September 12th, 2010
09:52 AM ET
4 years ago

Napolitano: U.S. will never be 'totally immune' from terrorism

(CNN) – Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said on Sunday that the United States is “never going to be totally immune from threats” to its national security.

One day after the ninth anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, Napolitano said in an interview with CNN’s Candy Crowley on "State of the Union" that the country is safer now than it was then, but added, “there is no 100 percent guarantee” that we won’t be attacked again.

Former Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff echoed Napolitano’s assessment.

“We have reduced the risk, we have not eliminated the risk,” Chertoff told Crowley on Sunday.

Napolitano said a small number of American citizens have become “radicalized to violence,” but said that it is “not unique” to the United States, “nor was it unanticipated that that could occur.”

September 9th, 2010
03:11 PM ET
4 years ago

Poll: Bin Laden will never be caught, most Americans say

 A CNN/Opinion Research Corporation survey released Thursday reveals that only 36 percent think the country is safer from terrorism than it was before the 2001 attacks.
A CNN/Opinion Research Corporation survey released Thursday reveals that only 36 percent think the country is safer from terrorism than it was before the 2001 attacks.

Washington (CNN) - Nearly nine years after the September 11 terror attacks, a record number of Americans believe the United States is unlikely to ever capture or kill Osama bin Laden, according to a new national poll.

A CNN/Opinion Research Corporation survey released Thursday reveals that only 36 percent think the country is safer from terrorism than it was before the 2001 attacks.

Full results [pdf]

Nearly two-thirds of Americans, however, are not personally worried about becoming a victim of terrorism. And most say they are prepared to deal with an attack if the worst should happen.

While the federal government has given no indication that it has stopped its pursuit of the man behind the September 11 attacks, only 30 percent of Americans now believe it is likely the U.S. government will ever capture or kill bin Laden. Sixty-seven percent believe it is unlikely.

Full story


Filed under: CNN Polls • issues • Terrorism
August 13th, 2010
05:34 PM ET
4 years ago

Napolitano: GOP congressman's claim is 'so off the mark'

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said Friday that the idea of 'terror babies' infiltrating the United States is 'off the mark.'
Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said Friday that the idea of 'terror babies' infiltrating the United States is 'off the mark.'

Washington (CNN) – Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano said Friday that Texas Rep. Louie Gohmert "is so off the mark" in his assertion that terrorists are plotting to conceive babies in the United States so they can grow up to kill Americans.

The Republican congressman first made the claim on June 24, while discussing on the House floor what he felt were serious gaps in our border enforcement.

"They [terrorists] would have young women who became pregnant, would get them into the United States to have a baby-they wouldn't even have to pay anything for the baby-and then they would return back where they could be raised and coddled as future terrorists," Gohmert said. "And then one day, 20, 30 years down the road, they could be sent in to help destroy our way of life."

Related video: Anderson Cooper and Louie Gohmert debate 'terror babies'

Napolitano, in a Friday interview on CNN's The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer, said that she has seen no evidence of such a plot.

Watch the full interview after the jump
FULL POST


Filed under: Immigration • issues • Janet Napolitano • Louie Gohmert • Terrorism
July 20th, 2010
07:32 AM ET
4 years ago

Report: Tab for 'War on terrorism' tops $1 trillion

ALT TEXT Workers continue construction on the World Trade Center site in July 15, 2010 New York City. (PHOTO CREDIT: Getty Images)

Washington (CNN) - The United States has spent more than $1 trillion on wars since the September 11, 2001, terror attacks, a recently released Congressional report says.

Adjusting for inflation, the outlays for conflicts in Afghanistan, Iraq and elsewhere around the world make the "war on terrorism" second only to World War II.

The report "Cost of Major U.S. Wars" by the Congressional Research Service attempts to compare war costs over a more than 230-year period - from the American Revolution to the current day - noting the difficulties associated with such a task.

Since the the 9/11 terror attacks, the United States has spent an estimated $1.15 trillion. World War II cost $4.1 trillion when converted to current dollars, although the tab in the 1940s was $296 billion.

Full story


Filed under: 9/11 • issues • Terrorism
July 19th, 2010
11:29 AM ET
4 years ago

Senators request meeting with British PM over Lockerbie case

Washington (CNN) - Four U.S. senators have requested a formal meeting with British Prime Minister David Cameron during his visit to the United States this week to discuss the 2009 release of a man convicted of playing a role in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland.

The 1988 bombing killed 270 people, most of them Americans.

The Scottish government released Abdelbaset Ali Mohmed al-Megrahi on compassionate grounds last August after doctors said he had terminal prostate cancer and just three months to live. But al-Megrahi is still alive, and news reports in recent days have questioned whether he was as sick as depicted. Questions also have been raised about whether a deal was cut to release him to protect British business interests in Libya.

Full story

July 13th, 2010
07:32 AM ET
4 years ago

Senators question if BP played role in Pan Am bomber's release

Convicted Pan Am bomber Abdelbaset al Megrahi boards a plane in Scotland to make his final trip home to Libya on August 20.
Convicted Pan Am bomber Abdelbaset al Megrahi boards a plane in Scotland to make his final trip home to Libya on August 20.

(CNN) – A group of U.S. lawmakers have called for an investigation into whether BP may have played a role in lobbying for the release of Abdelbaset al Megrahi to secure an oil contract with the Libyan government.

Megrahi, now 58, was convicted and sentenced to life in prison for the 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 which killed 270 people, including 189 Americans.

He was released from a Scottish prison on compassionate grounds in August after he was diagnosed with prostate cancer.

"Reports have surfaced indicating that a 2007 oil agreement may have influenced the U.K. and Scottish governments' positions concerning Mr. Megrahi's release in 2009," wrote Democratic Sen. Frank Lautenberg of New Jersey in a letter to the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations on Monday.

Full story


Filed under: BP • Terrorism
June 21st, 2010
10:35 AM ET
4 years ago

Supreme Court rules for government on terrorist provision

The 6-3 ruling preserves a key provision of the 2001 Patriot Act.
The 6-3 ruling preserves a key provision of the 2001 Patriot Act.

Washington (CNN) - A divided Supreme Court has ruled the government's power to criminalize "material support" of a terrorist organization is constitutionally permissible.

The 6-3 ruling preserves a key provision of the 2001 Patriot Act, amid claims it threatens the free-speech rights of Americans who would assist non-violent activities of certain militant and terror groups.

At issue was whether the federal law allows prosecution of those with knowledge of "any service, training, expert advice or assistance" to a foreign terrorist organization, as designated by the U.S. government.

Full Story:


Filed under: Supreme Court • Terrorism
June 3rd, 2010
10:35 AM ET
4 years ago

Bush: No regrets for waterboarding

Former President George W. Bush said Wednesday he has no regrets about authorizing the controversial waterboarding technique to interrogate terrorist suspects.
Former President George W. Bush said Wednesday he has no regrets about authorizing the controversial waterboarding technique to interrogate terrorist suspects.

(CNN) - In some of his most candid comments since leaving the White House, former President George W. Bush said Wednesday he has no regrets about authorizing the controversial waterboarding technique to interrogate terrorist suspects and wouldn't hesitate to do so again.

"Yeah, we waterboarded Khalid Sheikh Mohammed," the former president said during an appearance at the Economic Club of Grand Rapids, Michigan, according to the Grand Rapids Press.

"I'd do it again to save lives," he added.

In a question-and-answer session following his speech to the group of local business leaders, the former president also defended his 2003 decision to invade Iraq.

FULL POST


Filed under: George W. Bush • Homeland Security • Popular Posts • Terrorism
May 28th, 2010
06:00 AM ET
May 28th, 2010
05:30 AM ET
4 years ago

CNN Poll: Fear of terrorist attack in U.S. rises

Washington (CNN) – For the first time in nearly four years, a majority of Americans think that a terrorist attack is likely to occur somewhere in the United States in the next few weeks, according to a new national poll.

But a CNN/Opinion Research Corporation survey released Friday morning indicates only one in 20 Americans think that terrorism is the most important problem facing the country today.

Fifty-five percent of people questioned say an act of terrorism in the U.S. over the next few weeks is likely, up 21 points from last August. Forty-three percent said such an attack is not likely, down 21 points from August.

Full results (pdf)

"Eight in ten Americans don't think that a terrorist attack is likely in their community, but the 17 percent who do worry about being targeted by terrorists is the highest that number has been since 2002," says CNN Polling Director Keating Holland. "Nonetheless, terrorism ranks dead last when Americans are asked to name the country's most important problem."

The economy, at 45 percent, tops the list, with the deficit, at 12 percent, and health care, at 11 percent, the only other issues in double digits. Only four percent of those questioned in the poll say terrorism is the country's top issue.

FULL POST


Filed under: CNN poll • Economy • Popular Posts • Terrorism
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