Obama pushes for minimum wage increase
February 22nd, 2014
01:19 PM ET
2 months ago

Obama pushes for minimum wage increase

Washington (CNN) - It may be a "year of action" for President Obama, but there is one thing he cannot do without Congress: raise the minimum wage.

In his weekly address Saturday, the President took the opportunity to make another plea, appealing to the public to pressure representatives to "give America a raise."

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Filed under: Minimum wage • Obama address • President Obama
Obama holds firm on budget, calls on House Republicans to "stop this farce"
October 5th, 2013
10:08 AM ET
6 months ago

Obama holds firm on budget, calls on House Republicans to "stop this farce"

WASHINGTON (CNN) – In his weekly address President Obama criticized Republicans for holding the U.S. democracy and economy "hostage." The President had strong words for House Republicans, who he is calling on to pass a budget to stop the government shutdown.

"Take that vote. Stop this farce. End this shutdown now," Obama said.

Obama also highlighted letters from constituents describing how the government shutdown is affecting the day-to-day lives of American citizens.
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Filed under: Congress • Government Shutdown • Healthcare • House • Obama address
Obama to discuss financial crisis anniversary Monday
September 14th, 2013
02:11 PM ET
7 months ago

Obama to discuss financial crisis anniversary Monday

WASHINGTON (CNN) - President Barack Obama will deliver remarks in the Rose Garden on Monday to mark the five-year anniversary of the collapse of Lehman Brothers, which triggered a massive, nationwide financial meltdown.

A White House official said Obama would discuss his record on creating jobs during the first five years of his presidency, as well as his administration's continued efforts to bolster hiring. The unemployment rate currently stands at 7.3% - far lower than when Obama took office in January 2009, but still high compared to historic levels.

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September 10th, 2013
07:41 PM ET
7 months ago

Obama’s Syria address a speechwriter’s tall order

Washington (CNN) – The hardest job in Washington today belongs to President Barack Obama’s speechwriters - they have to craft an address calling for a vote in Congress that Obama may or may not abide by, over a military strike the president may or may not need, for a war he’s said he prefers not to wage.

So how do you make that one sing?
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Filed under: Obama address • President Obama • Syria
Pryor a 'no' on Syria
Sen. Mark Pryor, seen here in a political ad, is a "no" on striking Syria.
September 7th, 2013
01:53 PM ET
7 months ago

Pryor a 'no' on Syria

WASHINGTON (CNN) - As the Obama administration sells its plan for limited military strikes against Syria, an Arkansas Democrat says he "cannot support military action at this time."

Sen. Mark Pryor issued a statement Saturday saying President Obama and his national security team have not yet made an effective case for taking action against President Bashar al-Assad’s regime.

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February 25th, 2009
09:15 AM ET
5 years ago

Poll: Obama's speech scored with viewers

Two-thirds of those who watched the President's speech reacted favorably, according to a CNN/Opinion Research Corp. poll conducted after the speech Tuesday night.
Two-thirds of those who watched the President's speech reacted favorably, according to a CNN/Opinion Research Corp. poll conducted after the speech Tuesday night.

WASHINGTON (CNN) – A new national poll indicates that two-thirds of those who watched President Obama's address to a joint session of Congress reacted favorably to his speech.

Sixty-eight percent of speech-watchers questioned in a CNN/Opinion Research Corporation survey Tuesday night had a very positive reaction to the president's address, with 24 percent suggesting they had a somewhat positive response and 8 percent indicating they had a negative reaction.

Since the president is a Democrat, the audience watching his speech is a bit out of line with the nation's breakdown by party. The speech audience questioned in the CNN/Opinion Research Corporation poll is about 8 to 10 points more Democratic than the general public.

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Filed under: CNN poll • Obama address • President Obama
February 25th, 2009
09:00 AM ET
5 years ago

Analysis: Obama takes 'morning in America' mantle

President Obama takes a page from Ronald Reagan's playbook in his speech to Congress.
President Obama takes a page from Ronald Reagan's playbook in his speech to Congress.

WASHINGTON (CNN) - President Barack Obama addressed Congress shortly after 9 p.m. Tuesday, but a casual viewer might have believed it was actually morning in America.

Watch: Obama lays out agenda

"Morning in America" was the theme of Ronald Reagan's 1984 re-election campaign, and it was front and center in Obama's most critical event since Inauguration Day.

The president who has pledged to reverse much of Reagan's economic revolution took a page from the 40th president's playbook in his 52-minute speech, striking a defiantly optimistic tone that belied the nation's sour mood and rebutted critics who have accused him of intentionally talking down the economy for short-term political gain.

"Though we are living through difficult and uncertain times, tonight I want every American to know this: We will rebuild, we will recover and the United States of America will emerge stronger than before," Obama declared to a thunderous round of applause from a packed House chamber.

Delivered against a backdrop of dismal economic news and with polls showing overwhelming majorities of Americans believing the country is on the wrong track, Obama's first speech to Congress amounted to a political tour de force. He proposed what many claim is a complete overhaul of the country's economic foundation while ripping his conservative predecessors for transferring "wealth to the wealthy" and gutting regulations "for the sake of a quick profit at the expense of a healthy market."

And he did it while employing some of Reagan's favorite rhetorical tools. Obama stuck to a fairly short list of priorities while invoking traditional American values of responsibility, hard work and thrift to pound home a back-to-basics message.

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Filed under: Obama address
February 25th, 2009
08:59 AM ET
5 years ago

In GOP response, Jindal calls stimulus 'irresponsible'

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal gives the GOP response to President Obama's address Tuesday.
Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal gives the GOP response to President Obama's address Tuesday.

(CNN) - Tapped by the Republican party to deliver the GOP's response to President Barack Obama's congressional address Tuesday night, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal took on the massive stimulus package and big government - and pledged that his party would regain the nation's trust.

Watch: Jindal responds to Obama

"In the end, it comes down to an honest and fundamental disagreement about the proper role of government," Jindal said. "We oppose the national Democratic view that says the way to strengthen our country is to increase dependence on government. We believe the way to strengthen our country is to restrain spending in Washington, to empower individuals and small businesses to grow our economy and create jobs.

"In recent years, these distinctions in philosophy became less clear - our party got away from its principles. Tonight, on behalf of our leaders in Congress and my fellow Republican governors, I say this: Our party is determined to regain your trust," Jindal said.

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Filed under: Bobby Jindal • Obama address
February 25th, 2009
05:30 AM ET
5 years ago

South Carolina student becomes face of stimulus package

South Carolina student Ty'Sheoma Bethea was invited to the speech after she wrote a letter to lawmakers.
South Carolina student Ty'Sheoma Bethea was invited to the speech after she wrote a letter to lawmakers.

(CNN) – Her school has become a symbol of the kind of crumbling infrastructure that President Obama hopes his stimulus bill will improve.

But on Tuesday, Ty'Sheoma Bethea became the face of the issue, when she joined first lady Michelle Obama as her guest for the president's first speech to a joint session of Congress.

The White House invited Ty'Sheoma, a student at the J.V. Martin Junior High School in Dillon, South Carolina, after a letter she sent lawmakers appealing for help rebuilding her school made its way to the president.

The eighth-grader reportedly boarded her first plane with her mother, Dina Leach, from South Carolina to Washington to attend the speech.

The eighth-grader was inspired to write the letter by Obama, who mentioned her school in his first presidential news conference on February 9. After visiting the school, he referenced J.V. Martin as evidence of educational institutions that would benefit from school construction funding in his $787 billion stimulus package.

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Filed under: Obama address
February 25th, 2009
05:27 AM ET
3 years ago

Banker in Obama speech recognized for his generosity

Leonard Abess Jr. was recognized by President Obama during Tuesday's State of the Nation speech.
Leonard Abess Jr. was recognized by President Obama during Tuesday's State of the Nation speech.

WASHINGTON (CNN) - More than two dozen guests joined first lady Michelle Obama at the president's speech to a joint session of Congress Tuesday night.

One person on the first lady's guest list was Leonard Abess Jr., a Miami banker who received a $60 million bonus from the proceeds from the sale of shares of City National Bank in Florida and gave it out to his 399 workers and 72 former workers.

During his speech, President Obama said Abess didn't tell anyone about his generosity, but when the local newspaper found out, Abess simply said, "I knew some of these people since I was 7 years old. I didn't feel right getting the money myself."

Abess demonstrates the kind of "responsibility" the president has called for from high-profile financial CEOs, the White House said.

Obama contrasted Abess' story with the greed that he said got the country into the problems it faces now.

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Filed under: Obama address
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