Overheard on CNN.com: Gerrymandering in American politics
November 18th, 2011
02:13 PM ET
3 years ago

Overheard on CNN.com: Gerrymandering in American politics

Washington (CNN) – CNN is taking a look at the redistricting process, which takes place every 10 years after each census is complete. In the last 10 years, 78% of the seats in the U.S. House of Representatives did not change party hands even once.

David Wasserman, redistricting expert for the nonpartisan Cook Political Report, says that through redistricting elections can be "almost rigged" in a sense and this can lead to a more polarized Congress. Readers responded to this story by expressing a degree of cynicism about the political process on both sides of the aisle. Some even questioned whether they should vote at all.

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Filed under: Congress • House of Representatives • Politics • Redistricting
11 political myths that we still fall for
April 21st, 2011
09:22 AM ET
4 years ago

11 political myths that we still fall for

Washington (CNN) – Sex, lies and murder. Americans seem to love conspiracy theories and too-good-to-be-true rumors - type "George W. Bush IQ" into Google and watch what you get - especially when it comes to politics.

Did you know that George Washington wasn't the nation's first president? The Mob killed JFK. And, oh yeah, President Obama wasn't born in Hawaii.

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Filed under: Politics
So much for civility in politics
January 21st, 2011
02:43 PM ET
4 years ago

So much for civility in politics

Washington (CNN) – If it's over, it was nice while it lasted.

The brief period of civility in politics in the wake of the shootings in Tucson, Arizona, two weeks ago was tested this week. Some in the nation's capital forgot the call for a government that's worthy of 9-year-old shooting victim Christina Green.

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Filed under: Arizona • Politics
September 23rd, 2010
11:00 AM ET
4 years ago

CNNPolitics.com, Political Ticker’s new look

You may notice that CNNPolitics.com and CNN's Political Ticker have a new look as of Thursday morning.

Consider this a sneak peek at our new politics section and the Internet’s most-popular political blog as we approach the contentious midterm elections.

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Filed under: Politics
July 6th, 2010
11:04 AM ET
4 years ago

How is social media impacting free speech rights?

Aspen, Colorado (CNN) – The future of free speech will be chosen by lawyers and businessmen at companies such as Google, Comcast and Facebook, not by politicians in Washington or the judicial system.

That is George Washington University Law School Professor Jeffrey Rosen's "big idea" he delivered at the Aspen Ideas Festival Monday night to an overflowing crowd of the top leaders in business, politics, technology, and law - including former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor.

Rosen named Nicole Wang, Google's deputy general council, as a company executive who has more say over free speech than most. Wang has the authority to keep or remove YouTube videos. When governments around the world want a video removed, she is woken up to make the decision.

FULL POST


Filed under: Politics • Social Media
June 9th, 2010
11:02 AM ET
5 years ago

Analysis: Winners and losers in Tuesday's races

(CNN) - In a night of many winners and more losers, Arkansas Sen. Blanche Lincoln stood out Tuesday for successfully overcoming an aggressive, multimillion-dollar campaign by national unions and liberal interest groups who desperately sought to slap a pink slip in this Democrat's hands.

No walking papers were issued to Lincoln, who led a small group of major winners - dominated by women - to emerge from Tuesday's primaries. There was also a handful of losers, who probably woke up Wednesday morning wondering what hit them.

A snapshot of winners and losers from Tuesday's primaries:

Winners

Sen. Blanche Lincoln : Labor and liberals had hoped to make an example of Lincoln, who proved over the years that she was not always a reliable Democratic vote, certainly not so on union issues. But this double barrel of labor and liberals failed to send Lincoln to the head of the unemployment line, and she now has five months to make her case for six more years in Washington.

Her win will likely help boost the confidence of some centrist Democrats fearful of facing the wrath of the emboldened liberal activists in the Obama era. But the unions are expressing no remorse in trying to defeat a Democrat. The AFL-CIO and SEIU both issued statements proclaiming that their efforts were a success, even if they didn't win.

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Filed under: 2010 • Politics
June 9th, 2010
07:42 AM ET
5 years ago

Battle lines drawn in Tuesday's primaries

(CNN) - Arkansas Sen. Blanche Lincoln won the Democratic primary Tuesday, beating back a challenge from Lt. Gov. Bill Halter, whose campaign was fueled by unions and liberal activists.

In Nevada, Gov. Jim Gibbons failed to convince Republicans to give him another chance at a four-year term, while a Tea Party-backed candidate won the GOP nod to challenge Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid.

Voters in 12 states held primary elections Tuesday night, but the outcomes of two contests in South Carolina will be delayed by another two weeks. A runoff will be held on June 22 for the Republican gubernatorial nomination as well as for a GOP congressional seat in the northern part of the state.

Listen: CNN Radio runs down the primary results

The Republican gubernatorial contest captured national attention because of accusations of extramarital affairs.

The candidates are vying to succeed scandal-plagued Gov. Mark Sanford, a fellow Republican. A year after Sanford made national news for disappearing and then admitting to an affair with a woman from Argentina, allegations of infidelity surrounded state lawmaker Nikki Haley.

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Filed under: 2010 • Politics
April 5th, 2010
09:16 AM ET
5 years ago

Ballparks locale of choice for campaign fundraisers

When President Obama throws out the first pitch at the Washington Nationals' season opener on Monday, he will kick off not only a new baseball season but also a new round of fundraisers at Nationals Park.
When President Obama throws out the first pitch at the Washington Nationals' season opener on Monday, he will kick off not only a new baseball season but also a new round of fundraisers at Nationals Park.

Washington (CNN) - When President Obama throws out the first pitch at the Washington Nationals' season opener on Monday, he will kick off not only a new baseball season but also a new round of fundraisers at Nationals Park.

Though Obama won't be raising any cash himself on game day, his appearance will be the backdrop for at least one ballpark fundraiser Monday, the first of what Nationals President Stan Kasten hopes will be many political events held at the stadium this season.

Since Nationals Park first opened in March 2008, Kasten has actively encouraged political operatives of all ideological stripes to hold their fundraisers and receptions at the ballpark, as opposed to more conventional venues such as restaurants or hotel ballrooms.

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Filed under: Politics
January 1st, 2010
05:00 PM ET
December 28th, 2009
09:32 AM ET
11 months ago

Cities embrace mobile apps, 'Gov 2.0'

Web tools, mobile technology and GPS applications are giving citizens more of a say in how their local tax money is being spent.
Web tools, mobile technology and GPS applications are giving citizens more of a say in how their local tax money is being spent.

(CNN) - Craig Newmark, founder of Craigslist and a customer-service guru, was riding on a public train in San Francisco, California, recently when something common but annoying occurred: The railcar filled with people and became uncomfortably hot.

If the inconvenience had happened a few years ago, Newmark said he would have just gone on with his day - maybe complaining about the temperature to a friend.

But this was 2009, the age of mobile technology, so Newmark pulled out his iPhone, snapped a photo of the train car and, using an app called "SeeClickFix," zapped an on-the-go complaint, complete with GPS coordinates, straight to City Hall.

"A week or so later I got an e-mail back saying, 'Hey, we know about the problem and we're going to be taking some measures to address it,' " he said.

Full story


Filed under: Politics
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