September 18th, 2010
11:24 AM ET
4 years ago

GOP address: Stop tax hikes

(CNN) – Rep. Greg Walden, R-Oregon, says Republicans want to stop all the potential tax hikes in the weekly Republican radio and internet address.


Filed under: issues • Republican
September 16th, 2010
03:45 PM ET
4 years ago

Midterm TV ad spending could top $1 billion

Washington (CNN) - Nearly $285 million was spent by Democrats, Republicans and advocacy groups on political television commercials in the 2010 primaries, and when the dust settles on this midterm election, the final tally could reach $1 billion.

Evan Tracey, president of Campaign Media Analysis, notes history shows that three quarters of the money spent on political TV ads occurs in the final 60 days of the campaign.

The debate over health care reform helped influence the number of political commercials aired in this election cycle. Still, the possibility that Republicans have a shot of winning back the House as well as making substantial gains in the Senate has energized what was once a depressed Republican political base just 20 months ago.

Here is a quick snapshot of the spending on commercials in the primary:

House Democrats, parties and allies: $19 million
House Republicans, parties and allies: $33 million
Senate Democrats, parties and allies: $115 million
Senate Republicans, parties and allies: $117 million


Filed under: Democrats • Republican
October 7th, 2009
01:19 PM ET
5 years ago

Toomey raises over $1.5 million for the quarter

Toomey raises over $1.5 million for the quarter.
Toomey raises over $1.5 million for the quarter.

WASHINGTON (CNN)– Republican Senate candidate Pat Toomey - whose looming primary challenge helped drive former GOP Sen. Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania into the Democratic Party - raised over $1.5 million this past quarter, his campaign announced Wednesday.

Toomey has brought in over $3.1 million from over 20,000 contributors since announcing his candidacy in April, according to his campaign.

Specter's edge over Toomey in a hypothetical general election matchup appears to have evaporated: polls released last week show the two in a dead heat.


Filed under: Pat Toomey • Republican
July 7th, 2009
05:30 PM ET
5 years ago

Analysis: Is Palin the next GOP 'kingmaker'?

Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin's decision to step down in late July has rankled both Republicans and Democrats.
Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin's decision to step down in late July has rankled both Republicans and Democrats.

WASHINGTON (CNN) - Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin caught the political world by surprise when she announced that she will resign at the end of July.

Her decision has not only rankled political pundits and observers in Alaska and across the country, it has, oddly enough, united Democrats and Republicans in confusion.

But the 45-year-old governor's future could be aimed at being the ultimate GOP superstar, whether it's giving million-dollar speeches, traveling the lower 48 states on a book tour or even getting her own TV show.

Read More: Virginia and NJ Republicans non-committal on Palin

John Ridley of National Public Radio says she has the potential to be a Republican "kingmaker."

"She was never going to be president of the United States. But who's got all the sway in the Republican Party right now? It's the political pundits; it's the talk show hosts; it's the people who are not responsible to an electorate," Ridley told CNN's Campbell Brown. "I would not be surprised if around 2011 people are circling around Sarah Palin, saying, 'please, anoint us for the road to the White House.' She's never going to be president but possibly a kingmaker."

Full Story


Filed under: Republican • Sarah Palin
June 4th, 2009
05:55 PM ET
5 years ago

GOP chastises Obama's speech over Israeli-Palestinian issue

WASHINGTON (CNN) - President Obama's speech to the Muslim world on Thursday faced mixed reaction abroad - and a very clear directive at home from Republicans and conservatives: The United States cannot ruin its relationship with Israel.

Speaking in Cairo, Egypt, the president took on the heated and controversial Palestinian-Israeli conflict by endorsing a two-state solution and urging compromise between "two peoples with legitimate aspirations."

The United States, he said, "does not accept the legitimacy of continued Israeli settlements."

Those Jewish settlements are spread throughout the Palestinian-controlled West Bank. Israel maintains the settlements are needed, while Palestinians say they are an obstacle to the peace process.

Calling America's "strong bond" with Israel "unbreakable," he said, "It is based upon cultural and historical ties and the recognition that the aspiration for a Jewish homeland is rooted in a tragic history that cannot be denied."

House Minority Leader John Boehner on Thursday blasted Obama's approach to the Israeli-Palestinian question.

"He seemed to ... place equal blame on the Israelis and the Palestinians. I have concerns about this," the Ohio Republican said. "The Israelis have the right to defend themselves."

Boehner's Republican colleague, Rep. Mike Pence of Indiana, added that "there was a sense in here of a moral equivalency between those who are driving for a Palestinian state and the state of Israel."

Full Story


Filed under: President Obama • Republican
May 13th, 2009
04:50 AM ET
5 years ago

Obama Official Expected to be rejected by Senate Wednesday

WASHINGTON (CNN)– The Senate Democratic leadership is preparing to lose a vote Wednesday morning on the confirmation of David Hayes as Deputy Secretary of Interior. If that happens, it would be the first time Congress votes to reject one of President Obama’s nominees.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid’s spokesman Jim Manley tells CNN that Democrats believe Republicans will vote in lockstep to block Hayes’ nomination, and therefore, it will fail.

Republican objections to Hayes appear to have little to do with him or his qualifications, and more to do with an Obama administration policy.

Specifically, Utah Republican Robert Bennett has been leading his party’s opposition to Hayes because of an Obama decision to cancel oil and gas leases in Utah.

“This is not about Hayes,” Bennett spokeswoman Tara Hendershott tells CNN.

She says Bennett is blocking Hayes because the Department of Interior “has not provided any information he requested regarding the Secretary’s unilateral decision to cancel the oil and gas leases.”

If Republicans do successfully block Hayes’ nomination, it will be the starkest illustration yet of what it means for Democrats to have 59 seats – just one shy of a filibuster proof majority – as the Minnesota Senate race remains unresolved.

FULL POST


Filed under: President Obama • Republican
May 12th, 2009
10:51 PM ET
5 years ago

Obama Official Expected to be rejected by Senate Wednesday

WASHINGTON (CNN)– The Senate Democratic leadership is preparing to lose a vote Wednesday morning on the confirmation of David Hayes as Deputy Secretary of Interior. If that happens, it would be the first time Congress votes to reject one of President Obama’s nominees.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid’s spokesman Jim Manley tells CNN that Democrats believe Republicans will vote in lockstep to block Hayes’ nomination, and therefore, it will fail.

Republican objections to Hayes appear to have little to do with him or his qualifications, and more to do with an Obama administration policy.

Specifically, Utah Republican Robert Bennett has been leading his party’s opposition to Hayes because of an Obama decision to cancel oil and gas leases in Utah.

“This is not about Hayes,” Bennett spokeswoman Tara Hendershott tells CNN.

She says Bennett is blocking Hayes because the Department of Interior “has not provided any information he requested regarding the Secretary’s unilateral decision to cancel the oil and gas leases.”

If Republicans do successfully block Hayes’ nomination, it will be the starkest illustration yet of what it means for Democrats to have 59 seats – just one shy of a filibuster proof majority – as the Minnesota Senate race remains unresolved.

FULL POST


Filed under: Extra • President Obama • Republican
April 28th, 2009
01:13 PM ET
5 years ago

Specter says he intends to switch to Democratic party

WASHINGTON (CNN) – Veteran Pennsylvania Sen. Arlen Specter told colleagues Tuesday he intends to switch from the Republican to the Democratic party.

A Specter party switch would give Democrats a filibuster-proof Senate majority of 60 seats if Al Franken holds his current lead in the disputed Minnesota Senate race.

"Since my election in 1980, as part of the Reagan Big Tent, the Republican Party has moved far to the right," Specter said in a written statement posted by his office on the Web site PoliticsPA.com.

"Last year, more than 200,000 Republicans in Pennsylvania changed their registration to become Democrats. I now find my political philosophy more in line with Democrats than Republicans."

Specter, a five-term Senate veteran, was greeted by a loud, sustained round of applause by dozens of constituents outside his Washington office shortly after the news broke.

"I don't have to say anything to them," a smiling Specter said. "They've said it to me."

President Barack Obama called Specter shortly after learning the news during his daily economic briefing in the Oval Office Tuesday morning, according to a senior administration official.

"You have my full support and we're thrilled to have you," Obama told Specter.

Jubilant Senate Democrats also welcomed the news.

"Sen. Specter and I have had a long dialogue about his place in an evolving Republican party," Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nevada, said in a written statement.

"We have not always agreed on every issue, but (he) has shown a willingness to work in a bipartisan manner, put people over party, and do what is right for Pennsylvanians and all Americans."

Reid called Specter a "man of honor and integrity" who would be welcome in the Democratic caucus.

Specter was expected to face a very tough primary challenge next year from former Rep. Pat Toomey, who nearly defeated Specter in the Pennsylvania GOP Senate primary in 2004.

FULL POST


Filed under: Arlen Specter • Republican
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