November 4th, 2008
10:49 PM ET
5 years ago

Schneider: Latinos fleeing GOP

Francisco Lopez puts up campaign signs outside a polling place in a Phoenix suburb Tuesday.
Francisco Lopez puts up campaign signs outside a polling place in a Phoenix suburb Tuesday.

(CNN) - Latino voters are increasingly fleeing the Republican Party, exit polls show.

Two-thirds of Latino voters nationwide voted for Barack Obama, while 30 percent picked John McCain. In 2004, President Bush captured 40 percent of the Latino vote.

Watch: Latinos flock toward Obama

The advantage could prove particularly decisive in Arizona and Florida, two states CNN has yet to call. Even in McCain's home state, 61 percent of Latinos voted against him. In Florida, where Latinos picked Bush over Sen. John Kerry in 2004, Obama is carrying 57 percent of the vote.

The reason Obama is doing so well with Latinos is because they appear to disapprove of Bush's job performance more than the rest of the country. About 80 percent give the president negative marks, while 72 percent of all Americans do.


Filed under: GOP
November 4th, 2008
10:14 PM ET
5 years ago

Schneider: Bush dashes McCain's Ohio hopes

(CNN) - President Bush, who was able to carry Ohio twice, most certainly stopped John McCain from doing so.

More than 70 percent of voters in the state said they disapproved of Bush's job performance and those voters broke for Barack Obama by a 70-30 margin. Of the 48 percent of voters in Ohio who said McCain would carry on with Bush's policies, 92 percent voted for Obama.

It was only late in the campaign (the third presidential debate) that McCain began to forcefully criticize the president. It appears he should have done that much earlier.


Filed under: Ohio • President Bush
November 4th, 2008
09:31 PM ET
5 years ago

Schneider: Race played a role

Obama's race boosted his results.
Obama's race boosted his results.

(CNN) - So, did race play a role? Yes, but it worked in Obama's favor.

About 20 percent of voters said race was important in how they voted, and those people voted for Obama by an 11-point margin, 55 percent to 44 percent. That means more people voted for Obama because of his race than against him. So much for the "Bradley effect."

And of the 80 percent of voters who said race was not a factor in their decision voted nearly the same way, breaking for Obama 53 percent to 45 percent. That means race played a role, but it was not a decisive factor.


Filed under: Candidate Barack Obama
November 4th, 2008
08:54 PM ET
5 years ago

Schneider: N.H. independents abandon McCain

(CNN) – New Hampshire independents, that demographic that propelled John McCain to wins in the state's 2000 and 2008 Republican primaries, heavily broke against him in the general election, according to exit polls.

Obama won just over 60 percent of the independent vote in the state, and considering independents make up 50 percent of the electorate in New Hampshire, it's the key reason why the Illinois senator carried the crucial swing state.


Filed under: John McCain
November 4th, 2008
08:35 PM ET
5 years ago

Schneider: Palin gets low marks on experience

(CNN) – The perception that Sarah Palin is unqualified to be president appears to have resonated with a large proportion of voters, according to exit polls.

Exactly 60 percent of voters said the Alaska governor is not qualified to be president if necessary while 38 percent said she is. That compares to the two-thirds of voters who said Joe Biden is qualified to be president and the 31 percent who said he isn't.

If John McCain loses the election, Sarah Palin's effect on the race will be heavily debated.


Filed under: Uncategorized
November 4th, 2008
06:27 PM ET
5 years ago

Schneider: Voters say economy stinks

Voters register sour mood on economy.
Voters register sour mood on economy.

(CNN) - Voters had a particularly pessimistic view of the nation's economy, the exit polls show. Only 6 percent said the economy was in excellent or good condition, while 93 percent said it was poor.

Voters are slightly more optimistic about the future Just less than 50 percent say the economy will get better over the next year, while a quarter think it will stay the same. But more than 20 percent predict that the economy will get worse.

One rule in politics: When the economy is bad, it is always the No. 1 issue, and it usually hurts the incumbent party.


Filed under: Economy
October 15th, 2008
10:00 PM ET
6 years ago

Schneider: Public suspicious of free trade

HEMPSTEAD, New York (CNN) – Both Obama and McCain are free traders, but McCain's problem is that he is a more full-throated ideological free trader and that doesn't play well in economic times of trouble.

The public is very suspicious of free trade.


Filed under: Bill Schneider • Presidential Debate
October 15th, 2008
09:37 PM ET
6 years ago

Schneider: McCain falling into the weeds

HEMPSTEAD, New York (CNN) - McCain is falling into the weeds by taking the bait and talking about the campaign ad squabbling.

Obama is making an effort to come across as Joe Cool, McCain is noticeably addled.

October 15th, 2008
09:36 PM ET
6 years ago

Schneider: Obama should avoid this

HEMPSTEAD, New York (CNN) - Obama is trying to rise above the squabbling. The moderator invited it in asking them to address the attacks, but Obama would be wise not to be baited.

By keeping his eye on the ball and addressing the economy he looks more presidential.

October 15th, 2008
09:26 PM ET
6 years ago

Schneider: Is balancing the budget realistic?

HEMPSTEAD, New York (CNN) - The only way the the budget can be balanced - the only way it has ever been balanced - is with an economic boom.

It has never been balanced through spending cuts.

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