June 1st, 2008
01:14 PM ET
6 years ago

Schneider: Puerto Rican voters divided

Clinton's supporters in Puerto Rico say they won't be happy if Obama wins the nomination.
Clinton's supporters in Puerto Rico say they won't be happy if Obama wins the nomination.

(CNN) – Puerto Rican voters appear to be as divided as Democrats on the mainland, according to CNN's exclusive exit polls.

Among Hillary Clinton's supporters there, 72 percent said they would not be satisfied if Barack Obama wins the Democratic nomination, while only 26 percent said they would be.

Obama's supporters were slightly more willing to support Clinton, but not very. Nearly 60 percent said they would be dissatisfied if the New York Democrat won the nomination, while only 38 percent said they would be satisfied.

Puerto Ricans are not eligible to vote in the general election.


Filed under: Exit Polls
May 21st, 2008
06:36 AM ET
7 years ago

Obama, Clinton supporters both say Clinton attacking unfairly

Clinton and Obama supporters both said Clinton attacked unfairly.
Clinton and Obama supporters both said Clinton attacked unfairly.

(CNN) - Even in a state Hillary Clinton appears to have won by 35 points, a majority of Kentucky voters say the New York senator attacked Barack Obama unfairly.

According to the exit polls, 54 percent of voters said Clinton launched unfair attacks on Obama, though that didn't seem to deter voters there from supporting Clinton - 55 percent of those who said Clinton attacked unfairly still voted for the New York senator.

Clinton faced a similar statistic in West Virginia last week. There she won by 41 points, but nearly 60 percent of voters said she made unfair attacks against the Illinois senator.


Filed under: Exit Polls
May 20th, 2008
11:14 PM ET
7 years ago

Oregon voters down on gas tax holiday

ALT TEXT

(CNN) – Two of three voters in Oregon's Democratic primary disagree with Hillary Clinton's call for a moratorium in the federal gasoline tax. Twenty-six percent of the voters in CNN's Oregon voter poll, conducted by phone, think suspending the gas tax is a good idea; they went for Clinton over Barack Obama 64 to 34 percent. Sixty-three percent think it's a bad idea to suspend the gas tax - those voters supported Obama 67 to 31 percent.


Filed under: Exit Polls
May 20th, 2008
11:14 PM ET
7 years ago

Schneider: College educated, non-religious voters carry Obama

(CNN) – CNN just predicted Obama will win the Oregon primary. How did the Illinois senator win there so easily?

Obama won overwhelming support from Oregon voters who attended college. Nearly 60 percent of that demographic went for Obama there and those voters made up nearly 80 percent of the demographic.

Obama also won big in another category: among those voters who say they do not have a religion, or have another religion outside of Catholicism, Protestantism, and Judaism.

Nearly 30 percent of Oregon Democrats said they were not religious and those voters went for Obama by 21 percentage points, 60 percent to 39 percent. And among those voters who listed "other" as their religion, a group that made up 10 percent of the vote, Obama won by 42 points, 70 percent to 28 percent.


Filed under: Exit Polls
May 20th, 2008
09:08 PM ET
7 years ago

Schneider: Majority in Kentucky say Obama doesn't share values

(CNN) - In another sign Barack Obama has trouble courting blue-collar voters, less than half of Kentucky Democrats said Tuesday that Barack Obama shares their values.

According to the exit polls, only 43 percent of voters there said Obama shares their values, a statistic that could potentially hurt him in the fall should he win the party's nomination.

That compares to 73 percent of Kentucky Democrats who said Hillary Clinton shares their values – a statistic the Clinton campaign often references when it claims the New York Democrat has a better chance of winning the crucial swing states in a general election.

The numbers were very similar in West Virginia last week. There only 43 percent said Obama shared their values while 70 percent said Clinton did.

Obama clearly has a long way to go in defining himself among these voters should he be the party's nominee.


Filed under: Exit Polls
May 20th, 2008
09:02 PM ET
5 years ago

Schneider: Clinton, Obama win each other's voters

(CNN) – Much has been made about both Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama's entrenched demographics, with each claiming crucial Democratic voting blocs. In primary after primary, it seems like the same coalitions vote for each candidate.

But exit polls out of Kentucky and Oregon Tuesday night show demographics are not necessarily destiny - geography and culture play a large role.

Consider white blue-collar voters, a demographic that is often considered to be Clinton's strongest. In Kentucky, she won 75 percent of these voters, while only 18 percent went for Obama. But in Oregon, exit polls show Clinton and Obama are essentially tied among this demographic: 50 percent supported Clinton, and 47 percent voted for Obama.

And consider voters under 30 - a demographic that usually votes overwhelmingly for Obama. In Oregon he carried these voters by 40 points over Clinton. But in Kentucky, Clinton beat Obama in that demographic by 16 points.


Filed under: Exit Polls
May 20th, 2008
09:01 PM ET
7 years ago

Schneider: Should Clinton be V.P.? Depends who you ask

(CNN) - If Barack Obama wins the Democratic nomination, should he pick Hillary Clinton as his running mate?

Roughly 54 percent of Democratic voters in Kentucky said yes - but supporters of both candidates are sharply divided on whether the New York senator should get the No. 2 spot.

Among Clinton voters in Kentucky, 64 percent said she should be the vice presidential candidate, while 33 percent said she should not.

But Obama supporters are much more against the idea of Clinton claiming the vice presidential slot on the ticket with Obama. Close to 60 percent of them say the Illinois senator should not pick Clinton as his running mate, while only 38 percent think he should.

It's yet another issue where Clinton and Obama supporters are sharply divided.

May 20th, 2008
08:34 PM ET
7 years ago

Exit Polls: Did the Edwards endorsement make a difference?

 Were voters swayed by Edwards' decision to back Obama?
Were voters swayed by Edwards' decision to back Obama?

(CNN) – Is John Edwards' recent endorsement of Barack Obama important? Forty-five percent of the voters in today's Kentucky's Democratic primary think so. But exit polls show they split their vote: 48 percent voted for Obama, and 47 percent for Clinton.

Fifty-two percent of today's voters in Kentucky say Edwards' endorsement of Obama was not important. They went overwhelmingly for Clinton: 81 to 14 percent.

May 20th, 2008
07:55 PM ET
7 years ago

Schneider: Obama not a satisfying choice for KY Democrats

(CNN) - In another sign of the challenge facing Obama among Democratic voters in blue-collar states like Kentucky, only 41 percent of them there said they would be satisfied if he wins the party's nomination.

Among Clinton supporters, the number is even more daunting for Obama: Only 33 percent said they'd be satisfied if the Illinois senator is the nominee.

That compares to 76 percent of Democrats in Kentucky who'd be satisfied if Clinton wins the nomination.

With less than six months until the general election, the Democratic Party has a lot of healing to do.

May 20th, 2008
07:21 PM ET
7 years ago

Schneider: How Clinton won Kentucky

(CNN) - CNN has just predicted a wide margin of victory for Hillary Clinton in Kentucky. How did she win so overwhelmingly there?

The exit polls point to three reasons: Her support among white voters, her support among rural voters, and Barack Obama's controversial formal pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah Wright.

Among whites in Kentucky, who made up 9 in 10 voters, Clinton won 71 percent of the vote while Obama only won 22 percent.

Rural voters also voted overwhelmingly for Clinton. Those voters made up 45 percent of the electorate and nearly 80 percent of them went for Clinton. Among suburban voters, who made up 30 percent of the vote, Clinton won by a narrower 18 point margin. Meanwhile Obama carried urban voters by 18 points, but those voters only made up a little more than 10 percent of the electorate.

There is also evidence Obama's former pastor continues to haunt him. Nearly 55 percent of Democratic voters said Obama shares the most controversial views of Wright and those voters went for Clinton 84 percent to 9 percent over Obama. Among the 44 percent of Kentucky voters who said Obama does not share Wright's views, 51 percent voted for the Illinois senator while 43 percent went for Clinton.


Filed under: Exit Polls • Hillary Clinton • Kentucky
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