Republicans block another nominee to the D.C. Circuit
November 12th, 2013
07:07 PM ET
8 months ago

Republicans block another nominee to the D.C. Circuit

Washington (CNN) - Senate Republicans Tuesday blocked the President's second nominee in two weeks to be a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. circuit in continuing the persistent and partisan battle over presidential nominations.

Republicans scuttled the nomination of Georgetown Law School professor Nina Pillard on a largely party line vote just as they blocked Patricia Millett 12 days ago. GOP senators argued the D.C. Circuit has enough judges to handle its caseload and President Obama should nominate judges for other courts that need additional help.
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Filed under: Senate • U.S. Court of Appeals
Obama to name three to influential court
June 3rd, 2013
11:19 PM ET
1 year ago

Obama to name three to influential court

(CNN) - President Barack Obama is set to put forward three nominations for the influential United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia on Tuesday, officials told CNN.

The officials, speaking anonymously since the announcement has not yet happened, said the president will nominate attorney Patricia Millett, law professor Cornelia "Nina" Pillard, and U.S. District Judge Robert L. Wilkins to the court, which is often regarded as the second most important judicial panel in the country after the United States Supreme Court.
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GOP senators filibuster D.C. Appeals Court nominee
December 6th, 2011
02:46 PM ET
3 years ago

GOP senators filibuster D.C. Appeals Court nominee

Washington (CNN) – Senate Republicans voted Tuesday to filibuster President Barack Obama's nominee to fill a seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, because they complained she is too liberal and would be an activist on the bench.

The largely party-line vote was 54 to 45, falling shy of the required 60-vote threshold to end the cloture stalemate and allow a final vote on the nomination itself.

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Filed under: Senate • U.S. Court of Appeals
Federal appeals judges show support for health care reform law
May 10th, 2011
01:37 PM ET
3 years ago

Federal appeals judges show support for health care reform law

Richmond, Virginia (CNN) - A federal appeals court panel expressed strong support Tuesday for the sweeping health care reform bill championed by President Barack Obama. It was the first appellate hearing on the law's constitutionality.

The cases are a certain prelude to eventual Supreme Court review.

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Filed under: Health care • U.S. Court of Appeals
Appeals court lifts ban on federal funding for stem cell research
Assistant Professor of Genetics and Developmental Biology Stormy Chamberlain holds a tray of stem cells at the University of Connecticut`s Stem Cell Institute at the UConn Health Center on August 27, 2010 in Farmington, Connecticut.
April 29th, 2011
12:14 PM ET
3 years ago

Appeals court lifts ban on federal funding for stem cell research

Washington (CNN) - A federal court has given the Obama administration the go-ahead to continue funding embryonic stem cell research.

The controversial 2-1 decision Friday is a victory for supporters of federally-funded testing for a range of diseases and illnesses.

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August 18th, 2010
05:22 PM ET
4 years ago

Federal appeals court says highways crosses are unconstitutional

Washington (CNN) – Memorial crosses erected along Utah public roads to honor fallen state highway troopers have been found unconstitutional by a federal appeals court.

A three-judge panel of the 10th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals ruled Wednesday that the 14 large crosses would be viewed by most passing motorists as "government's endorsement of Christianity."

"We hold that these memorials have the impermissible effect of conveying to the reasonable observer the message that the state prefers or otherwise endorses a certain religion," concluded the Denver, Colorado-based court. The state of Utah and a private trooper association have the option of appealing to the U.S. Supreme Court.

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Filed under: Religion • U.S. Court of Appeals