Virginia gets a Tea Party challenger
December 29th, 2010
04:13 PM ET
3 years ago

Virginia gets a Tea Party challenger

(CNN) – The 2012 Senate campaign in Virginia has its first Tea Party candidate.

Jamie Radtke, head of the Virginia Tea Party Patriots, filed federal papers to run for the Republican nomination for Virginia's Senate seat currently held by Democrat Sen. Jim Webb, and Radtke plans to make a formal announcement in January.

Radtke said the recent tax deal passed by Congress and increased national spending contributed to her decision to run.
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Filed under: 2012 • Jim Webb • Tea Party movement • Virginia
December 8th, 2010
05:55 PM ET
3 years ago

Webb faces 'reality' on tax cuts, 'don't ask, don't tell'

Washington (CNN)- Departing from the most vocal of his base, Democratic Virginia Senator Jim Webb believes the tax deal proposed by President Obama is "a good way for us to reinvigorate the economy" and tells Chief National Correspondent John King in an interview that "the 'don't ask, don't tell' policy is a flawed policy."

Appearing on CNN's John King, USA, Wednesday at 7 p.m.ET, Webb calls President Obama's proposal a "true act of leadership" and says the "people are calling for some sort of stimulus to the economy." For Webb, Obama's tax deal is the answer.
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Filed under: Don't Ask Don't Tell • Jim Webb • Tax deal
May 30th, 2010
01:41 PM ET
4 years ago

'They should not have done this,' Dem says of DADT fast track

'I was really disappointed in -- in the way that this process was accelerated,' Sen. Webb told CNN.
'I was really disappointed in - in the way that this process was accelerated,' Sen. Webb told CNN.

Washington (CNN) – A leading Democratic voice on military affairs has criticized members of his own party for the hurried way in which congressional Democrats and the White House are pushing through the repeal of the military’s “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy.

President Obama, Defense Secretary Robert Gates and Adm. Mike Mullen, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, have all stated their belief that the policy should be changed. In an effort to lay the groundwork to do away with “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” Gates and Mullen have commissioned a thorough survey of U.S. service members in order to ascertain how the force structure feels as a whole about having openly gay and lesbian members serving within their midst.

Related: Mullen on DADT review

The results of the review will not be available until December but in an apparent acknowledgement that they may not have sufficient votes to support a repeal after this November’s midterms, the White House and Democrats on Capitol Hill moved forward last week with efforts to pass a law that would repeal the policy. The House approved the provision as part of a larger defense spending bill and the Senate Armed Services Committee also approved the measure. The legislation, if passed, would not take effect until the military’s internal review is completed; it also requires the president, Gates, and Mullen to sign off on the policy change.

Notwithstanding these measures intended to defer to the Pentagon, Sen. Jim Webb, D-Virginia, still faulted the legislative moves to fast track the repeal.

“I was really disappointed in - in the way that this process was accelerated. I was the only Democrat that voted against this in committee markup,” Webb said in an interview aired Sunday on CNN’s State of the Union.

Webb, himself a Vietnam veteran and a former Secretary of the Navy, sits on the Senate Armed Forces Committee and is the Chairman of the Armed Forces Personnel Subcommittee.

“I believe we had a process in place. And to preempt it in some ways, showed a disrespect for the people in the military,” Webb told CNN Chief Political Correspondent Candy Crowley.

“They should not have done this,” Webb added.
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January 20th, 2010
05:36 AM ET
4 years ago

Democrat: Suspend health care reform until Brown is seated

Sen. Jim Webb of Virginia said it would be 'fair and prudent' to suspend health care reform legislation.
Sen. Jim Webb of Virginia said it would be 'fair and prudent' to suspend health care reform legislation.

Washington (CNN) – A moderate Democratic senator is calling on his colleagues to shelve health care reform legislation until Massachusetts Republican Scott Brown takes his seat in the United States Senate.

"In many ways the campaign in Massachusetts became a referendum not only on health care reform but also on the openness and integrity of our government process, Sen. Jim Webb of Virginia said in a statement Tuesday after Brown defeated Democrat Martha Coakley in the special election for the late Sen. Edward Kennedy's seat.

"It is vital that we restore the respect of the American people in our system of government and in our leaders. To that end, I believe it would only be fair and prudent that we suspend further votes on health care legislation until Senator-elect Brown is seated."


Filed under: 2010 • Jim Webb • Scott Brown • Virginia
January 19th, 2010
11:10 PM ET
4 years ago

Democrat: Suspend health care reform until Brown is seated

Sen. Jim Webb of Virginia said it would be 'fair and prudent' to suspend health care reform legislation.
Sen. Jim Webb of Virginia said it would be 'fair and prudent' to suspend health care reform legislation.

Washington (CNN) – A moderate Democratic senator is calling on his colleagues to shelve health care reform legislation until Massachusetts Republican Scott Brown takes his seat in the United States Senate.

"In many ways the campaign in Massachusetts became a referendum not only on health care reform but also on the openness and integrity of our government process, Sen. Jim Webb of Virginia said in a statement Tuesday after Brown defeated Democrat Martha Coakley in the special election for the late Sen. Edward Kennedy's seat.

"It is vital that we restore the respect of the American people in our system of government and in our leaders. To that end, I believe it would only be fair and prudent that we suspend further votes on health care legislation until Senator-elect Brown is seated."


Filed under: 2010 • Extra • Jim Webb • Massachusetts • Popular Posts • Scott Brown • Virginia
October 25th, 2009
02:19 PM ET
4 years ago

Webb gets 'The Last Word'


WASHINGTON (CNN) - Democratic Sen. Jim Webb gave the Obama administration a mixed report card Sunday on CNN's State of the Union: questioning the administration's approach to health care reform but praising its approach to the war in Afghanistan.

On health care reform, Webb suggested that President Obama had pursued the wrong strategy to gain passage of Obama's key domestic agenda item during the first year of his presidency.

"That's been the difficulty since day one," Webb said Sunday of the White House's approach, "It's something that I actually said to the White House more than four months ago – that they should have come down with a very clear template in terms of what they were expecting.

"From that, we should have had hearings and the Congress should have legislated. And, having done it the reverse way with these five different bills percolating up through committees, it's really difficult to see even what we are voting for."

On the substance of health care reform, "in an ideal world," said Webb, "we should be looking at not-for-profit insurance companies."

Notwithstanding his differences with the process the White House chose to pursue, Webb told CNN Chief National Correspondent John King that he has given his commitment to support Democratic efforts to break any filibuster of the health care reform bill.

"One thing I did say to [Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid] is I will vote to proceed forward to debate," Webb said Sunday.
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Filed under: Afghanistan • Health care • Jim Webb • Popular Posts • State of the Union
August 15th, 2009
10:09 AM ET
5 years ago

U.S. senator obtains release of American in Myanmar

Sen. Jim Webb speaks at a press conference in Laos Thursday as part of a two-week Southeast Asia trip.
Sen. Jim Webb speaks at a press conference in Laos Thursday as part of a two-week Southeast Asia trip.

(CNN) - U.S. Sen. Jim Webb obtained the release Saturday of American John Yettaw, who had been sentenced to seven years of hard labor in Myanmar for visiting pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi, his office said.

Webb, who chairs the East Asia and Pacific Affairs Subcommittee of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, will accompany Yettaw to Bangkok, Thailand, Sunday on a military aircraft, his office said.

It is the second success in a day for the Democrat from Virginia, who earlier held separate meetings with Suu Kyi and Myanmar's top official, junta leader Senior Gen. Than Shwe.

"It is my hope that we can take advantage of these gestures as a way to begin laying a foundation of goodwill and confidence-building in the future," Webb said in a statement.

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Filed under: Jim Webb
August 14th, 2009
02:50 PM ET
5 years ago

U.S. Senator arrives in Myanmar to meet junta

 U.S. Senator Jim Webb arrived in Myanmar on Friday where he is scheduled to meet with the reclusive country's military junta.
U.S. Senator Jim Webb arrived in Myanmar on Friday where he is scheduled to meet with the reclusive country's military junta.

WASHINGTON (CNN) – U.S. Senator Jim Webb arrived in Myanmar on Friday where he is scheduled to meet with the reclusive country's military junta, his office confirmed.

The Virginia Democrat is the first member of Congress to visit Myanmar in more than a decade. It will also be the first time a U.S. official meets with Myanmar's top official, junta leader Senior General Than Shwe.

Webb is chairman of the East Asia and Pacific Affairs Subcommittee of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

Webb is scheduled to depart Myanmar - also known as Burma - on Sunday. His office would not discuss what the first-term senator plans to discuss during his scheduled meeting with Than Shwe.

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Filed under: Jim Webb
February 2nd, 2009
12:30 PM ET
3 years ago

New government commission blasts Iraq waste, fraud

'Every interested American knows that there was rampant fraud, waste, and abuse following the invasion of Iraq,' Sen. Jim Webb, D-Virginia, said.
'Every interested American knows that there was rampant fraud, waste, and abuse following the invasion of Iraq,' Sen. Jim Webb, D-Virginia, said.

WASHINGTON (CNN) - Citing the need to restore public trust in an inefficient and allegedly corrupt military procurement process, a new government commission Monday officially began hearings to account for billions of taxpayer dollars misspent in Iraq and Afghanistan.

"Every interested American knows that there was rampant fraud, waste, and abuse following the invasion of Iraq," Sen. Jim Webb, D-Virginia, said at the opening hearing of the Commission on Wartime Contracting in Iraq and Afghanistan.

"They all know it, and they want us to demonstrate that we're willing to do something about it not simply in terms of process but in terms of accountability."

The seven-member commission begins its work as the U.S. military prepares to cut troop levels in Iraq, but strengthen its presence in Afghanistan, where Taliban and al-Qaeda elements have made gains in recent years.

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Filed under: Jim Webb
October 17th, 2008
12:49 PM ET
6 years ago

Webb on Palin: McCain wondering, ‘What was I thinking?’

 Senator Jim Webb thinks that McCain is now regretting his VP selection.
Senator Jim Webb thinks that McCain is now regretting his VP selection.

ROANOKE, Virginia (CNN) – Introducing Barack Obama at a Friday campaign event, Virginia Senator Jim Webb questioned John McCain’s vice presidential pick and said it was a decision the Republican nominee now probably regrets.

“Do you really think that Sarah Palin is the most qualified person in the Republican Party?” asked Webb. “I don’t know how many people here like country music? I like country music. There’s a song about two years ago it was called ‘I know what I was doing but what was I thinking?’ I think John McCain is probably singing that song right now,” he added, referring to the Dierks Bentley tune “What was I thinking?”

“If you’re trying to talk to friends about clear distinctions in terms of judgment, temperament, vision, this is something you can really ask them to take a look at,” he said.

Webb said the choice of a running mate was the one real window into the kind of judgment a future president would exhibit in office. He said he did not really “understand the process” by which McCain picked Governor Palin but said Obama’s choice of Biden was “thoughtful,” and Biden is “capable in a moment of stepping forward” into the presidency.

“I watched the vice presidential debate and I thought Joe Biden did a very good job and at the beginning f the debate Governor Palin turned around and said ‘nice to meet you can I call you Joe’ and I was thinking Joe what you really ought to do is say ‘yeah, you can call me whatever you want - in two months you can call me Mr. Vice President,’” Webb said.

The junior senator said southwestern Virginia voters can “trust [Obama]” - and that the “Karl Rove” type campaign going on against him has gotten tough.

“What they do is they say that person is not like you that person doesn’t understand you,” he said. “There’s a lot of comments that have been made about certain ethnic issues in this campaign, and I would like to say we know Barack Obama’s father was born in Kenya. Barack Obama’s mother was born in Kansas by way of Kentucky. We’re going to see on Election Day the election of the 44th President of the United States, whose ancestry and whose family line goes back to the mountains of this area.”


Filed under: Jim Webb • John McCain • Sarah Palin
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