Reagan to be featured at Rose Parade
December 30th, 2010
08:15 AM ET
3 years ago

Reagan to be featured at Rose Parade

(CNN) –Former President Ronald Reagan will be honored in the 2011 Rose Parade with a specially designed float - the first time that the Rose Parade has ever included a presidential-themed float.

The Rose Parade feature is designed to kick off a celebration events to commemorate the centennial of Reagan's birth. He would have been 100 years old on February 6, 2011.
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Filed under: Ronald Reagan
Obama looks to Reagan
December 24th, 2010
02:11 PM ET
3 years ago

Obama looks to Reagan

(CNN) – President Obama is spending his Hawaiian vacation reading up on a Republican icon.

The president is currently reading a biography of former President Ronald Reagan by Lou Cannon, according to White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs.

Gibbs revealed the president's choice Friday on Twitter during a two hour question-and-answer session.


Filed under: President Obama • Ronald Reagan
Reagan receives centennial stamp
December 13th, 2010
06:37 PM ET
3 years ago

Reagan receives centennial stamp

Washington (CNN) - Former President Ronald Reagan was remembered Monday with a unique birthday gift: his own postage stamp. Reagan's 100th birthday is coming up on February 6th, 2011.

The price of a President Reagan stamp has gone up over the years. The first stamp dedicated to the late president was issued at 37 cents. The new stamp will cost 44 cents, and is expected to become a forever stamp.

The stamp was revealed during a ceremony at the Reagan Library in California that was attended by former first lady Nancy Reagan. James C. Miller, a former member of Reagan's cabinet and current member of the Board of Governors of the U.S. Postal Service, also made remarks.

"With President Reagan, what you saw was what you got: humble, honest, and trustworthy," Miller said. He remembered Reagan as someone who "had extraordinary trust in the goodness and good sense of the American people" and pledged to do everything he can to make Reagan's centennial stamp a forever stamp.

The new stamp, a third dedicated to Reagan, will go on sale in February of 2011.


Filed under: Ronald Reagan
September 22nd, 2010
11:16 AM ET
4 years ago

Reagan-era theme revived for 2010 midterms

The group Citizens for the Republic is out Wednesday with a new ad.
The group Citizens for the Republic is out Wednesday with a new ad.

Washington (CNN) – It was 26 years ago when Republicans proclaimed that it was "Morning In America," to promote the nation's economic turnaround under President Ronald Reagan's watch.

Now, a group of loyal aides and associates to the late president are spinning his 1984 election theme into a new, national commercial called "Mourning In America," in an attempt to highlight the country's economic problems under President Obama's watch.

The 60-second ad is being paid for by Citizens for the Republic, a political operation founded by Reagan in 1977 and put back online by Reagan Attorney General Ed Meese, policy adviser Peter Hannaford, Republican strategists Craig Shirley and Bill Pascoe, among others, who describe themselves as "Reaganites."

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September 20th, 2010
12:26 PM ET
4 years ago

Sailors honor Reagan

ALT TEXT

 Celebrating late President Ronald Reagan's 100th birthday, U.S. Navy sailors mark the occasion on the deck of the aircraft carrier named in his honor. (PHOTO CREDIT: U.S. Navy/ Dylan McCord)


Washington (CNN) - Sailors serving aboard the USS Ronald Reagan paid tribute to the nation's 40th president last week by forming together on the deck of the aircraft carrier to spell out his initials and the number 100 to signify the upcoming anniversary of the late president's centennial birthday.

Reagan, who was born on Feb. 6, 1911, was first elected president in 1980 and again for a second term in 1984. He died on June 5, 2004 at the age of 93. The Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation & Library plans a year long celebration to honor the 40th president on his 100th birthday.


Filed under: Ronald Reagan
September 8th, 2010
08:03 AM ET
4 years ago

Taxes: What people forget about Reagan

What do people forget about Ronald Reagan?
What do people forget about Ronald Reagan?

New York (CNNMoney.com) – Those who oppose higher taxes and are fed up with record levels of U.S. debt may pine for Ronald Reagan, the patron saint of lower taxes and smaller government.

But it's worth considering just what Reagan did - and didn't do - as lawmakers grapple with many of the same issues that their 1980s counterparts faced: a deep recession, high deficits and a rip-roaring political divide over taxes.

Soon after taking office in 1981, Reagan signed into law one of the largest tax cuts in the postwar period.

That legislation - phased in over three years - pushed through a 23% across-the-board cut of individual income tax rates. It also called for tax brackets, the standard deduction and personal exemptions to be adjusted for inflation starting in 1984. That would reduce "bracket creep" since the high inflation of the 1970s and early 1980s meant incomes rose very fast, pushing taxpayers into ever higher brackets even though the real value of their income hadn't changed.

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Filed under: CNNMoney.com • issues • Ronald Reagan • Taxes
March 3rd, 2010
01:01 PM ET
4 years ago

Lawmaker moves to put Reagan on the $50 bill

Could Reagan overtake Grant on the $50?
Could Reagan overtake Grant on the $50?

(CNN) – Should Ulysses S. Grant, the legendary Union general and 18th president of the United States, be bumped from his 96-year stint on the $50 bill?

Yes, according to one North Carolina Republican.

Rep. Patrick McHenry announced that he will introduce a measure that would replace Grant’s face with Ronald Reagan's, just in time for the 40th president's 100th birthday next February.

"President Reagan was a modern day statesman, whose presidency transformed our nation's political and economic thinking," McHenry said in a statement. "Through both his domestic and international policies he renewed America's self confidence, defeated the Soviets and taught us that each generation must provide opportunity for the next."

McHenry says it's only logical for Reagan to replace Grant on the $50 because several historians have ranked Reagan as a much better president than Grant. McHenry specifically cites a 2005 Wall Street Journal survey of scholars who placed Reagan at No. 6 and Grant at No. 29.

"Every generation needs its own heroes," McHenry also said. "One decade into the 21st century, it's time to honor the last great president of the 20th and give President Reagan a place beside Presidents Roosevelt and Kennedy."

Franklin Roosevelt's face currently appears on the dime while John F. Kennedy's image is on the half-dollar.

But not so fast, says Dr. John Marszalek, the executive director and managing editor of the Ulysses S. Grant Association.

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Filed under: Ronald Reagan
February 19th, 2010
06:30 PM ET
4 years ago

Alexander Haig hospitalized

Former Secretary of State Alexander Haig has been admitted to a hospital in Baltimore, Maryland.
Former Secretary of State Alexander Haig has been admitted to a hospital in Baltimore, Maryland.

Washington (CNN) - Former Secretary of State Alexander Haig has been admitted to a hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, a hospital spokesman said.

Haig, 85, is at Johns Hopkins Hospital, said the spokesman, Gary Stephenson.

He was admitted on January 28 and is in critical condition, Stephenson said.

Haig was a top official in the administrations of three presidents - Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, and Ronald Reagan.

He served as Nixon's deputy assistant for national security affairs beginning in 1970, then in January 1973 became vice chief of staff of the Army.

"His departure from the Nixon administration proved to be short lived," the Nixon Presidential Library and Museum Web site says in a biographical note on Haig. "Four months later, on May 4, 1973, he returned to the White House as chief of staff at the request of the president to fill the vacuum created by H.R. Haldeman's resignation on April 30."

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Filed under: Popular Posts • Ronald Reagan
February 11th, 2010
04:50 AM ET
4 years ago

Reagan brothers spar over dad's view of Tea Party movement

Brothers Michael Reagan, left, and Ron Reagan, right, are disagreeing about how their father, the former president, would have viewed the Tea Party movement.
Brothers Michael Reagan, left, and Ron Reagan, right, are disagreeing about how their father, the former president, would have viewed the Tea Party movement.

Washington (CNN) - Don't invite the late President Ronald Reagan's two sons over for a tea party, much less a beer.

Well, maybe a beer, kind of like President Obama's "beer summit" last summer at the White House. That might be needed.

The brothers Reagan, Ron and Michael, don't agree on how their dad – often described as the father of the modern day conservatism – would view the Tea Party movement.

Ron, a liberal, told HLN's Joy Behar that he didn't think his father would embrace the Tea Party movement and its activists.

"I think he would be unamused by the TEA partiers with their Hitler signs and all the rest of it," Ron Reagan said in the January 26 interview on CNN's sister network. "No, I don't think he'd be cottoning to that much at all. As much as we're wringing our hands about the Democratic Party though and it's all well that we do that, we have to remember that the alternative, the Republicans are a true train wreck – a train wreck. Look at Sarah Palin. Look at Scott Brown. You know."

Michael fired back at his brother on Wednesday, saying he has a better understanding of their father's political thinking, after all he holds the same conservative views.

"In 1976 and 1980, and throughout his presidency, President Reagan worked tirelessly to build the conservative movement and the Republican Party through the grassroots," Michael Reagan said in a statement. "He knew what it took to build a movement.

"Unlike my brother, I campaigned with and for my father in 1976 and in 1980 – and I feel more qualified to say what he would and would not have supported. He would be applauding the grassroots organization of this country and Sarah Palin for making herself available to elect conservative candidates."

So much for brotherly love.


Filed under: Ronald Reagan • Tea Party movement
February 10th, 2010
06:58 PM ET
4 years ago

Reagan brothers spar over dad's view of Tea Party movement

Brothers Michael Reagan, left, and Ron Reagan, right, are disagreeing about how their father, the former president, would have viewed the Tea Party movement.
Brothers Michael Reagan, left, and Ron Reagan, right, are disagreeing about how their father, the former president, would have viewed the Tea Party movement.

Washington (CNN) - Don't invite the late President Ronald Reagan's two sons over for a tea party, much less a beer.

Well, maybe a beer, kind of like President Obama's "beer summit" last summer at the White House. That might be needed.

The brothers Reagan, Ron and Michael, don't agree on how their dad – often described as the father of the modern day conservatism – would view the Tea Party movement.

Ron, a liberal, told HLN's Joy Behar that he didn't think his father would embrace the Tea Party movement and its activists.

"I think he would be unamused by the TEA partiers with their Hitler signs and all the rest of it," Ron Reagan said in the January 26 interview on CNN's sister network. "No, I don't think he'd be cottoning to that much at all. As much as we're wringing our hands about the Democratic Party though and it's all well that we do that, we have to remember that the alternative, the Republicans are a true train wreck – a train wreck. Look at Sarah Palin. Look at Scott Brown. You know."

Michael fired back at his brother on Wednesday, saying he has a better understanding of their father's political thinking, after all he holds the same conservative views.
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Filed under: Extra • Popular Posts • Ronald Reagan • Tea Party movement
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