GOP: Look to the states
April 6th, 2013
06:00 AM ET
1 year ago

GOP: Look to the states

(CNN) - It's all but certain the Republican-backed budget won't be adopted for the federal government this year, so the GOP governor of Kansas pointed Saturday to a place the party can make change: at the state level.

Gov. Sam Brownback explained in the party's weekly address, "the ideas on how to fix the federal government are now percolating in the states, 30 of which are led by Republican governors.
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Filed under: Kansas • Sam Brownback
Kansas governor apologizes for 'overreaction' to teen's disparaging tweet
November 28th, 2011
02:13 PM ET
3 years ago

Kansas governor apologizes for 'overreaction' to teen's disparaging tweet

(CNN) – Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback apologized Monday for what he called his staff's "overreaction" to a disparaging tweet directed at him by a high school senior during a state Capitol visit.

Emma Sullivan, 18, said late Sunday that she would not write an apology letter to the governor - as her principal had requested - that was due Monday.

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Filed under: Kansas • Sam Brownback
Brownback backs Perry
September 22nd, 2011
11:32 AM ET
3 years ago

Brownback backs Perry

(CNN) - Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback threw his backing behind Republican presidential candidate Rick Perry Thursday.

In a press release from Team Perry, Brownback said the Texas governor is the "right leader for this moment in history."
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Filed under: 2012 • Rick Perry • Sam Brownback
November 11th, 2009
05:03 AM ET
5 years ago

Senators seek to limit congressional service

'Americans know real change in Washington will never happen until we end the era of permanent politicians,' Sen. Jim DeMint said in a statement.
'Americans know real change in Washington will never happen until we end the era of permanent politicians,' Sen. Jim DeMint said in a statement.

Washington (CNN) - A handful of Republican senators have proposed a Constitutional amendment to limit the amount of time a person may serve in Congress.

Currently, there are no term limits for federal lawmakers, but Sen. Jim DeMint, R-South Carolina, and several of his colleagues are advocating that service in the Senate be limited to 12 years, while lawmakers would only be allowed to serve 6 years in the House.

"Americans know real change in Washington will never happen until we end the era of permanent politicians," DeMint said in a statement released by his office. "As long as members have the chance to spend their lives in Washington, their interests will always skew toward spending taxpayer dollars to buyoff special interests, covering over corruption in the bureaucracy, fundraising, relationship building among lobbyists, and trading favors for pork – in short, amassing their own power."

Two-thirds of the House and Senate would need to approve the amendment - a stumbling block that short-circuited the idea 14 years ago. The new proposal echoes the Citizen Legislature Act, part of the original Contract with America proposed by Republicans before they won control of Congress in 1994. That measure, which would have allowed both senators and members of the House to serve just 12 years, won a majority in the Republican-controlled House in 1995, but failed because it did not meet the constitutionally-required two-thirds threshold.
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Filed under: Congress • GOP • Jim DeMint • Kay Bailey Hutchison • Sam Brownback • Tom Coburn
November 10th, 2009
07:59 PM ET
5 years ago

Senators seek to limit congressional service

'Americans know real change in Washington will never happen until we end the era of permanent politicians,' Sen. Jim DeMint said in a statement.
'Americans know real change in Washington will never happen until we end the era of permanent politicians,' Sen. Jim DeMint said in a statement.

Washington (CNN) - A handful of Republican senators have proposed a Constitutional amendment to limit the amount of time a person may serve in Congress.

Currently, there are no term limits for federal lawmakers, but Sen. Jim DeMint, R-South Carolina, and several of his colleagues are advocating that service in the Senate be limited to 12 years, while lawmakers would only be allowed to serve 6 years in the House.

"Americans know real change in Washington will never happen until we end the era of permanent politicians," DeMint said in a statement released by his office. "As long as members have the chance to spend their lives in Washington, their interests will always skew toward spending taxpayer dollars to buyoff special interests, covering over corruption in the bureaucracy, fundraising, relationship building among lobbyists, and trading favors for pork – in short, amassing their own power."

Two-thirds of the House and Senate would need to approve the amendment - a stumbling block that short-circuited the idea 14 years ago. The new proposal echoes the Citizen Legislature Act, part of the original Contract with America proposed by Republicans before they won control of Congress in 1994. That measure, which would have allowed both senators and members of the House to serve just 12 years, won a majority in the Republican-controlled House in 1995, but failed because it did not meet the constitutionally-required two-thirds threshold.
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Filed under: Congress • Extra • GOP • Jim DeMint • Kay Bailey Hutchison • Sam Brownback • Tom Coburn
April 30th, 2009
04:06 PM ET
11 months ago

Gates: Military strike on Iran's nuclear program won't work

 Gates and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton spoke before a Senate panel.
Gates and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton spoke before a Senate panel.

WASHINGTON (CNN) – Defense Secretary Robert Gates said Thursday a military strike on Iran's nuclear program would not stop that country from pursuing the development of a nuclear weapon.

Gates told a Senate panel that a military option would only delay Iran's nuclear ambitions and drive the program further underground, making it more difficult to monitor, he said.

He said the better option would be for the United States and its allies to convince Iran that building a nuclear program would start an arms race that would leave the country less secure.

"Their security interests are actually badly served by trying to have nuclear weapons," Gates said. "They will start a nuclear arms race in the Middle East and they will be less secure at the end than they are now."

Gates was joined by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in an appearance before the Senate Appropriations Committee to discuss the 2009 supplemental request.

Clinton and Gates told the panel the United States and its allies should pressure Iran with tougher sanctions.

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Filed under: Hillary Clinton • Iran • Robert Gates • Sam Brownback
April 28th, 2009
12:35 PM ET
5 years ago

Brownback 'stunned' by Specter switch

WASHINGTON (CNN) – Sen. Sam Brownback of Kansas told CNN he is "stunned" by the news that Arlen Specter is switching parties.

Walking into emergency meeting of GOP Senators, Brownback stopped to read his BlackBerry and his mouth dropped.

"Arlen's his own man, but it's not good," he said.

"I'm just stunned, just heard about it here," Brownback said, motioning to his BlackBerry. "I'm very surprised. I had no idea it was coming."


Filed under: Sam Brownback
December 17th, 2008
02:05 PM ET
6 years ago

Second GOP senator to announce retirement

Brownback will not run for re-election.
Brownback will not run for re-election.

WASHINGTON (CNN) – Sen. Sam Brownback will announce Thursday he is retiring from the Senate when his term ends in 2010, allowing the Kansas Republican to explore a run for governor.

He will be the second GOP senator this year to publicly state he is leaving at the close of the 111th Congress.

Brownback, who unsuccessfully sought the 2008 GOP presidential nomination, will not reveal his future political plans during the three news conferences planned for Thursday in Kansas. But a source close to Brownback said he will file gubernatorial paperwork in January.

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Filed under: Kansas • Sam Brownback
November 9th, 2007
01:19 PM ET
7 years ago

McCain: Brownback has 'far more impact' than Pat Robertson

Sens. McCain and Brownback shake hands at the press conference announcing Brownback's endorsement.

CONCORD, New Hampshire (CNN) – As the Republican field battles for the support of social conservative leaders, Arizona Sen. John McCain told reporters Friday that Kansas Sen. Sam Brownback's endorsement would have "far more impact" than evangelical leader, Pat Robertson's decision to back former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani.

Aboard his "Straight Talk Express," McCain called Giuliani's endorsement by the Christian Coalition founder a "stunning event," but added that in the social conservative community, Browback's backing would carry more weight. McCain pointed to the pro-life and pro-values communities where Brownback was "highly regarded."

Robertson's endorsement shocked many in the evangelical community given Giuliani's support for abortion and gay rights. Despite such differences, Robertson said he decided to endorse the former New York mayor because he was a "proven leader who is not afraid of what lies ahead and who will cast a hopeful vision for all Americans."

While the Giuliani camp hopes the backing of a prominent social conservative will help him build support with evangelical Christians, McCain is also vying for the same bloc of voters. McCain noted that he had already felt a lift since his Brownback endorsement with key Brownback campaign staffers and supporters coming on board.

– CNN New Hampshire Producer Sareena Dalla


Filed under: John McCain • Sam Brownback
November 7th, 2007
01:34 PM ET
7 years ago

Brownback gets behind McCain

Brownback endorsed McCain Wednesday in Iowa.

DUBUQUE, Iowa (CNN) - Republican presidential candidate John McCain won the backing of Kansas Sen. Sam Brownback Wednesday, an endorsement that could help the Arizona senator draw support among social conservatives .

"I am endorsing the best pro-life candidate to beat Hillary Clinton," Brownback, who abandoned his own White House bid last month, said in a press conference in Dubuque.

"Here is a pro-life leader who will appoint strict-constructionist judges so that I believe we can end this night of wrong and have Roe v. Wade overturned," Brownback continued.

McCain, who hovers around fourth place in many recent polls in this crucial early-caucus state, hailed the endorsement as "significant"

"There are endorsements and then there are endorsements, support and different kinds of support," he said. "This time the support comes from one of the most respected men in America."

The endorsement comes nearly a month after Brownback ended his own presidential bid after lackluster fundraising and poor showings in both the national and crucial early primary and caucus state polls.

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Filed under: Iowa • John McCain • Sam Brownback
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