November 12th, 2012
05:02 PM ET
2 years ago

When history speaks: Lincoln's three lessons for an Obama second term

(CNN) – Critics are already gushing over Steven Spielberg's new "Lincoln" as a potential Oscar contender. Much of the praise centers on how the film makes the larger-than-life president at once heroic and human.

By all accounts, it deftly explores both his personal and political wisdom through scenes like the one in which Daniel Day Lewis, who plays Honest Abe, cites ancient mathematical theory in an assessment of humanity: "It's a self-evident truth that things that are equal to the same thing are equal to each other."

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Filed under: President Obama
Margin of error: Two candidates, two journeys, one race of lost dreams
November 4th, 2012
12:06 PM ET
2 years ago

Margin of error: Two candidates, two journeys, one race of lost dreams

Washington (CNN) – When the race is done, the balloons have wilted, and the confetti has been swept up, Campaign 2012 may be marked more by its failures than its triumphs.

But here's the starkest failure in these final days before the vote: Neither candidate has made a convincing enough argument for his presidency to break free of the margin of error in the polls.

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Filed under: 2012 • Mitt Romney • President Obama
October 4th, 2012
12:07 AM ET
2 years ago

Fact Check: Job creation versus unemployment

(CNN) – No issue has been hotter throughout the run-up to the election than jobs - and both candidates took pains to tackle the issue during their first debate Wednesday at the University of Denver.

"Over the last 30 months, we've seen 5 million jobs in the private sector created," Democratic incumbent Barack Obama said.

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Filed under: 2012 • Economy • Jobs • Presidential Debates
Obama's race problem is black and white - and green
September 29th, 2011
01:30 PM ET
3 years ago

Obama's race problem is black and white - and green

Washington (CNN) - Even as he charges into his re-election battle, President Barack Obama has a festering weakness on a flank that, by all accounts, ought to be rock solid: the one held by African-American Democrats. Their support for his programs, belief in his leadership and enthusiasm for another term is softening just as he needs it most.

In the past few weeks, the president has been chastised by the Congressional Black Caucus for avoiding troubled inner-city districts, peppered with tough questions on BET, and suffered plummeting poll numbers among black voters.

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