to use reconciliation.

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Filed under: Dick Durbin • Harry Reid • Health care • James Clyburn • Senate
October 26th, 2009
02:03 PM ET
5 years ago

Clyburn: 60 shouldn't be 'the crucial number' for Senate health bill

Clyburn said Senate Democrats should move forward even if they don't have 60 votes.
Clyburn said Senate Democrats should move forward even if they don't have 60 votes.

WASHINGTON (CNN) - Citing a recent CNN/Opinion Research Corporation poll, House Majority Whip James Clyburn said Monday that the Senate Majority Leader should use a budgetary maneuver to pass health care reform with a government-run insurance option if Democrats do not have the 60 votes necessary to break a filibuster.

According to the survey released last week, 61 percent of Americans favor a public health insurance option that would compete with private plans. Support for the public option rose six point since an earlier poll in August.

"I can't imagine that 60 percent of the United States Senate will deny 61 percent of the American people the opportunity to get what they say they want," Clyburn said Monday in an interview on CNN's Newsroom. "So I would say to Senator [Harry] Reid that 60 ought not be the crucial number. Fifty ought to be the crucial number."

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Filed under: Democrats • Health care • James Clyburn • Popular Posts • Senate
June 26th, 2009
11:38 AM ET
5 years ago

House debates politically contentious energy overhaul bill

WASHINGTON (CNN) – A sharply divided House of Representatives debated passage of a White House-backed climate change bill Friday as Democratic leaders made a final push among members worried about the legislation's potential economic and political fallout.

"We're getting there," House Majority Whip James Clyburn, D-South Carolina, told CNN. "We're on the eight (yard line). First and goal."

The bill would reduce nationwide greenhouse gas emissions 17 percent by 2020 and 83 percent by 2050 through a so-called "cap-and-trade" program under which companies would buy and sell emissions credits.

Among other things, the bill would also require utilities to generate an increasing amount of power from renewable sources.

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Filed under: Environmental policy • James Clyburn
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