January 24th, 2010
01:42 PM ET
4 years ago

Pollster confirms little polling by Democrats in Senate race

Pollster Celinda Lake said Sunday that Martha Coakley, the Democratic candidate who lost last Tuesday's special Senate election in Massachusetts, ran no polls for several weeks in the short campaign because Coakley's campaign lacked funding.
Pollster Celinda Lake said Sunday that Martha Coakley, the Democratic candidate who lost last Tuesday's special Senate election in Massachusetts, ran no polls for several weeks in the short campaign because Coakley's campaign lacked funding.

Washington (CNN) - Money talked in the Massachusetts special election last week that reshaped the U.S. political landscape by filling Ted Kennedy's Senate seat with a Republican.

Democratic pollster Celinda Lake revealed Sunday on CNN's "State of the Union" that Martha Coakley, the Democratic candidate, ran no polls for several weeks in the short campaign because she lacked funding.

According to Lake, Coakley, the Massachusetts attorney general, asked national Democratic organizations for funding for her campaign but was turned down. Lake said Democratic officials told Coakley, "You don't need it."

By contrast, Brown ran daily field polling from Dec. 31, said Republican pollster Neil Newhouse. Brown's campaign received strong backing from conservative groups and national Republicans.

The revelation added to a widespread perception that Democrats believed Coakley would easily win the race for the Senate seat held for almost 47 years by Kennedy, a liberal Democrat, until his death last August.
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Filed under: Martha Coakley • Massachusetts • Popular Posts • Scott Brown • Senate • State of the Union
January 23rd, 2010
04:45 PM ET
4 years ago

Poll: Voter anger helped GOP pull Senate upset

ALT TEXT

A new poll shows voter anger at current conditions in the country right now and at the Democrats' agenda in Washington helped fuel Browns victory. (Getty Images)

(CNN) - Voter anger at current conditions in the country right now and at the Democrats' agenda in Washington helped fuel the upset victory of Republican Scott Brown in Tuesday's special senate election in Massachusetts, according to a new poll.

The survey, conducted right after the Tuesday election by the Washington Post, the Kaiser Family Foundation and Harvard University, was released Saturday morning.

Nearly two-thirds of Brown voters questioned in the poll say that their vote was partially to express opposition to the Democrats agenda in Washington. And three-quarters of people who cast ballots for Brown, a Massachusetts state senator, say they are dissatisfied or angry with the policies of President Barack Obama's administration.

Brown narrowly defeated state attorney general Martha Coakley in the special election to fill the last three years of the term of the late Sen. Ted Kennedy. Brown became the first Massachusetts Republican to win a senate election since 1972. Brown's victory in a state where Democrats win most elections, preceded by GOP victories in gubernatorial contests in New Jersey and Virginia last November, appear to have put the Democrats on the defensive.

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Filed under: Martha Coakley • Popular Posts • Scott Brown
January 23rd, 2010
09:39 AM ET
4 years ago

Massachusetts Message: Not satisfied with promised 'change'

Boston, Massachusetts (CNN) - Candace Brooks is a Democrat who voted for the losing candidate Tuesday. Yet she, too, is part of the Massachusetts Message.

"I literally stood over the ballot, and I was, like, almost Scott Brown," Brooks said over breakfast the morning after Republican Brown's stunning upset in the Massachusetts Senate race. "I was almost there."

Almost there - almost casting a Republican vote - a little more than a year after her enthusiasm for Barack Obama convinced her to switch from "unenrolled," or independent, to a registered Democrat.

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Filed under: Martha Coakley • Massachusetts • Scott Brown • Senate • State of the Union
January 20th, 2010
07:48 PM ET
January 20th, 2010
09:29 AM ET
4 years ago

Coakley pollster hits back

ALT TEXT

A top pollster for Martha Coakley says what happened in Massachussetts could happen to Democrats across the country next fall. (Getty Images)

Boston (CNN) - Martha Coakley's top pollster Celinda Lake has a warning for Democrats, insisting that tonight's loss is part of an anti-incumbent fever that threatens to take down Democrats across the nation.

"There's a wave here. The first shore was New Jersey and Virginia," Lake told CNN Tuesday, referring to Democratic losses in the governor's races in New Jersey and Virginia. "The second was Massachusetts, and it's coming to the island now, so we'd better do something about it."

She added: "We need to understand that angry voters are the ones turning out to vote. Our base complacent. We need to respond to that.

Lake, formerly a pollster for Joe Biden's presidential and vice presidential campaigns, was responding to a barrage of criticism lobbed by national Democrats at the Coakley campaign and Lake personally. In various news reports Tuesday, they anonymously accused Coakley of waging a weak and misguided campaign and failing to recognize the surge by her Republican opponent until it was too late.

White House aides have aggressively refuted suggestions that a Coakely loss is a repudiation of the President or his policies - insisting that the President's polling numbers are strong in Massachusetts. (While his personal approval is high, some polls show his job approval below 50 percent, and lower among independents.)

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Filed under: Democrats • Martha Coakley • Massachusetts • Popular Posts • Scott Brown • Senate
January 20th, 2010
07:31 AM ET
4 years ago

Analysis: Brown's win changes political narrative for 2010

A surprise Republican victory in Massachusetts have left Democrats concerned.
A surprise Republican victory in Massachusetts have left Democrats concerned.

Washington (CNN) - Look no further than the two warning flares shot up from Virginia and New Hampshire Tuesday evening to understand how concerned Democrats are about the political consequences of losing the late Sen. Edward Kennedy's seat to Republican Scott Brown.

Sen. Jim Webb, D-Virginia, called on his Democratic colleagues to suspend votes on their controversial health care legislation, warning it would be wrong to try to muscle a bill through Congress before Brown was sworn into office.

"In many ways, the campaign in Massachusetts became a referendum not only on health care reform but also on the openness and integrity of our government process," Webb said in a statement.

Some 500 miles to the north, New Hampshire Democratic Party Chairman Ray Buckley sent out an urgent plea for donations to help fund a special election next month for a state senate seat he fears losing.

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Filed under: Martha Coakley • Massachusetts • Scott Brown • Senate
January 20th, 2010
07:01 AM ET
4 years ago

Brown: I hope they are paying attention

Boston (CNN) - Scott Brown heralded his upset victory in Tuesday's special U.S. Senate election in Massachusetts as the start of an overhaul of Washington politics.

In a victory speech to a chanting crowd, the Republican state senator paid tribute to liberal Democrat Ted Kennedy, who held the seat Brown won for almost 47 years before dying of brain cancer last August.

Calling Kennedy "a tireless worker and a good-hearted public servant," Brown said his first call after winning went to Kennedy's widow, Vicki.

"I told her that his name would always command the affection and respect of the people of the state of Massachusetts," Brown said, adding: "There's no replacing a man like that. But tonight I honor the memory and pledge that I'll try to be a worthy successor to the late Sen. Kennedy."

Brown called his come-from-behind victory "just the beginning of an election year filled with many, many surprises" for Democrats.
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Filed under: Martha Coakley • Massachusetts • Scott Brown • Senate
January 20th, 2010
07:00 AM ET
January 19th, 2010
11:02 PM ET
4 years ago

Updated: Massachusetts Senate Vote Results

Stay with CNN for the latest updates from Massachusetts.
Stay with CNN for the latest updates from Massachusetts.

Precincts Reporting: 2,163 of 2,168 (99%)

Scott Brown (R) – 1,161,586 (51.9%)
Martha Coakley (D) – 1,055,409 (47.1%)
Joe Kennedy (I) – 22,165 (1.0%)

Source: National Election Pool (compiled by AP)


Filed under: Martha Coakley • Popular Posts • Scott Brown
January 19th, 2010
09:47 PM ET
4 years ago

Coakley 'heartbroken' over loss

A 'heartbroken' Martha Coakley congratulated her Republican opponent Tuesday on his upset victory over her to fill the U.S. Senate seat held for decades by liberal Democrat Ted Kennedy.
A 'heartbroken' Martha Coakley congratulated her Republican opponent Tuesday on his upset victory over her to fill the U.S. Senate seat held for decades by liberal Democrat Ted Kennedy.

Boston (CNN) - A "heartbroken" Martha Coakley congratulated her Republican opponent Tuesday on his upset victory over her to fill the U.S. Senate seat held for decades by liberal Democrat Ted Kennedy.

In a subdued concession speech, Coakley, the Democratic Massachusetts attorney general, said she expected a tough assessment of her loss and lots of "Wednesday-morning quarterbacking" after losing a seat held by Democrats for more than 50 years.

"I am heartbroken at the result," Coakley said, later adding: "Although I am very disappointed, I always respect the voters' choice."

Coakley's defeat to Republican state Sen. Scott Brown was a major blow to Democrats, who now lose their super-majority control of the Senate to imperil President Barack Obama's domestic agenda.

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Filed under: Martha Coakley • Scott Brown
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