April 22nd, 2008
09:26 PM ET
6 years ago

Schneider responds to some of your comments

(CNN)— CNN Senior Political Analyst Bill Schneider was busy reporting exit polls for Tuesday night’s broadcast, and providing analysis for the Political Ticker – and he also took the time to respond to some of your comments here.


Filed under: Schneider analysis
March 4th, 2008
10:41 PM ET
6 years ago

Schneider: Some troubling results for McCain

(CNN) - John McCain clinched the Republican nomination tonight with big wins in Texas and Ohio.

But looking at the exit polls out of Texas - a state McCain must carry in the general election to win the presidency - trouble remains for the Arizona senator.

Despite the fact McCain is certain to carry his party's banner in the general election, he only narrowly carried Texas conservatives over Huckabee (48-40 percent). They made up more than two-thirds of all Texas Republican voters, and it is imperative they show up to vote for McCain in November. Also, McCain only managed to tie Huckabee among late deciders, another indication many Republicans aren't ready to rally behind McCain.

Another troubling statistic: More Texas Republican voters said they were looking for a candidate that shares their values over any other quality - and those voters picked Huckabee by 25 points over McCain (57-32 percent).

Translation: McCain captured his party's nomination tonight, but he still has a lot of work ahead of him to convince the base he's their guy.

Related: Watch McCain speak to supporters about being the Republican nominee

–CNN's Senior Political Analyst Bill Schneider


Filed under: John McCain • Schneider analysis
February 5th, 2008
11:42 PM ET
6 years ago

Schneider: Huckabee's conservative support doesn't extend past the South

(CNN) – Mike Huckabee has clearly done well tonight, largely thanks to Southern conservatives. But a closer look into the exit polls show the former Arkansas governor's conservative support largely evaporates beyond the South.

According to our exit polls, Huckabee beat Romney among all Southern conservatives, 41 percent to 28 percent. McCain came in third among Southern conservatives, with 25 percent.

But beyond the Southern states, Huckabee falls into a distant third for conservative support. Among non-Southern conservatives, Romney beats McCain, 44 percent to 33 percent. Huckabee is all the way back at 16 percent.

Translation: Huckabee is a regional candidate.

– CNN Senior Political Analyst Bill Schneider


Filed under: Schneider analysis
January 31st, 2008
09:50 PM ET
6 years ago

Schneider: Clinton tackles the First Spouse issue

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Former President Clinton campaigned for his wife in New Jersey recently. (Photo Credit: Getty Images)

Hollywood loves the core of Obama’s answer on the sex and violence in media issue: don’t blame producers, blame the parents. He doesn’t let them off the hook, but he does argue their case somewhat.

Meanwhile, Clinton’s having trouble with a tougher question – and a unique problem for her. Obama doesn’t have to deal with the specter of a former president in the White House alongside the new commander-in-chief. There’s a lot of evasiveness in her response.

Related: Hillary Clinton says she's running for president–not Bill

– CNN Senior Political Analyst Bill Schneider


Filed under: Schneider analysis
January 21st, 2008
10:37 PM ET
2 years ago

Schneider: Some final thoughts – two different strategies

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Which strategy do you think will be more successful? (Photo Credit: Getty Images)

MYRTLE BEACH, South Carolina (CNN) – Here’s some quick post-debate thoughts:

John Edwards got himself back in it - he showcased his style and his key issues, and is clearly back in the game. He showed he continues to deserve to share a debate stage with Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama, and voters here will likely give him another look after tonight.

The debate showcased the remarkably different primary strategies of Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama. She's going for the partisans that have historically constituted the overwhelming majority of primary voters. This is clear over and over again in her language, every time she talks about "fighting Republicans."

Obama, on the other hand, talks a very different game - he repeatedly said tonight he can forge consensus, and will work with Republicans.

Clinton's strategy of going for the partisans in the primaries has shown itself to be a winning one time and again. But this election season has been anything but normal - and it's possible that after eight years with one of the most partisan presidents in history, even partisan Democrats want a consensus builder.

Clinton is running as the anti-Bush, while Obama is running as the un-Bush. Which will primary voters prefer?


– CNN Senior Political Analyst Bill Schneider

Filed under: Schneider analysis
January 21st, 2008
10:09 PM ET
6 years ago

Schneider: Second half of debate calmer, better

MYRTLE BEACH, South Carolina (CNN) - I enjoyed the second half of this debate considerably more than the first. The different format - they were all seated in chairs - facilitated more of a conversation on the issues. It lacked the fireworks of the first half, but it touched on issues Americans actually care about.

Related: Watch Clinton and Edwards discuss their 'fundamental differences'

– CNN Senior Political Analyst Bill Schneider


Filed under: Schneider analysis
January 21st, 2008
09:23 PM ET
6 years ago

Schneider: First half recap

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What do you think of the first half of the debate? (Photo Credit: Getty Images)

MYRTLE BEACH, South Carolina (CNN) - The first half of the debate is over - here's a few observations:

Obama was largely on the defensive for the debate's entirety. It's a role he's unaccustomed to, and at times he looked shaky and off his game - especially on the health care debate when both Hillary Clinton and John Edwards hammered him on not mandating coverage for everybody.

But he ended on a high note on one of his key issues: Iraq. He brought home the costs in a much more effective way than the other two candidates.

Clinton looked strong on health care - she made clear she's been through the fight before, and spoke authoritatively on how to healthcare passed. But her early squabbles with Obama may have turned viewers off immediately. It's unclear if she was able to win them back.

Edwards was strong throughout, though he's still struggling to be heard over Clinton and Obama. He appeared to take the high road when both of them got bogged down in petty back and forth, and seemed to successfully sharpen his differences with Obama. Viewers will likely give him a second look.

Related: Watch the candidates debate health care

– CNN Senior Political Analyst Bill Schneider


Filed under: Schneider analysis
January 8th, 2008
10:00 PM ET
6 years ago

Schneider: New Hampshire Democrats still love Bill Clinton

(CNN) - Former President Bill Clinton continues to be a wildly popular figure among New Hampshire Democratic primary voters, according to CNN exit polls. Eighty-three percent said they had a favorable rating of the former president while 73 percent said the same about his wife, Sen. Hillary Clinton.

Clinton has a storied history with the Granite State. It was New Hampshire voters in 1992 who handed Clinton a second-place victory when his campaign seemed all-but-doomed, leading the then-Arkansas governor to declare himself the "comeback kid."

But New Hampshire voters like Barack Obama just as much as they like the former president - they gave him an 84 percent favorability rating, a statistical tie with Bill Clinton.

– CNN Senior Political Analyst Bill Schneider


Filed under: Bill Clinton • Schneider analysis
January 8th, 2008
08:33 PM ET
6 years ago

Schneider: Independents propel McCain to victory…again

(CNN) - Just as in the 2000 New Hampshire primary, independent voters in the Republican primary overwhelmingly voted for Arizona Sen. John McCain. McCain attracted 38 percent of the independent vote, compared to 16 percent of independents who went to Romney.

And while the Romney campaign was banking on beating McCain among registered Republicans, CNN exit polling shows the two men roughly split the vote: 34 percent went for McCain and 33 percent went for Romney.

– CNN Senior Political Analyst Bill Schneider


Filed under: John McCain • New Hampshire • Schneider analysis
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