Gingrich to attend cattle call in New Orleans
June 10th, 2011
08:35 AM ET
3 years ago

Gingrich to attend cattle call in New Orleans

Manchester, New Hampshire (CNN) – We're learning a bit more about where Newt Gingrich will be over the next week.

An aide close to the former House speaker and Republican presidential candidate tells CNN that Gingrich will still speak Thursday at the Republican Leadership Conference in New Orleans, which runs Thursday through Saturday. Many of the GOP presidential candidates and potential candidates are scheduled to speak at the event, which will also hold a presidential nomination straw poll.
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Filed under: 2012 • New Orleans • Newt Gingrich
August 29th, 2010
04:40 PM ET
4 years ago

Even for the president: No such thing as a free lunch

 President Obama ordered lunch Sunday at Parkway Bakery and Tavern in New Orleans.
President Obama ordered lunch Sunday at Parkway Bakery and Tavern in New Orleans.

(CNN) – Here's a line that would certainly grab your attention if it were called out on the intercom as you're enjoying a lovely Gulf shrimp sandwich for lunch: "Barack, pickup!"

President Obama was already mingling with the patrons of the legendary Parkway Bakery and Tavern in New Orleans when his lunch order was called. Some locals received a hug from the president–even though he cut to the front of line.

"We're just glad to see you," one woman told him, "Thanks for coming down."

Obama ran into trouble, though, when he attempted to pay for the first family's lunch. Failing to produce enough money for the food, he called over a White House staffer who produced a $20 bill for the cash-strapped commander-in-chief.

Six more photos of President Obama at Parkway Bakery and Tavern, after the jump:
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Filed under: New Orleans • President Obama
August 29th, 2010
03:58 PM ET
4 years ago

Marking Katrina anniversary, Obama praises New Orleans' resilience

ALT TEXT President Obama praised the resilience of New Orleans residents on Sunday, exactly five years after Hurricane Katrina wiped out the city. (PHOTO CREDIT: Getty Images)

New Orleans, Louisiana (CNN) – Calling the federal response to Hurricane Katrina "a shameful breakdown in government," President Barack Obama said Sunday as rebuilding continues, officials are looking ahead to avoid a repeat when future disasters strike.

Speaking at Xavier University of Louisiana in New Orleans to mark the fifth anniversary of Katrina, Obama said construction of a fortified levee system to protect the city is underway and will be finished by next year, "We should not be playing Russian roulette every hurricane season," he said.

"There is no need to dwell on what you experienced and what the world witnessed," the president said, speaking to a crowd that included current New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu and members of Louisiana's Congressional delegation.

"We all remember it keenly - water pouring through broken levees; mothers holding their children above the waterline; people stranded on rooftops begging for help; and bodies lying in the streets of a great American city," Obama said. "It was a natural disaster but also a man-made catastrophe; a shameful breakdown in government that left countless men and women and children abandoned and alone."

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Filed under: New Orleans • President Obama
August 29th, 2010
03:15 PM ET
4 years ago

Obama: New levee system in NOLA to be finished in 2011

(CNN) – Saying, "we should not be playing Russian roulette every hurricane season," President Barack Obama said Sunday the construction of a fortified levee system to protect the city of New Orleans, Louisiana, is underway, and will be finished by next year.


Filed under: New Orleans • President Obama
August 27th, 2010
08:42 PM ET
4 years ago

Nagin on seeking future public office: 'I have given my pound of flesh'

 Former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin told CNN’s John King on Friday that he will not seek public office.
Former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin told CNN’s John King on Friday that he will not seek public office.

(CNN) - Ray Nagin, the former mayor of New Orleans who was both praised and criticized for his leadership during Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath, told CNN Friday night that he will not seek public office again.

“I have kind of given my pound of flesh, my pint of blood,” Nagin said on John King USA. “Katrina has definitely extended my political life a lot quicker than I’d like.”

Nagin was first elected mayor in 2002 and squeaked out re-election with a 4-point victory over Louisiana Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu in 2006, after Katrina. Due to term limits, Nagin could not seek a third term and stepped down from office in May.

He drew heavy criticism when, in a 2006 speech on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, he urged residents to rebuild a "chocolate New Orleans" and said, "You can't have New Orleans no other way."

Watch the interview after the jump:
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Filed under: JKUSA • John King USA • New Orleans • Ray Nagin
July 18th, 2010
03:00 PM ET
June 16th, 2010
08:00 AM ET
May 3rd, 2010
09:31 AM ET
4 years ago

Oil spill presents first challenge for Mitch Landrieu

 Mitch Landrieu first day as mayor will be consumed with the challenges of the massive oil spill.
Mitch Landrieu first day as mayor will be consumed with the challenges of the massive oil spill.

(CNN) - The first white mayor of New Orleans in more than 30 years steps into his first challenge as soon as he takes office Monday: the massive oil slick that is creeping to his coast.

The fallout from a ruptured undersea well off Louisiana is spewing about 210,000 gallons (5,000 barrels) of crude a day into the Gulf of Mexico. And efforts to corral the rapidly growing oil spill have so far been unsuccessful.

The slick was still nine miles off the Louisiana coast early Monday, but seas of 6 to 10 feet have made deploying booms to fend the spill off the coast "somewhat problematic," Adm. Thad Allen, the commandant of the Coast Guard, has said.

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Filed under: Energy • Mitch Landrieu • New Orleans
February 9th, 2010
06:41 PM ET
5 years ago

Carville: Saints win, Landrieu election bringing NOLA together

Carville: The Saints are a large part of the fabric of the community here and have helped to bring everyone together in the toughest of times.
Carville: The Saints are a large part of the fabric of the community here and have helped to bring everyone together in the toughest of times.

Underdogs and comebacks are hailed in American culture; perhaps this is why there will be so much said and written about our New Orleans Saints’ 31-17 victory in Super Bowl XLIV and what it means to a once-water-logged city and its tenacious residents.

I am as excited about the outcome of the game as any other member of the Who Dat Nation, but perhaps as important as bringing home the Vince Lombardi trophy, this win gives New Orleans an opportunity to highlight how far she has come and how promising her future looks today.

For as challenging a decade as the 2000s were for New Orleans, the 2010s may prove to be the brightest time in the city’s nearly 300-year history. The confluence of the Saints’ win and the historic mayoral election, which Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu won in a landside across racial lines, line up for the city’s best two days since the Battle of New Orleans in 1815.

While we celebrate the team’s victory this evening at the parade, the city and the region will also be celebrating how far we have come as a community. The Saints are a large part of the fabric of the community here and have helped to bring everyone together in the toughest of times. Following the Super Bowl and the mayoral election, there is a unity of spirit and purpose unlike any time in our history. And it’s on display for the world to see.


Filed under: New Orleans • Popular Posts
February 7th, 2010
07:30 AM ET
5 years ago

New Orleans elects first white mayor in more than 30 years

NEW ORLEANS, Louisiana (CNN) - Democrat Mitch Landrieu was elected mayor of New Orleans on Saturday night, becoming the first white mayor of this majority-black city in more than 30 years.

Landrieu, the state's lieutenant governor, captured 66 percent of the nearly 89,000 votes cast.

His closest competitor, a black businessman and fellow Democrat Troy Henry, won 14 percent.

Landrieu takes office in May, replacing the term-limited Ray Nagin.

The city's last white mayor was Landrieu's father, Maurice "Moon" Landrieu, who left office in 1978.
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Filed under: New Orleans
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