August 2nd, 2010
07:25 AM ET
4 years ago

Official: U.S. hopes North Korea will respond to tougher sanctions

Seoul, South Korea (CNN) – The U.S. hopes tougher sanctions against North Korea will pressure the country to end its nuclear weapons program, a State Department official said Monday.

Robert Einhorn, the State Department's special adviser for nonproliferation and arms control, is discussing the sanctions with senior government officials in Seoul, South Korea, and Tokyo, Japan, this week.

"These measures are not directed at the North Korean people, but our objective is to put an end to [North Korea's] destabilizing proliferation activities, to halt illicit activities that help fund its nuclear missile programs and to discourage further provocative actions," Einhorn told reporters, according to a copy of his prepared remarks.

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Filed under: North Korea
July 21st, 2010
08:05 AM ET
4 years ago

Clinton announces new sanctions against North Korea

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton—in South Korea Wednesday—announced new sanctions against North Korea.
Secretary of State Hillary Clinton—in South Korea Wednesday—announced new sanctions against North Korea.

Seoul, South Korea (CNN) – Secretary of State Hillary Clinton announced tougher sanctions Wednesday against North Korea, including freezing some assets in an attempt to keep the Communist dictatorship from buying and selling arms.

The announcement came as Clinton and Secretary of Defense Robert Gates visited South Korea, part of a rare high-level meeting with members of the government of the key Asian ally.

The U.S. delegation arrived in Seoul this week to show support for South Korea over the sinking in March of the warship Chenonan.

A multinational investigation found North Korea responsible for the torpedo attack that killed 46 South Korean sailors.

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Filed under: Hillary Clinton • North Korea
May 24th, 2010
06:25 PM ET
4 years ago

Analysis: Finding the right tone for condemning North Korea

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton spoke Monday in China.
Secretary of State Hillary Clinton spoke Monday in China.

Washington (CNN) - The United States hopes cool, careful language will keep the North Korea crisis from boiling over.

The Obama administration has been vocal in condemning North Korea for sinking a South Korean navy ship in March and killing 46 South Korean sailors. It is accusing North Korea of aggression and provocation.

But you won't hear American officials call this "an act of war." In fact, from President Barack Obama on down the command chain in this latest Korean crisis, "war" is missing in action.

Obama set the tone, offering support and condolences to the South Koreans in March. Once an international investigation was completed last week, a White House statement called the ship sinking "an act of aggression ... one more instance of North Korea's unacceptable behavior and defiance of international law."

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton hit the same notes during her trip to China.

"We are working hard to avoid an escalation, belligerence and provocation," Clinton said Monday. "This is a highly precarious situation that the North Koreans have caused in the region and it is one that every country that neighbors or is in proximity to North Korea understands must be contained."

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Filed under: Hillary Clinton • North Korea
May 24th, 2010
08:33 AM ET
4 years ago

White House backs South Korea's toughened stance

(CNN) – The White House issued a statement Monday morning supporting South Korea's decision to suspend trade and toughen its military stance toward North Korea.

The statement said measures announced by South Korean President Lee Myung-bak Monday are "called for and entirely appropriate." Lee's speech came in the wake of an official investigation's findings that North Korea fired a torpedo on a South Korean warship.

"Specifically, we endorse President Lee's demand that North Korea immediately apologize and punish those responsible for the attack, and, most importantly, stop its belligerent and threatening behavior," the White House statement said. "U.S. support for South Korea's defense is unequivocal, and the President has directed his military commanders to coordinate closely with their Republic of Korea counterparts to ensure readiness and to deter future aggression."


Filed under: North Korea • Obama administration
May 24th, 2010
08:16 AM ET
4 years ago

Clinton urges N. Korea to say what it knows about warship sinking

Sec. of State Hillary Clinton urged North Korea Monday to reveal information about the sinking of a South Korean warship.
Sec. of State Hillary Clinton urged North Korea Monday to reveal information about the sinking of a South Korean warship.

Beijing, China (CNN) – Secretary of State Hillary Clinton urged North Korea Monday to reveal what it knows about the "act of aggression" that sunk a South Korean warship.

She also said the United States' "support for South Korea's defense is unequivocal" and that North Korea should "stop its belligerence and threatening behavior."

South Korea has said a probe concluded the North fired a torpedo that sunk a South Korean military ship in March. The United States supports that finding, Clinton said while in China.

South Korean President Lee Myung-bak announced Monday that his country was suspending trade with North Korea, closing its waters to the North's ships and adopting a newly-aggressive military posture toward its neighbor.

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Filed under: Hillary Clinton • North Korea
February 7th, 2010
09:03 AM ET
4 years ago

Clinton defends Obama's engagement strategy on Iran, N. Korea


Washington (CNN) - President Barack Obama's strategy of engaging both Iran and North Korea has shown positive results by starting to bring together the rest of the world to act jointly against their nuclear ambitions, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said.

In an interview broadcast Sunday on CNN's State of the Union, Clinton replied with a blunt "no" when asked by CNN Senior Political Correspondent Candy Crowley if Iran had taken up Obama on his offer in his inaugural address last year to "extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist."

"But the fact is, because we engaged, the rest of the world has really begun to see Iran the way we see it," Clinton said in the interview conducted Thursday.

Clinton pointed out that a year ago, much of the world, including Russia, did not share the U.S. perception that Iran's nuclear program posed a major threat.

Now there is greater awareness of the threat, Clinton said, due to "a very slow and steady diplomacy plus the fact that we had a two-track process."

"Yes, we reached out on engagement to Iran, but we always had the second track which is that we would have to try to get the world community to take stronger measures if they didn't respond on the engagement front," Clinton said.
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Filed under: Hillary Clinton • Iran • North Korea • Popular Posts • State of the Union
December 10th, 2009
01:39 PM ET
3 months ago

Clinton puts best face on North Korea meeting

 Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said Thursday that recent talks with North Korea were 'quite positive.'
Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said Thursday that recent talks with North Korea were 'quite positive.'

Washington (CNN) - The Obama administration's first high-level direct talks with North Korea yielded no promise by Pyongyang to return to Six- Party negotiations aimed at ending its nuclear program, but Secretary of State Hillary Clinton nonetheless Thursday called the meeting "quite positive."

Asked about the three-day visit to North Korea by special envoy Stephen Bosworth, Clinton told reporters, "I think for a preliminary meeting it was quite positive."

Clinton said she agreed with Ambassador Bosworth that the talks were "very useful" and added: "It does remain to be seen whether and when the North Koreans will return to the Six-Party talks but the bottom line is that these were exploratory talks, not negotiations."

Clinton said the talks "were intended to do exactly what they did: reaffirm the commitment of the United States to the Six-Party process, to the denuclearization of the Korean peninsula, and to discuss with the North Koreans their reactions to what we are asking them to do in order to move forward."
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Filed under: Hillary Clinton • North Korea
October 21st, 2009
03:17 PM ET
4 years ago

U.S. still open to Iran negotiations, Clinton says

Secretary of State Clinton spoke Wednesday at the U.S. Institute of Peace, a non-partisan think tank.
Secretary of State Clinton spoke Wednesday at the U.S. Institute of Peace, a non-partisan think tank.

WASHINGTON (CNN) – Secretary of State Hillary Clinton stressed Wednesday that the White House remains open to diplomatic engagement with the Iranian government if Tehran is serious about negotiations regarding its controversial nuclear program.

"If Iran is serious about taking practical steps to address the international community's deep concerns about (the) program, we will continue to engage both multilaterally and bilaterally to discuss the full range of issues that have divided Iran and the United States for too long," she said.

"The door is open to a better future for Iran. But the process of engagement cannot be open-ended. We are not prepared to talk just for the sake of talking."

Clinton made her remarks during a wide-ranging speech on nuclear non-proliferation at the U.S. Institute of Peace, a non-partisan think tank.
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Filed under: Hillary Clinton • Iran • North Korea
September 20th, 2009
09:00 AM ET
5 years ago

Obama shares Bill Clinton's assessment of North Korea's leader


WASHINGTON (CNN) – Former President Bill Clinton got more from his visit to North Korea than the release of two American journalists. Clinton, whose wife is Secretary of State, was able to bring valuable information back to the White House about North Korean leader Kim Jong-Il, President Obama tells CNN.

"I think President Clinton's assessment was that [Kim's] - he's pretty healthy and in control," President Obama said in an interview that airs Sunday on CNN's State of the Union, "And that's important to know, because we don't have a lot of interaction with the North Koreans. And, you know, President Clinton had a chance to see him close up and have conversations with him.

"I won't go into any more details than that. But there's no doubt that this is somebody who, you know, I think for a while people thought was slipping away. He's reasserted himself. It does appear that he's concerned about - he was more concerned about succession when he was - succession when he was sick, maybe less so now that he's well."

Obama also told CNN Chief National Correspondent John King that his administration's approach to the largely-isolated Asian nation "is a success story so far."
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August 20th, 2009
12:02 PM ET
5 years ago

Richardson: discussions with N. Koreans show a 'bit of a thaw'

Richardson said that North Korea wanted direct talks with the United States.
Richardson said that North Korea wanted direct talks with the United States.

(CNN) – A day after meeting with New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson, two North Korean diplomats will meet Thursday with community and business leaders in the state to discuss renewable energy initiatives, the governor's office said.

Richardson spokesman Gilbert Gallegos said the governor would not be part of the briefings because he would be in Las Cruces. However, the governor will try to meet them at the Albuquerque airport before they leave, Gallegos said.

After meeting Wednesday with Kim Myong Gil and Taek Jong Ho - senior diplomats with the North Korean mission to the United Nations - Richardson said that North Korea wanted direct talks with the United States.

"I think there's a little bit of a thaw," he told CNN's American Morning on Thursday. "I think they wanted to basically send a message that they're ready to engage in a dialogue with the United States."

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Filed under: Bill Richardson • North Korea
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